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I m doing this

def power_two(n, base = -1):
    result = 2 ** base
    if result < n:
        base += 1
        power_two(n, base)
    else:
        if result == n:
            print base
        else:
            print base - 1

what is the pythonic way to find largest power of two less than X number?

EDIT example: power_two(100) return only the power

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1  
When you say less than, do you mean "less than or equal" or "strictly less than"? In other words, what should it return if n is an exact power of 2, for example 32? –  Mark Byers Sep 26 '10 at 11:45
2  
What's "pythonic" about using logarithms? Those are Python's antecedents by 377 years or so. –  JUST MY correct OPINION Sep 26 '10 at 11:47
    
@JUST MY correct OPINION: What would you suggest instead? –  Mark Byers Sep 26 '10 at 11:49
1  
What I just said: logarithms. Your answer is perfect. It's just ... you know ... not really pythonic. More "universally mathematical". –  JUST MY correct OPINION Sep 26 '10 at 12:21

4 Answers 4

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Find the logarithm and truncate it:

def power_two(n):
    return int(math.log(n, 2))
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thank you, but I want this return 6 "2**6" instead 64 –  user422100 Sep 26 '10 at 11:36
    
@mark: I mean return only 6, the "2**6" was to explain where the 6 come from, but you give me a pythonic way, thank you –  user422100 Sep 26 '10 at 11:46
    
@user422100: OK, I understand now. –  Mark Byers Sep 26 '10 at 11:47
1  
Of course, if n <= 0 an exception is raised. –  Dimitris Leventeas Sep 26 '10 at 12:51
    
In Python3.2: int(math.log(4,2)) == 1, but int(math.log(8,2)) == 3. It is an inconsistent behavior for power_two() function. –  J.F. Sebastian Sep 26 '10 at 12:58

You could use bit_length():

def power_two(n):
    return n.bit_length() - 1

By definition for n != 0: 2**(n.bit_length()-1) <= abs(n) < 2**n.bit_length()

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1  
This is a nice solution, although actually Tony Veijalainen actually already posted it - it's just his answer is less clear. I gave my +1 to him for being first to suggest it and also for mentioning that it requires Python 2.7 or newer which is a very real concern - many users are still on Python 2.6. –  Mark Byers Sep 26 '10 at 13:10
    
@Mark Byers: I've up-voted Tony Veijalainen as well (it was -1). Python 2.7 is the current version of CPython therefore I don't mention it explicitly (I use 2.4 at work so I understand where you're coming from). When I saw your answer I've thought that there must be some bit twiddling solution (MSB). long.bits_in_digit() is not public so bit_length() is the next best thing. –  J.F. Sebastian Sep 26 '10 at 13:33

Two ways, first works only in Python 2.7 and maybe 3+:

import random
for number in (random.randint(0,1<<32) for _ in range(16)):
    print "%20i,%4i, %4i" % (number, number.bit_length()-1, len(bin(number))-3)
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1  
The -3 part would be messed up if binary would be negative. –  Tony Veijalainen May 3 '12 at 9:12

Um well I'm sure the other suggestions work, but I feel they will perform awfully slow. I haven't actually verified any speeds, but this should be extremely fast!

This is also in Java. So you would need to convert it.

public static int getPowerOfTwo(int size)
{
    int n = -1;
    while (size >> ++n > 0);
    return (1 << n - 1 == size) ? size : 1 << n;
}

public static int getNextPowerOfTwo(int size)
{
    int n = -1;
    while (size >> ++n > 0);
    return 1 << n;
}

public static int getPreviousPowerOfTwo(int size)
{
    int n = -1;
    while (size >> ++n > 0);
    return 1 << n - 1;
}
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