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Assuming dictionary keys and values have their equals and hash methods implemented correctly, what is the most succinct and efficient way to test for equality of two dictionaries?

In this context two dictionaries are said to be equal if they contain the same set of keys (order not important), and for every such key, they agree on the value.

here are some ways i came up with (there are probably many more):

public bool Compare1<TKey, TValue>(
    Dictionary<TKey, TValue> dic1, 
    Dictionary<TKey,TValue> dic2)
{
    return dic1.OrderBy(x => x.Key).
        SequenceEqual(dic2.OrderBy(x => x.Key));
}

public bool Compare2<TKey, TValue>(
    Dictionary<TKey, TValue> dic1, 
    Dictionary<TKey, TValue> dic2)
{
    return (dic1.Count == dic2.Count && 
        dic1.Intersect(dic2).Count().
        Equals(dic1.Count));
}

public bool Compare3<TKey, TValue>(
    Dictionary<TKey, TValue> dic1, 
    Dictionary<TKey, TValue> dic2)
{
    return (dic1.Intersect(dic2).Count().
        Equals(dic1.Union(dic2).Count()));
}
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7 Answers 7

up vote 39 down vote accepted
dic1.Count == dic2.Count && !dic1.Except(dic2).Any();
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This doesn't seem correct to me. –  Dan Tao Sep 27 '10 at 14:53
    
Sorry, have now added the missing not to make it correct. The dictionaries are equivalent if they are the same size and there are not any elements which are in the first and not in the second. –  Nick Jones Sep 27 '10 at 14:57
    
That seems better ;) –  Dan Tao Sep 27 '10 at 15:02
2  
Why is this correct? It does not respect the required equality of the values. It jut check the existence of all keys in both dictionaries. –  Sebastian P.R. Gingter May 22 '13 at 9:13
4  
@SebastianP.R.Gingter: A Dictionary<TKey, TValue>> is also an instance of IEnumerable<KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>>. So you are comparing instances of KeyValuePair<TKey, TValue>, which are equal if both the key and the value are equal. –  Konamiman May 12 '14 at 9:00

It really depends on what you mean by equality.

This method will test that two dictionaries contain the same keys with the same values (assuming that both dictionaries use the same IEqualityComparer<TKey> implementation).

public bool CompareX<TKey, TValue>(
    Dictionary<TKey, TValue> dict1, Dictionary<TKey, TValue> dict2)
{
    if (dict1 == dict2) return true;
    if ((dict1 == null) || (dict2 == null)) return false;
    if (dict1.Count != dict2.Count) return false;

    var valueComparer = EqualityComparer<TValue>.Default;

    foreach (var kvp in dict1)
    {
        TValue value2;
        if (!dict2.TryGetValue(kvp.Key, out value2)) return false;
        if (!valueComparer.Equals(kvp.Value, value2)) return false;
    }
    return true;
}
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+1 Nice, I like it –  w69rdy Sep 27 '10 at 14:12
2  
aren't you emptying the dictionary? comparex would fail the second time called since the second parameter is empty. why modify a dictionary - doesn't that violate a principle about a simple equality check? –  NG. Sep 27 '10 at 14:20
1  
is this more efficient than Nick's answer? dic1.Count == dic2.Count && !dic1.Except(dic2).Any(); –  rony l Sep 29 '10 at 9:18
1  
@rony: The Except method works in a similar way to my answer. The performance should be very close, although I would expect mine to maybe have a slight edge: the Except method requires an initial pass through dic2 to construct a separate set. You'd need to benchmark yourself to be sure, but I'd be surprised if there's any major difference. –  LukeH Sep 29 '10 at 9:47
1  
@LukeH: great, thanks! –  rony l Sep 30 '10 at 12:10

You could use linq for the key/value comparisons:

public bool Compare<TKey, TValue>(Dictionary<TKey, TValue> dict1, Dictionary<TKey, TValue dict2)
{
    IEqualityComparer<TValue> valueComparer = EqualityComparer<TValue>.Default;

    return  dict1.Count == dict2.Count &&
            dict1.Keys.All(key => dict2.ContainsKey(key) && valueComparer.Equals(dict1[key], dict2[key]));
}
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@Allen's answer:

bool equals = a.Intersect(b).Count() == a.Union(b).Count()

is about arrays but as far as IEnumerable<T> methods are used, it can be used for Dictionary<K,V> too.

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In the OP questions it did say that the equality test should cover not just the matching of keys but also their value "In this context two dictionaries are said to be equal if they contain the same set of keys (order not important), and for every such key, they agree on the value."

Am I missing something or does the marked answer http://stackoverflow.com/a/3804852/916121 only check for equality of size and keys but not their value?

I would have posted this next to the answer but couldnt work out how to add it as a comment, sorry.

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If two dictionaries contain the same keys, but in different order, should they be considered equal? If not, then the dictionaries should be compared by running enumerators through both simultaneously. This will probably be faster than enumerating through one dictionary and looking up each element in the other. If you have advance knowledge that equal dictionaries will have their elements in the same order, such a double-enumeration is probably the way to go.

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For Nested Dictionaries and Lists, I combined a couple of the ideas here to make this: https://gist.github.com/NullVoxPopuli/f95baaa48b4e9854dcfe (too much code to post here) ~ 100 Lines

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