Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there any performance benefit one way or another? Is it compiler/VM specific? I am using Hotspot.

share|improve this question

10 Answers 10

First: you shouldn't be making the choice of static vs non-static on the basis of performance.

Second: in practice, it won't make any difference. Hotspot may choose to optimize in ways that make static calls faster for one method, non-static calls faster for another.

Third: much of the mythos surrounding static versus non-static are based either on very old JVMs (which did not do anywhere near the optimization that Hotspot does), or some remembered trivia about C++ (in which a dynamic call uses one more memory access than a static call).

share|improve this answer
17  
+1 Premature optimization is the root of all evil. Just wait until you have to test this code. –  Aaron Digulla Sep 27 '10 at 15:16

Well, static calls can't be overridden (so are always candidates for inlining), and don't require any nullity checks. HotSpot does a bunch of cool optimizations for instance methods which may well negate these advantages, but they're possible reasons why a static call may be faster.

However, that shouldn't affect your design - code in the most readable, natural way - and only worry about this sort of micro-optimization if you have just cause (which you almost never will).

share|improve this answer
    
They're possible reasons why a static call may be faster Could you explain me those reasons? –  JavaTechnical Jul 20 '13 at 19:17
    
@JavaTechnical: The answer explains those reasons - no overriding (which means you don't need to work out the implementation to use each time and you can inline) and you don't need to check whether you're calling the method on a null reference. –  Jon Skeet Jul 20 '13 at 19:49
    
I want it from a performance perspective –  JavaTechnical Jul 20 '13 at 19:51
    
@JavaTechnical: I don't understand. I've just given you things that don't need to be computed/checked for static methods, along with an inlining opportunity. Not doing work is a performance benefit. What's left to understand? –  Jon Skeet Jul 20 '13 at 19:53
    
Are static variables retrieved faster than non-static variables? –  JavaTechnical Jul 20 '13 at 19:56

As previous posters have said: This seems like a premature optimization.

However, there is one difference (a part from the fact that non-static invokations require an additional push of a callee-object onto the operand stack):

Since static methods can't be overridden, there will not be any virtual lookups in runtime for a static method call. This may result in an observable difference in under circumstances.

The difference on a byte-code level is that a non-static method call is done through INVOKEVIRTUAL, INVOKEINTERFACE or INVOKESPECIAL while a static method call is done through INVOKESTATIC.

share|improve this answer
1  
A private instance method, however, is (at least typically) invoked using invokespecial since it is not virtual. –  Mark Peters Sep 27 '10 at 15:23
    
Ah, interesting, I could only think of constructors, that's why I omitted it! Thanks! (updating answer) –  aioobe Sep 27 '10 at 15:25
    
The JVM will optimize if there's one type is instantiated. If B extends A, and no instance of B has been instantiated, method calls on A will not need a virtual table lookup. –  Steve Kuo Sep 27 '10 at 16:09

It is unbelievably unlikely that any difference in the performance of static versus non-static calls is making a difference in your application. Remember that "premature optimization is the root of all evil".

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for quoting Dijkstra. –  Powerlord Sep 27 '10 at 15:14
8  
Or was it Knuth? ;) –  haffax Sep 27 '10 at 15:17
    
It was Knuth! shreevatsa.wordpress.com/2008/05/16/… –  ShreevatsaR Sep 27 '10 at 17:52

It is compiler/VM specific.

  • In theory, a static call can be made slightly more efficient because it doesn't need to do a virtual function lookup, and it can also avoid the overhead of the hidden "this" parameter.
  • In practice, many compilers will optimize this out anyway.

Hence it's probably not worth bothering about unless you have identified this as a truly critical performance issue in your application. Premature optimization is the root of all evil etc...

However I have seen this optimization give a substantial performance increase in the following situation:

  • Method performing a very simple mathematical calculation with no memory accesses
  • Method being invoked millions of times per second in a tight inner loop
  • CPU bound application where every bit of performance mattered

If the above applies to you, it may be worth testing.

There is also one other good (and potentially even more important!) reason to use a static method - if the method actually has static semantics (i.e. logically is not connected to a given instance of the class) then it makes sense to make it static to reflect this fact. Experienced Java programmers will then notice the static modifier and immediately think "aha! this method is static so it doesn't need an instance and presumably doesn't manipulate instance specific state". So you will have communicated the static nature of the method effectively....

share|improve this answer

For the decision if a method should be static, the performance aspect should be irrelevant. If you have a performance problem, making lots of methods static isn't going to save the day. That said, static methods are almost certainly not slower than any instance method, in most cases marginally faster:

1.) Static methods are not polymorphic, so the JVM has less decisions to make to find the actual code to execute. This is a moot point in the Age of Hotspot, since Hotspot will optimize instance method calls that have only one implementation site, so they will perform the same.

2.) Another subtle difference is that static methods obviously have no "this" reference. This results in a stack frame one slot smaller than that of an instance method with the same signature and body ("this" is put in slot 0 of the local variables on the bytecode level, whereas for static methods slot 0 is used for the first parameter of the method).

share|improve this answer

There might be a difference, and it might go either way for any particular piece of code, and it might change with even a minor release of the JVM.

