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I am trying to understand what Python's descriptors are and what they can useful for. However, I am failing at it. I understand how they work, but here are my doubts. Consider the following code:

class Celsius(object):
    def __init__(self, value=0.0):
        self.value = float(value)
    def __get__(self, instance, owner):
        return self.value
    def __set__(self, instance, value):
        self.value = float(value)


class Temperature(object):
    celsius = Celsius()
  1. Why do I need the descriptor class? Please explain using this example or the one you think is better.

  2. What is instance and owner here? (in __get__). So my question is, what is the purpose of the third parameter here?

  3. How would I call/ use this example?

Sorry for being such a noob, but I can't really understand how to get this working.

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47  
Never be sorry, you have asked an excellent question, very well defined and clear. Good one! –  Anders Sep 26 '10 at 17:10
    
@Anders: Thanks. I thought this was a pretty basic concept. –  Matt Bronson Sep 26 '10 at 17:28
    
It's a bit unusual to see a descriptor class storing the value in itself rather than in the instance, as this means you only have one value shared between all instances of Temperature. Perhaps that's what you want; if not, change self.value to instance.value. –  jchl Sep 27 '10 at 9:04
    
IMHO it would be better to do def __get__(self, instance, owner=None):. If you look at properties, functions, class methods and static methods, they all accept a __get__ call with only 1 argument... –  glglgl Sep 19 '12 at 11:31

4 Answers 4

up vote 48 down vote accepted

The descriptor is how python's property type is implemented. A descriptor simply implements __get__, __set__, etc. and is then added to another class in its definition (as you did above with the Temperature class). For example

temp=Temperature()
temp.celsius #calls Celsius.__get__

Accessing the property you assigned the descriptor to (celsius in the above example) calls the appropriate descriptor method.

instance in __get__ is the instance of the class (so above, __get__ would receive temp, while owner is the class with the descriptor (so it would be Temperature).

You need to use a descriptor class to encapsulate the logic that powers it. That way, if the descriptor is used to cache some expensive operation (for example), it could store the value on itself and not its class.

An article about descriptors can be found at http://martyalchin.com/2007/nov/23/python-descriptors-part-1-of-2/

EDIT: As jchl pointed out in the comments, if you simply try Temperature.celsius, instance will be None.

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Thanks for the information, I will read up the article. –  Matt Bronson Sep 26 '10 at 17:20
    
What is the difference between a property and a descriptor class? –  Matt Bronson Sep 26 '10 at 17:28
4  
@Matt: A property is a kind of descriptor; it has __get__ and __set__ methods. If Python did not give you the property decorator, you could still implement it on your own by defining a class with __get__ and __set__ methods. –  unutbu Sep 26 '10 at 17:40
3  
To clarify something said in this answer: instance in __get__ will be None if you access the descriptor via the class (i.e. Temperature.celsius). –  jchl Sep 27 '10 at 9:02

I tried (with minor changes as suggested) the code from Andrew Cooke's answer. (I am running python 2.7).

The code:

#!/usr/bin/env python
class Celsius:
    def __get__(self, instance, owner): return 9 * (instance.fahrenheit + 32) / 5.0
    def __set__(self, instance, value): instance.fahrenheit = 32 + 5 * value / 9.0

class Temperature:
    def __init__(self, initial_f): self.fahrenheit = initial_f
    celsius = Celsius()

if __name__ == "__main__":

    t = Temperature(212)
    print(t.celsius)
    t.celsius = 0
    print(t.fahrenheit)

The result:

C:\Users\gkuhn\Desktop>python test2.py
<__main__.Celsius instance at 0x02E95A80>
212

With Python prior to 3, make sure you subclass from object which will make the descriptor work correctly as the get magic does not work for old style classes.

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Why do I need the descriptor class? Please explain using this example or the one you think is better.

it gives you extra control over how attributes work. if you're used to getters and setters in java, for example, then it's python's way of doing that. one advantage is that it looks to users just like an attribute (there's no change in syntax). so you can start with an ordinary attribute and then, when you need to do something fancy, switch to a descriptor.

an attribute is just a mutable value. a descriptor lets you execute arbitrary code when reading or setting (or deleting) a value. so you could imagine using it to map an attribute to a field in a database, for example - a kind of ORM.

another use might be refusing to accept a new value by throwing an exception in __set__ - effectively making the "attribute" read only.

What is instance and owner here? (in __get__). So my question is, what is the purpose of the third parameter here?

this is pretty subtle (and the reason i am writing a new answer here - i found this question while wondering the same thing and didn't find the existing answer that great).

a descriptor is defined on a class, but is typically called from an instance. when it's called from an instance both instance and owner are set (and you can work out owner from instance so it seems kinda pointless). but when called from a class, only owner is set - which is why it's there.

this is only needed for __get__ because it's the only one that can be called on a class. if you set the class value you set the descriptor itself. similarly for deletion. which is why the owner isn't needed there.

How would I call/ use this example?

well, here's a cool trick using similar classes:

class Celsius:
    def __get__(self, instance, owner): return 9 * (instance.fahrenheit + 32) / 5
    def __set__(self, instance, value): instance.fahrenheit = 32 + 5 * value / 9

class Temperature:
    def __init__(self, initial_f): self.fahrenheit = initial_f
    celsius = Celsius()

t = Temperature(212)
print(t.celsius)
t.celsius = 0
print(t.fahrenheit)

(i'm using python 3; for python 2 you need to make sure those divisions are / 5.0 and / 9.0). that gives:

100.0
32.0

now there are other, arguably better ways to achieve the same effect in python (eg if celsius were a property, which is the same basic mechanism but places all the source inside the Temperature class), but that shows what can be done...

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A cool trick indeed. Thanks for sharing it. –  Jon Coombs Feb 2 at 4:21

Well, I am 100% sure, that the video I found (Discovering Descriptors from EuroPython 2012) will clarify all the moments. The lecturer just perfectly gave all descriptors internals. Must see, indeed.

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very help video –  C Johnson Aug 8 '13 at 17:40

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