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Does anyone have a solution for styling the borders of "select" elements in Internet Explorer using CSS?

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1  
You could just wrap the select tag with a div and put the border on that div –  Kieran Jun 2 '11 at 4:47

15 Answers 15

up vote 28 down vote accepted

As far as I know, it's not possible in IE because it uses the OS component.

Here is a link where the control is replaced, but I don't know if thats what you want to do.

Edit: The link is broken I'm dumping the content

<select> Something New, Part 1

By Aaron Gustafson

So you've built a beautiful, standards-compliant site utilizing the latest and greatest CSS techniques. You've mastered control of styling every element, but in the back of your mind, a little voice is nagging you about how ugly your <select>s are. Well, today we're going to explore a way to silence that little voice and truly complete our designs. With a little DOM scripting and some creative CSS, you too can make your <select>s beautiful… and you won't have to sacrifice accessibility, usability or graceful degradation.

The Problem

We all know the <select> is just plain ugly. In fact, many try to limit its use to avoid its classic web circa 1994 inset borders. We should not avoid using the <select> though--it is an important part of the current form toolset; we should embrace it. That said, some creative thinking can improve it.

The <select>

We'll use a simple for our example:

<select id="something" name="something">
  <option value="1">This is option 1</option>
  <option value="2">This is option 2</option>
  <option value="3">This is option 3</option>
  <option value="4">This is option 4</option>
  <option value="5">This is option 5</option>
</select>

[Note: It is implied that this <select> is in the context of a complete form.]

So we have five <option>s within a <select>. This <select> has a uniquely assigned id of "something." Depending on the browser/platform you're viewing it on, your <select> likely looks roughly like this:

A <select> as rendered in Windows XP/Firefox 1.0.2.

or this

A <select> as rendered in Mac OSX/Safari 1.2.

Let's say we want to make it look a little more modern, perhaps like this:

Our concept of a nicely-styled <select>.

So how do we do it? Keeping the basic <select> is not an option. Apart from basic background color, font and color adjustments, you don't really have a lot of control over the .

However, we can mimic the superb functionality of a <select> in a new form control without sacrificing semantics, usability or accessibility. In order to do that, we need to examine the nature of a <select>.

A <select> is, essentially, an unordered list of choices in which you can choose a single value to submit along with the rest of a form. So, in essence, it's a <ul> on steroids. Continuing with that line of thinking, we can replace the <select> with an unordered list, as long as we give it some enhanced functionality. As <ul>s can be styled in a myriad of different ways, we're almost home free. Now the questions becomes "how to ensure that we maintain the functionality of the <select> when using a <ul>?" In other words, how do we submit the correct value along with the form, if we are no longer using a form control?

The solution

Enter the DOM. The final step in the process is making the <ul> function/feel like a <select>, and we can accomplish that with JavaScript/ECMA Script and a little clever CSS. Here is the basic list of requirements we need to have a functional faux <select>:

  • click the list to open it,
  • click on list items to change the value assigned & close the list,
  • show the default value when nothing is selected, and
  • show the chosen list item when something is selected.

With this plan, we can begin to tackle each part in succession.

Building the list

So first we need to collect all of the attributes and s out of the and rebuild it as a . We accomplish this by running the following JS:

function selectReplacement(obj) {
  var ul = document.createElement('ul');
  ul.className = 'selectReplacement';
  // collect our object's options
  var opts = obj.options;
  // iterate through them, creating <li>s
  for (var i=0; i<opts.length; i++) {
    var li = document.createElement('li');
    var txt = document.createTextNode(opts[i].text);
    li.appendChild(txt);
    ul.appendChild(li);
  }
  // add the ul to the form
  obj.parentNode.appendChild(ul);
}

You might be thinking "now what happens if there is a selected <option> already?" We can account for this by adding another loop before we create the <li>s to look for the selected <option>, and then store that value in order to class our selected <li> as "selected":

…
  var opts = obj.options;
  // check for the selected option (default to the first option)
  for (var i=0; i<opts.length; i++) {
    var selectedOpt;
    if (opts[i].selected) {
      selectedOpt = i;
      break; // we found the selected option, leave the loop
    } else {
      selectedOpt = 0;
    }
  }
  for (var i=0; i<opts.length; i++) {
    var li = document.createElement('li');
    var txt = document.createTextNode(opts[i].text);
    li.appendChild(txt);
    if (i == selectedOpt) {
      li.className = 'selected';
    }
    ul.appendChild(li);
…

[Note: From here on out, option 5 will be selected, to demonstrate this functionality.]

