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I'm writing a small class that acts as a very basic HTTP client. As part of a project I'm working on, I'm making it cookie aware. However, it's unclear to me what happens when my client receives multiple "Set-Cookie" headers with the same key but different values are set.

For example,

Set-Cookie: PHPSESSID=abc; path=/
Set-Cookie: PHPSESSID=def; path=/
Set-Cookie: PHPSESSID=ghi; path=/

Which one of these is supposed to be the value for PHPSESSID? This usually ends up happening when you call session_start() and then session_regenerate_id() on the same page. Each will set its own header. All browsers seem to do okay with this, but I can't seem to get my client to pick the right one out.

Any ideas?!

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3 Answers 3

The answer is supposed to be in draft-ietf-httpstate-cookie.

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Since posting, this has been superseded by RFC 6265. –  Brad Koch Jul 24 '14 at 20:32

RFC 6265 section 4.1.2 states:

If the user agent receives a new cookie with the same cookie-name,
domain-value, and path-value as a cookie that it has already stored,
the existing cookie is evicted and replaced with the new cookie.
Notice that servers can delete cookies by sending the user agent a
new cookie with an Expires attribute with a value in the past.

So I would process the headers in order given and overwrite them if there is a duplicate. So in your case you would have just one PHPSESSID=ghi.

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RFC 6265 states:

Servers SHOULD NOT include more than one Set-Cookie header field in the same response with the same cookie-name.

I would therefore be very concerned if your service sends multiple Set-Cookie headers with the same key.

As a client, the typical user agent behavior seems to be to take the value of the last header. The RFC alludes to that behavior with this statement:

If the user agent receives a new cookie with the same cookie-name, domain-value, and path-value as a cookie that it has already stored, the existing cookie is evicted and replaced with the new cookie.

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It's not saying should not send multiple set-cookie headers. It's saying multiple headers with the same cookie-name. –  Blaze Jun 19 at 19:11
    
Fixed, in case it wasn't clear from the OP's context. –  Brad Koch Jun 19 at 19:15

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