Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

How can I output the current date and time with the defaulttimezone? When I use following code I always get the time in GMT. Is it possible to convert NSDate to the defaulttimezone? I can’t use the NSDateFormatter because I need an NSDate Object with the correct time.

NSDate *date = [NSDate date];
NSLog(@"Time: %@", date);

Output: 2010-09-26 12:07:12 TimeTest[2641:207] Time: 2010-09-26 12:07:12 GMT

Update: When I have to return an NSDate object with the right time, how can I use NSDateFormatter with setTimeZone?

 NSDate* date = [NSDate date];

 NSDateFormatter *formatter = [[[NSDateFormatter alloc] init] autorelease];
 [formatter setDateFormat:@"yyyy-MM-dd hh:mm:ss"];
 NSTimeZone *tz = [NSTimeZone timeZoneWithName:@"MESZ"];
 [formatter setTimeZone:tz];

 NSString *datestr = [formatter stringFromDate:date];
 NSLog(@"%@", datestr);

 NSDate *datenew = [formatter dateFromString:str];
 NSLog(@"%@", datenew);

The first NSLog outputs the correct time but when I want to make an NSDate object with the correct time I get the wrong time again.

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I can’t use the NSDateFormatter because I need an NSDate Object with the correct time.

That doesn't make any sense. NSDate represents a single point in time. It does not know nor care about time zones. For example, Today, 12:00 GMT and Today, 06:00 –0600 would be represented by one and the same NSDate object.

To display a date in a specific timezone, use NSDateFormatter, specifically its setTimeZone: method.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried it with NSDateFormatter but I can’t get to the right result. Please see the code above. – MikeT Sep 26 '10 at 10:45
    
You haven't understood it yet. date and datenew represent the same point in time. The time zone in which a date is displayed is just a matter of presentation and not the actual underlying data. Therefore, your question, "When I have to return an NSDate object with the right time, how can I use NSDateFormatter with setTimeZone?", doesn't make sense. You already have an NSDate object with the right time. – Ole Begemann Sep 26 '10 at 11:47
    
Now I understand what you mean. I’m sorry for this bad question. Thank you! – MikeT Sep 26 '10 at 12:17

Sometimes you DO want to have the current time ([NSDate date], but have it converted to your time zone, and not just formatted that way for the user, but to do calculations with it. I came up with this simple solution:

double timeDifference = [[NSTimeZone systemTimeZone] secondsFromGMT];
double now = [[NSDate date] timeIntervalSince1970] + timeDifference;

It is useful for getting the current timeInterval, in my time zone. In my case, the dates were all very flexible and dynamic, and not linked to any calender. I was working with times relative to a start time.

Difficult to explain. Anyway, maybe some people with my issue, who ended up in this post, now have their answer too.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.