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I have an Obj-C method similar to this:

-(void)getUserDefaults:(BOOL *)refreshDefaults
{
    PostAppDelegate *appDelegate = [[UIApplication sharedApplication] delegate];

    if (refreshDefaults) {
    	[appDelegate retrieveDefaults];
    }
}

When I call it like this I get no warning:

[self getUserDefaults:NO];

When I call it like this I get a warning:

[self getUserDefaults:YES];

warning: passing argument 1 of 'getUserDefaults:' makes pointer from integer without a cast

NOTE: I always call the method passing NO first, then sometime later I pass YES

Can anyone fill me in on what the issue is here? Thanks.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 15 down vote accepted

getUserDefaults takes a BOOL*. You don't get a warning when you pass NO because NO is 0 and 0 is NULL, which is a legal BOOL*. YES is 1 and the same conversion isn't automatically safe.

You should make getUserDefaults take a plain BOOL, instead of a pointer.

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BOOL is a primitive type, not a class, so your method declaration should be

-(void)getUserDefaults:(BOOL)refreshDefaults;

instead. The reason you're getting the warning you are is that 0 (which is what NO is defined to be) is a valid pointer value without a cast, equivalent to NULL, but 1 (which is what YES is defined to be) isn't a valid pointer value without a cast.

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1  
Pointers to primitives are perfectly legal. –  Andrew Medico Dec 19 '08 at 3:43
    
Yes, but he's not passing in a pointer to BOOL, he's just passing in a BOOL, which is why he's getting that error. –  dancavallaro Dec 19 '08 at 3:47

I have never seen Obj-C code before, but I'm pretty sure it's because the 'refreshDefaults' is a pointer to BOOL whereas it should be a BOOL.

I don't know about the typing rules in Obj-C, but it looks like NO is defined as 0 and the compiler has no problems converting that to a pointer value (a NULL pointer.) That would not be the case with integer '1'. (Also note "if (refreshDefaults)" is valid code that checks the pointer refreshDefaults against the NULL pointer)

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Cool thanks! That makes sense, and fixed it! Here is the updated code for reference:

-(void)getUserDefaults:(BOOL)refreshDefaults
{
PostAppDelegate *appDelegate = [[UIApplication sharedApplication] delegate];

if (refreshDefaults) {
	[appDelegate retrieveDefaults];
}
}
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2  
Couple of quick things: 1) you should edit your original question if you want to show working code vs. non-working; this isn't a forum. Second, if somebody helped you, you should give them credit by accepting their answer :) –  Jason Coco Dec 19 '08 at 7:14

In the first case, NO probably defaults to 0 - the null pointer. This is a valid Bool*. Yes will default to 1, and so when it is cast to a Bool* you are passing the integer 1 in - which is then turned into a Bool*.

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