Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Throughout many third-party libraries and best practices blogs/recommendations, etc... it is common to see syntax like this:

typeof x === 'object' (instead of typeof x == 'object')
typeof y === 'string' (instead of typeof x == 'string')
typeof z === 'function' (instead of typeof x == 'function')

If the typeof operator already returns a string, what's the need to type check the return value as well? If typeof(typeof(x)) is always string, no matter what x actually is, then == should be sufficient and === unnecessary.

Under what circumstances will typeof not return a string literal? And even if there's some fringe case why is the additional type check being used for object, string, function, etc...

share|improve this question
7  
There are no circumstances. Most people are just deathly afraid of type casting for some reason (cough Crockford) –  MooGoo Sep 27 '10 at 13:02
3  
@MooGoo When the type casting rules in JavaScript are so arbitrary, it's probably a good thing to not trust. –  Skilldrick Sep 27 '10 at 13:07
1  
Sure, but I'm asking just about use when using typeof. If people are just blanketly changing every == to === in their code using some ide then I say that's wrong. –  Eric P Sep 27 '10 at 13:14
1  
@Eric I'd say it's better to be consistent. What's wrong with using === everywhere? –  Skilldrick Sep 27 '10 at 13:18
2  
@Skilldrick: I'd say that learning the rules about type coercion when using the == operator is better than saying "Woah, that's a bit weird" and avoiding it altogether. –  Tim Down Sep 27 '10 at 13:29
show 8 more comments

5 Answers 5

To answer the main question - there is no danger in using typeof with ==. Below is the reason why you may want to use === anyway.


The recommendation from Crockford is that it's safer to use === in many circumstances, and that if you're going to use it in some circumstances it's better to be consistent and use it for everything.

The thinking is that you can either think about whether to use == or === every time you check for equality, or you can just get into the habit of always writing ===.

There's hardly ever a reason for using == over === - if you're comparing to true or false and you want coercion (for example you want 0 or '' to evaluate to false) then just use if(! empty_str) rather than if(empty_str == false).


To those who don't understand the problems of == outside of the context of typeof, see this, from The Good Parts:

'' == '0'          // false
0 == ''            // true
0 == '0'           // true

false == 'false'   // false
false == '0'       // true

false == undefined // false
false == null      // false
null == undefined  // true

' \t\r\n ' == 0    // true
share|improve this answer
2  
No, that's not what I asked: I'm asking specifically when using the typeof operator. –  Eric P Sep 27 '10 at 13:07
2  
@Eric I know, but what I'm saying is the reason to use === is for consistency with the rest of your code. –  Skilldrick Sep 27 '10 at 13:08
1  
Thanks. Seems to be the consensus so far - style over need. –  Eric P Sep 27 '10 at 13:18
2  
@Eric I think it's a perfectly grounded mistrust! The rules for type coercion are very weird. –  Skilldrick Sep 27 '10 at 13:23
1  
Sure, but in the case of typeof, where we're applying a built-in operator that is stated to return a value of a specific type, that's saying you don't trust the operator. –  Eric P Sep 27 '10 at 13:27
show 9 more comments

If the typeof operator already returns a string, what's the need to type check the return value as well? If typeof(typeof(x)) is always string, no matter what x actually is, then == should be sufficient and === unnecessary.

It's subjective. You can just as easily turn this around, and ask, "Why would you use == when you don't expect implicit conversions?" Both work fine here, so use the one you feel expresses your intention better. Try to be consistent within a project.

share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks. Seems to be the consensus so far - style over need. –  Eric P Sep 27 '10 at 13:19
add comment

There's no reason at all to favour === over == in this case, since both operands are guaranteed to be strings and both operators will therefore give the same result. Since == is one character fewer I would favour that.

Crockford's advice on this is to use === all the time, which is reasonable advice for a beginner but pointlessly paranoid if you know the issues (covered in other answers).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Seems to be the consensus so far - style over need. –  Eric P Sep 27 '10 at 13:30
add comment

Because === is quicker than ==, due to omitting type coercion. Sure it is probably a negligible difference but it is still there.

share|improve this answer
2  
This isn't necessarily true: if you look at the steps each operator is required to take in the ECMAScript spec, they are in fact identical in the case of comparing two objects of the same type such as two strings. Try benchmarking it. –  Tim Down Sep 28 '10 at 8:58
add comment

Triple equal operators are mostly used for variable type and value checking (all in 1 expression), also known as equality without type coercion.

Example:

var a = 1;
var b = 1;
var c = "1";
var d = "1";

alert (a === b); //True, same value and same type (numeric)
alert(c === d); //True, same value and same type (string)
alert(b === c); //False, different type but same value of 1

See Doug Crockford's YUI Theater on type coercion.


If the typeof operator already returns a string, what's the need to type check the return value as well? If typeof(typeof(x)) is always string, no matter what x actually is, then == should be sufficient and === unnecessary.

The most efficient reason for not using typeof and rather the === operator would be for type coercion (interpretation) between browsers. Some browsers can pass 6=="6" as true and some wouldn't (depending on the strictness of the JS interpreter) so by introducing type coercion would clarify this. Also, it would bring the "Object-Orientativity" approach to it since JavasScript's variables are not type-based variables (i.e. variable types are not declared on compile time like in Java).

E.g. in Java, this would fail:

if ("6" instanceof Number) { // false

Hope I answered your question.

share|improve this answer
    
Again - not what I asked. –  Eric P Sep 27 '10 at 13:12
    
Oops...sorry, never read your question fully...updating.... –  Buhake Sindi Sep 27 '10 at 13:15
    
Nope, I'm asking specifically in cases involving the use of the typeof operator. typeof 6 should always return the string literal "number", so type checking "typeof 6" should never be necessary. –  Eric P Sep 27 '10 at 13:29
    
well, typeof is dependent on how browser interpret the variable or value....so your typeof can work on one browser and fail on another (typical is the IE case). Most JS developers want a library that runs on all brothers with minimal knowledge of each browser. So, playing with the language fully without learning each browser tweeks, helps. –  Buhake Sindi Sep 27 '10 at 13:35
1  
I highly doubt there is any Javascript interpreter that would evaluate 6=="6" as false –  MooGoo Sep 27 '10 at 13:47
show 3 more comments

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.