Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

There is a need to build constraint on the column that guarantees that only one value in all rows is 1 and all the others are 0.

Solution with triggers exists but I would like to have something built in.

Is such thing possible at all?

share|improve this question
up vote 9 down vote accepted

Edit

Actually I just noticed you are on SQL Server 2008 you could use a filtered index for this

CREATE UNIQUE NONCLUSTERED INDEX UIX ON YourTable (col) where col = 1

Original Answer

The easiest way would probably be to store this one special pk in a separate one row table. The no more than one row aspect can be enforced with check constraints.

CREATE TABLE OneRowTable
(
lock CHAR(1) DEFAULT 'X' NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY CHECK (lock = 'X'),
OtherTablePK int
);

Otherwise assuming you might have an id field comprised of positive integers you could add a computed column with the following definition

case when col=1 then -1 else id end

and add a unique constraint to that.

share|improve this answer
    
@Tim - No. Using UDFs in check constraints can fail with multi row updates and under snapshot isolation. I'd just use the filtered index approach. It will ensure that at most 1 row can contain the value 1. If you update your question with your table definition I'll try and clarify my second suggestion. (Edit: That was in reply to your earlier comment that seems to have gone now!) – Martin Smith Sep 27 '10 at 20:01
    
yeah, I have checked that in details and it became clear. Thanks! – Tim Sep 28 '10 at 7:42
    
This also has the effect of dramatically speeding up queries that involve the "active" row, i.e. "where col = 1" – Jeff Meatball Yang Nov 14 '11 at 18:06

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.