Now, we can run this function on every <select> on the page (in our case, one) with the following:

function setForm() {
  var s = document.getElementsByTagName('select');
  for (var i=0; i<s.length; i++) {
    selectReplacement(s[i]);
  }
}
window.onload = function() {
  setForm();
}

We are nearly there; let's add some style.

Some clever CSS

I don't know about you, but I am a huge fan of CSS dropdowns (especially the Suckerfish variety). I've been working with them for some time now and it finally dawned on me that a <select> is pretty much like a dropdown menu, albeit with a little more going on under the hood. Why not apply the same stylistic theory to our faux-<select>? The basic style goes something like this:

ul.selectReplacement {
  margin: 0;
  padding: 0;
  height: 1.65em;
  width: 300px;
}
ul.selectReplacement li {
  background: #cf5a5a;
  color: #fff;
  cursor: pointer;
  display: none;
  font-size: 11px;
  line-height: 1.7em;
  list-style: none;
  margin: 0;
  padding: 1px 12px;
  width: 276px;
}
ul.selectOpen li {
  display: block;
}
ul.selectOpen li:hover {
  background: #9e0000;
  color: #fff;
}

Now, to handle the "selected" list item, we need to get a little craftier:

ul.selectOpen li {
  display: block;
}
ul.selectReplacement li.selected {
  color: #fff;
  display: block;
}
ul.selectOpen li.selected {
  background: #9e0000;
  display: block;
}
ul.selectOpen li:hover,
ul.selectOpen li.selected:hover {
  background: #9e0000;
  color: #fff;
}

Notice that we are not using the :hover pseudo-class for the <ul> to make it open, instead we are class-ing it as "selectOpen". The reason for this is two-fold:

  1. CSS is for presentation, not behavior; and
  2. we want our faux-<select> behave like a real <select>, we need the list to open in an onclick event and not on a simple mouse-over.

To implement this, we can take what we learned from Suckerfish and apply it to our own JavaScript by dynamically assigning and removing this class in `onclick events for the list items. To do this right, we will need the ability to change the onclick events for each list item on the fly to switch between the following two actions:

  1. show the complete faux-<select> when clicking the selected/default option when the list is collapsed; and
  2. "select" a list item when it is clicked & collapse the faux-<select>.

We will create a function called selectMe() to handle the reassignment of the "selected" class, reassignment of the onclick events for the list items, and the collapsing of the faux-<select>:

As the original Suckerfish taught us, IE will not recognize a hover state on anything apart from an <a>, so we need to account for that by augmenting some of our code with what we learned from them. We can attach onmouseover and onmouseout events to the "selectReplacement" class-ed <ul> and its <li>s:

function selectReplacement(obj) {
  …
  // create list for styling
  var ul = document.createElement('ul');
  ul.className = 'selectReplacement';
  if (window.attachEvent) {
    ul.onmouseover = function() {
      ul.className += ' selHover';
    }
    ul.onmouseout = function() {
      ul.className = 
        ul.className.replace(new RegExp(" selHover\\b"), '');
    }
  }
  …
  for (var i=0; i<opts.length; i++) {
    …
    if (i == selectedOpt) {
      li.className = 'selected';
    }
    if (window.attachEvent) {
      li.onmouseover = function() {
        this.className += ' selHover';
      }
      li.onmouseout = function() {
        this.className = 
          this.className.replace(new RegExp(" selHover\\b"), '');
      }
    }
  ul.appendChild(li);
}

Then, we can modify a few selectors in the CSS, to handle the hover for IE:

ul.selectReplacement:hover li,
ul.selectOpen li {
  display: block;
}
ul.selectReplacement li.selected {
  color: #fff;
  display: block;
}
ul.selectReplacement:hover li.selected**,
ul.selectOpen li.selected** {
  background: #9e0000;
  display: block;
}
ul.selectReplacement li:hover,
ul.selectReplacement li.selectOpen,
ul.selectReplacement li.selected:hover {
  background: #9e0000;
  color: #fff;
  cursor: pointer;
}

Now we have a list behaving like a <select>; but we still need a means of changing the selected list item and updating the value of the associated form element.