This is most definitely part of the 97% of small efficiencies that you should forget about.

share|improve this answer

Okay, in the hope of settling this question once and forever, I have written a benchmark which shows how the different kinds of calls (virtual, non-virtual, static) compare to each other.

I ran it on ideone, and this is what I got:

(Larger number of iterations is better.)

    Success time: 3.12 memory: 320576 signal:0
  Name          |  Iterations
    VirtualTest |  128009996
 NonVirtualTest |  301765679
     StaticTest |  352298601
Done.

As expected, virtual method calls are the slowest, non-virtual method calls are faster, and static method calls are even faster.

What I did not expect was the differences to be so pronounced: Virtual method calls run at less than half the speed of non-virtual method calls, which in turn run a whole 15% slower than static calls.

I suppose the results will vary from JVM to JVM, so try it for yourself and see what you get:

import java.io.*;

class StaticVsInstanceBenchmark
{
    public static void main( String[] args ) throws Exception
    {
        StaticVsInstanceBenchmark program = new StaticVsInstanceBenchmark();
        program.run();
    }

    static final int DURATION = 1000;

    public void run() throws Exception
    {
        doBenchmark( new VirtualTest( new ClassWithVirtualMethod() ), 
                     new NonVirtualTest( new ClassWithNonVirtualMethod() ), 
                     new StaticTest() );
    }

    void doBenchmark( Test... tests ) throws Exception
    {
        System.out.println( "  Name          |  Iterations" );
        doBenchmark2( devNull, 1, tests ); //warmup
        doBenchmark2( System.out, DURATION, tests );
        System.out.println( "Done." );
    }

    void doBenchmark2( PrintStream printStream, int duration, Test[] tests ) throws Exception
    {
        for( Test test : tests )
        {
            long iterations = runTest( duration, test );
            printStream.printf( "%15s | %10d\n", test.getClass().getSimpleName(), iterations );
        }
    }

    long runTest( int duration, Test test ) throws Exception
    {
        test.terminate = false;
        test.count = 0;
        Thread thread = new Thread( test );
        thread.start();
        Thread.sleep( duration );
        test.terminate = true;
        thread.join();
        return test.count;
    }

    static abstract class Test implements Runnable
    {
        boolean terminate = false;
        long count = 0;
    }

    static class ClassWithStaticStuff
    {
        static int staticDummy;
        static void staticMethod() { staticDummy++; }
    }

    static class StaticTest extends Test
    {
        @Override
        public void run()
        {
            for( count = 0;  !terminate;  count++ )
            {
                ClassWithStaticStuff.staticMethod();
            }
        }
    }

    static class ClassWithVirtualMethod implements Runnable
    {
        int instanceDummy;
        @Override public void run() { instanceDummy++; }
    }

    static class VirtualTest extends Test
    {
        final Runnable runnable;

        VirtualTest( Runnable runnable )
        {
            this.runnable = runnable;
        }

        @Override
        public void run()
        {
            for( count = 0;  !terminate;  count++ )
            {
                runnable.run();
            }
        }
    }

    static class ClassWithNonVirtualMethod
    {
        int instanceDummy;
        final void nonVirtualMethod() { instanceDummy++; }
    }

    static class NonVirtualTest extends Test
    {
        final ClassWithNonVirtualMethod objectWithNonVirtualMethod;

        NonVirtualTest( ClassWithNonVirtualMethod objectWithNonVirtualMethod )
        {
            this.objectWithNonVirtualMethod = objectWithNonVirtualMethod;
        }

        @Override
        public void run()
        {
            for( count = 0;  !terminate;  count++ )
            {
                objectWithNonVirtualMethod.nonVirtualMethod();
            }
        }
    }

    static final PrintStream devNull = new PrintStream( new OutputStream() 
    {
        public void write(int b) {}
    } );
}
share|improve this answer

In theory, less expensive.

Static initialization is going to be done even if you create an instance of the object, whereas static methods will not do any initialization normally done in a constructor.

However, I haven't tested this.

share|improve this answer
1  
@R. Bemrose, what does static initialization have to do with this question? –  Kirk Woll Sep 27 '10 at 15:16
    
@Kirk Woll: Because Static Initialization is done the first time the class is referenced... including prior to the first static method call. –  Powerlord Sep 27 '10 at 15:23
    
@R. Bemrose, sure, as is loading the class into the VM to begin with. Seems like a non-sequitor, IMO. –  Kirk Woll Sep 27 '10 at 15:35

As Jon notes, static methods can't be overridden, so simply invoking a static method may be -- on a sufficiently naive Java runtime -- faster than invoking an instance method.

But then, even assuming you're at the point where you care about messing up your design to save a few nanoseconds, that just brings up another question: will you need method overriding yourself? If you change your code around to make an instance method into a static method to save a nanosecond here and there, and then turn around and implement your own dispatcher on top of that, yours is almost certainly going to be less efficient than the one built into your Java runtime already.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.