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I'm trying to output a square of X's using an array. The diagonals of the square will be filled with 'X' and the empties will be filled with spaces '_'.

Here's the code I got:

public static char[][] square(int z) {
    int size=5;
    char[][] myArr = new char[size][size];
    for (int c=0;c<size;c++)
        myArr[c][c]='X';
    for (int r=0;r<size;r++)
    {
        for (int col=size-1;col>=0;col--)//put X
        {
            myArr[r][col]='X';
        }
    }
    for(int count=0;count<size;count++){
        if (myArr[count][count]!='X')
            myArr[count][count]=' ';
    }

    return myArr;

}

This should be working-I ran it manually on paper and everything should have been fine. What can the problem be?

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1  
if everything should have been fine, what wasn't fine? as in, what error message did you get? –  Carl Sep 26 '10 at 19:58
    
looking at the code it could be a few things :) –  willcodejavaforfood Sep 26 '10 at 20:02
    
Not really related to the problem you ask (as I think eumiro posted the correct solution), but I'm just curious, are you actually using the parameter "int z" in the function at all? –  AndyG Sep 26 '10 at 20:08
    
Mind telling me what isn't working or better what exactly you're expecting? –  Octavian Damiean Sep 26 '10 at 20:12
    
Expected: X---X (where - is a space) Actual: XXXXX –  newtojava Sep 26 '10 at 20:21
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4 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You code seems a little bit overcomplicated with all those ifs and clever loops.
Just fill array with 'background chars' and then draw diagonal.

    char[][] myArr = new char[size][size];
    for (int i = 0; i < size; ++i) {
        Arrays.fill(myArr[i], ' ');
    }
    // now we have square filled with spaces

    // draw diagonal, like you did it
    for (int c = 0; c < size; c++) {
        myArr[c][c] = 'X';
        myArr[c][size - c - 1] = 'X';
    }

edit
Updated to draw two diagonals.

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I dont see what you did there..myArr[i]=new char[size]..what was that for? Also when you use Arrays.fill(myArr[i], ' '), how come you only specify one dimension and not two? –  newtojava Sep 26 '10 at 20:11
    
@Nikita Rybak: The code you posted still only draws one diagonal (from NW corner to SE corner). You still need to draw a diagonal from NE to SW corners. Also, why initialize the array values with "background chars"? Besides adding overhead, I can't think of anything else it would do. –  AndyG Sep 26 '10 at 20:15
    
@SauceMaster The code you posted still only draws one diagonal (from NW corner to SE corner) I mentioned it and said why in my answer. –  Nikita Rybak Sep 26 '10 at 20:19
    
I thought I was drawing two? Theres the first loop where the dimensions are the same [c][c], which is the left to right loop. Then there is the other nested loop which draws the right to left loop, no? –  newtojava Sep 26 '10 at 20:20
    
@SauceMaster Besides adding overhead Are you saying it's a waste of resources to make N^2 + 2*N assignments instead of N^2? :) I just did what produces simpler code. –  Nikita Rybak Sep 26 '10 at 20:21
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The problem is probably, that here:

for (int r=0;r<size;r++)
{
    for (int col=size-1;col>=0;col--)//put X
    {
        myArr[r][col]='X';
    }
}

you are itering over the whole square (size * size) and not just drawing the Northeast - Southwest diagonal.

Try to replace it with this:

for (int r=0;r<size;r++)
{
    myArr[r][size - r] = 'X'
}

EDIT: To make your code little bit compacter:

public static char[][] square(int size) {
    char[][] myArr = new char[size][size];
    for (int c = 0; c < size; c++) {
        for (int r = 0; r < size; r++) {
            if ((c == r) || ( c == size - r)) {
                myArr[r][c] = 'X';
            } else { 
                myArr[r][c] = ' ';
            }
        }
    }
    return myArr;
}
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This still only covers one diagonal- the easy one where the rows and columns numbers are equal. What about the right to left diagonal where the row and column numbers are not the same? –  newtojava Sep 26 '10 at 20:26
1  
Isn't ((c == r) || ( c == size - r)) covering both diagonals? –  eumiro Sep 27 '10 at 5:01
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When you Iterate your loop, you want the diagonals to be 'x'. You can save a lot of work and code by minimizing how much you iterate.

public static char[][] square(int z) {
int size = z;
char[][] myArr = new char[size][size];

for(int i = 0;i < size;i++)
{
    for(int j = 0;j < size;j++)
    {
        if(i == j)
        {
             myArr[i][j] = 'X';
        }
        else if(i + j == size - 1)
        {
             myArr[i][j] = 'X';
        else
        {
             myArr[i][j] = " ";
        }
     }
}

return myArr;

}
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This is only the right to left diagonal, what about the left to right diagonal, where i!=j? –  newtojava Sep 26 '10 at 20:16
    
Also, your not even using the parameter 'z'. We could eliminate that as well. I'm not quite sure what your challenging us on, but I think that function just creates the array you described, if we want to be creative we could just use x as the dimensions of the square and have an x,x sized square with 'X' in the middle! =) –  Bryan Harrington Sep 26 '10 at 20:20
    
I had it, but you still gota subtract i + j = size - 1; –  Bryan Harrington Sep 26 '10 at 20:30
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First problem is that when you do new char[size][size]; you still should new each char array before you use it.

This can be merged with the first for loop easily:

 for (int c=0;c<size;c++) {
    myArr[c] = new char[size]; // allocate the array
    myArr[c][c]='X';
 }

Next the algorithm doesn't work, though this one would:

public static char[][] square (int z) {
    int size = z, cap=((size+1) /2);
    char[][] myArr = new char[size][size];
    for (int c = 0; c < cap; c++) { // iterate only half the array doing 4 positions per iteration
        myArr[c] = new char[size];
        myArr[size-c-1] = new char[size];
        Arrays.fill(myArr[size-c-1],' '); // make the new line blank
        Arrays.fill(myArr[c], ' '); // make the new line blank
        myArr[c][c] = 'X';  // top left to center
        myArr[size - c - 1][size-c-1] = 'X'; // bottom right to center
        myArr[size - c - 1][c] = 'X'; // bottom left to center
        myArr[c][size - c - 1] = 'X'; // top right to center
    }
    return myArr;
}

/** test square algorithm by printing it to System.out */
private static void testSquare () {
    char[][] sq = square(5);
    for (char[] l : sq) {
        System.out.println(new String(l));
    }
}
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