JavaScript fu

We already have a "selected" class we can apply to our selected list item, but we need a way to go about applying it to a <li> when it is clicked on and removing it from any of its previously "selected" siblings. Here's the JS to accomplish this:

function selectMe(obj) {
  // get the <li>'s siblings
  var lis = obj.parentNode.getElementsByTagName('li');
  // loop through
  for (var i=0; i<lis.length; i++) {
    // not the selected <li>, remove selected class
    if (lis[i] != obj) {
      lis[i].className='';
    } else { // our selected <li>, add selected class
      lis[i].className='selected';
    }
  }
}

[Note: we can use simple className assignment and emptying because we are in complete control of the <li>s. If you (for some reason) needed to assign additional classes to your list items, I recommend modifying the code to append and remove the "selected" class to your className property.]

Finally, we add a little function to set the value of the original <select> (which will be submitted along with the form) when an <li> is clicked:

function setVal(objID, selIndex) {
  var obj = document.getElementById(objID);
  obj.selectedIndex = selIndex;
}

We can then add these functions to the onclick event of our <li>s:

…
  for (var i=0; i<opts.length; i++) {
    var li = document.createElement('li');
    var txt = document.createTextNode(opts[i].text);
    li.appendChild(txt);
    li.selIndex = opts[i].index;
    li.selectID = obj.id;
    li.onclick = function() {
      setVal(this.selectID, this.selIndex);
      selectMe(this);
    }
    if (i == selectedOpt) {
      li.className = 'selected';
    }
    ul.appendChild(li);
  }
…

There you have it. We have created our functional faux-. As we have not hidden the originalyet, we can [watch how it behaves](files/4.html) as we choose different options from our faux-. Of course, in the final version, we don't want the original to show, so we can hide it byclass`-ing it as "replaced," adding that to the JS here:

function selectReplacement(obj) {
  // append a class to the select
  obj.className += ' replaced';
  // create list for styling
  var ul = document.createElement('ul');
…

Then, add a new CSS rule to hide the

select.replaced {
  display: none;
}

With the application of a few images to finalize the design (link not available) , we are good to go!


And here is another link to someone that says it can't be done.

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The first link in this answer is dead (404). –  mydoghasworms May 31 '11 at 7:34
11  
@mydoghasworms: I'm very sorry that a link in an answer made 2½ years ago don't work anymore. You can still access the page via: web.archive.org/web/20090922234755/http://v2.easy-designs.net/… –  some May 31 '11 at 16:27
    
What might be more helpful is pulling the content FROM these links because link rot does happen! meta.stackexchange.com/questions/8231/… –  rlemon Jun 19 '12 at 12:31
    
@rlemon I agree that it might be helpful in many cases, but it is also a potential copyright infringement to copy&paste a whole article. In this case, my answer stood for itself without the link. –  some Jun 19 '12 at 17:41
    
The site did post "Except where otherwise noted, this site is licensed under a Creative Commons License." and it is cited back to the original author.. I think in this case dumping the content here with his name attached to it is actually more helpful to him than being stuck in some wayback machine :) –  rlemon Jun 19 '12 at 17:47

extrapolate it! :)

  filter: 
    progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.dropshadow(OffX=-1, OffY=0,color=#FF0000)
    progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.dropshadow(OffX=1, OffY=0,color=#FF0000)
    progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.dropshadow(OffX=0, OffY=-1,color=#FF0000)
    progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.dropshadow(OffX=0, OffY=1,color=#FF0000);
share|improve this answer
2  
Hey! That was very good! –  Tony Oct 22 '11 at 0:28
    
This is a great alternative to what I was doing in IE7 and below, which was using a wrapper div around the element. And in IE8+ I can just use the more standard outline property instead. –  zachleat Jan 23 '12 at 23:06
    
Brilliant! Thank you... –  Jeremy West Mar 29 '12 at 17:13
    
I recently realized that when the filter is applied a second time the item is no longer visible. I was outlining in red for validation purposes. If validation fires again my outlined item is gone. Still awesome solution, but back to drawing board for me. –  Jeremy West Apr 17 '12 at 16:06

From my personal experience where we tryed to put the border red when an invalid entry was selected, it is impossible to put border red of select element in IE.

As stated before the ocntrols in internet explorer uses WindowsAPI to draw and render and you have nothing to solve this.

What was our solution was to put the background color of select element light red (for text to be readable). background color was working in every browser, but in IE we had a side effects that the element where the same background color as the select.

So to summarize the solution we putted :

select
{
  background-color:light-red;
  border: 2px solid red;
}
option
{
  background-color:white;
}

Note that color was set with hex code, I just don't remember which.

This solution was giving us the wanted effect in every browser except for the border red in IE.

