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Same as title!

EDIT: Almost exactly the same as, and would be contextually equal to http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1383/

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marked as duplicate by Jon Limjap Dec 19 '08 at 6:43

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
When I typed in the question, that sure didn't come up - but thank you for the rudeness. – misterMatthew Dec 19 '08 at 7:02
    
You are right, the related question does not show up when you type that title. Nevertheless, closing duplicates is not rude on Stack Overflow. It is necessary and not to be taken personally. – Tomalak Dec 19 '08 at 8:20
    
Which is why I said "almost exactly the same as", because while the wording is different (causing it NOT to show up) the context of the question IS the same. We need to close duplicates to make sure questions aren't repeatedly answered as much as possible. – Jon Limjap Dec 22 '08 at 9:22

Copy and Paste:

Unit testing From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (Redirected from Unit test) Jump to: navigation, search

In computer programming, unit testing is a method of testing that verifies the individual units of source code are working properly. A unit is the smallest testable part of an application. In procedural programming a unit may be an individual program, function, procedure, etc., while in object-oriented programming, the smallest unit is a method, which may belong to a base/super class, abstract class or derived/child class.

Ideally, each test case is independent from the others; Double objects like stubs, mock or fake objects[1] as well as test harnesses can be used to assist testing a module in isolation. Unit testing is typically done by software developers to ensure that the code other developers have written meets software requirements and behaves as the developer intended.

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