Good luck

share|improve this answer
    
similar to this you chould just wrap the select tag in a div with a border on it. –  Kieran Jun 2 '11 at 4:46

i was having this same issue with ie, then i inserted this meta tag and it allowed me to edit the borders in ie

<meta http-equiv="X-UA-Compatible" content="IE=100" >
share|improve this answer

Using ONLY css is impossbile. In fact, all form elements are impossible to customize to look in the same way on all browsers only with css. You can try niceforms though ;)

share|improve this answer
    
Hey, that looks pretty good - have you implemented this on any sites at all? –  Sam Murray-Sutton Feb 3 '09 at 13:11
    
I tried once but i didn't like it so i wrote my own script :P –  Ionut Staicu Feb 6 '09 at 21:44
    
Nice link, thanks. But (not surprisingly): "The script is fully compatible and has been tested with most major browsers, with the exception of IE6." –  Daniel Rinser Jul 26 '10 at 11:18
3  
@Daniel: IE6 is a 10 years old browser. Don't you want to let it rest in peace? :) Besides that: dowebsitesneedtolookexactlythesameineverybrowser.com ;) –  Ionut Staicu Jul 26 '10 at 16:24
    
Don't get me wrong, I hate IE6 (like everyone involved in webdev) and agree 100% that websites shouldn't be designed "pixel-perfect" or expected to look the same in every browser. I just wanted to point this out because the question explicitly states IE6/IE7. –  Daniel Rinser Jul 27 '10 at 17:35

IE < 8 does not render the dropdown list itself it just uses the windows control which cannot be styled this way. Beginning from IE 8 this has changed and the styling is now applied. Of course, its market share is rather negligible yet.

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I've worked around the inability to put a border on the select in IE7 (IE8 in compatibility mode)

By giving it a border as wel as a padding, it looks like something....

Not everything, but it's start...

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Check out this code... hope ur happy :)

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" />
<title>Untitled Document</title>
<style type="text/css">
<style type="text/css">
*{margin:0;padding:0;}
select {font: normal 13px Arial, SansSerif, Verdana; color: black;}
.wrapper{width:198px; position: relative;  height: 20px; overflow: hidden; border-top:1px solid #dddddd; border-left:1px solid #dddddd;}
.Select{color: black; background: #fff;position: absolute; width: 200px; top: -2px; left: -2px;}
optgroup{background-color:#0099CC;color:#ffffff;}
</style>
</head>

<body>
<div class="wrapper">
<select class="Select">
<optgroup label="WebDevelopment"></optgroup>
<option>ASP</option>
<option>PHP</option>
<option>ColdFusion</option>
<optgroup label="Web Design"></optgroup>
<option>Adobe Photoshop</option>
<option>DreamWeaver</option>
<option>CSS</option>
<option>Adobe Flash</option>
</select>
</div>
</body>
</html>

Sajay

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The border-style property is a short-hand command to define the border styles of all sides an html element. Each side can have a different style.

http://www.handycss.com/tips/styling-borders-with-css/

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You'd need a custom-designed select box with CSS and JavaScript. You'd need to make absolutely sure it degrades perfectly to a standard select element should a user have JavaScript disabled.

IMO, it's just not worth the effort. Stick with font stylings within the select to make it close to your site's design; leave the borders, etc., to the box elements.

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To do a border along one side of a select in IE use IE's filters:

select.required { border-left:2px solid red; filter: progid:DXImageTransform.Microsoft.dropshadow(OffX=-2, OffY=0,color=#FF0000) }

I put a border on one side only of all my inputs for required status.

There is probably an effects that do a better job for an all-round border ...

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms532853(v=VS.85).aspx

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Just add an doctype declaration before the html tag

ex.: <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/strict.dtd">

It is gonna work in JSP files as well. For further info: HTML Doctype Declaration

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It works!!! Use the following code:

<style>
div.select-container{
   border: 1px black;width:200px;
}
</style>


<div id="status" class="select-container">
    <select name="status">
        <option value="" >Please Select...</option>
        <option value="option1">Option 1</option>
        <option value="option2">Option 2</option>
    </select>
</div>
share|improve this answer

It solves to me, for my purposes:

.select-container {
  position:relative;
  width:200px;
  height:18px;
  overflow:hidden;
  border:1px solid white !important
}
.select-container select {
  position:relative;
  left:-2px;
  top:-2px
}

To put more style will be necessary to use nested divs .

share|improve this answer

use div around your box

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This does not provide an answer to the question. To critique or request clarification from an author, leave a comment below their post - you can always comment on your own posts, and once you have sufficient reputation you will be able to comment on any post. –  JMax Aug 27 '12 at 12:41

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