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I seem unable to use a Closure as a parameter to a superclass constructor when it is specified inline.

class Base {

  def c

  Base(c) {
    this.c = c
  }

  void callMyClosure() {
    c()
  }
}

class Upper extends Base {
  Upper() {
    super( { println 'called' } )
  }
}

u = new Upper()
u.callMyClosure()

The compilation fails with the message Constructor call must be the first statement in a constructor..

I realize this a somewhat strange use-case, and I can design around it for the time being. But I'm interested, is this is to be expected? Or have I got the syntax incorrect?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think that the problem is related to the fact that Groovy turns the constructor into something different while trying to compile it as a Java class. Maybe the closure definition is expanded before the call to super generating that error.

A workaround is to define the closure outside the constructor itself:

class Base {
  def c

  Base(c) {this.c = c}


  void callMyClosure() {
    c()
  }
}

class Upper extends Base {
  static cc = {println 'called'}

  Upper() {
    super(cc)
  }
}

u = new Upper()
u.callMyClosure()

It's not so nice but at least it works.. another way could be to define the closure by using a normal new Closure(...) syntax

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That's what I was expecting, but just couldn't find any documentation. I also found the same behavior using a Map that was initialized there. –  David Padbury Sep 27 '10 at 21:24
    
Out of interest, what's the new Closure syntax? The Closure class itself is abstract. –  David Padbury Sep 27 '10 at 21:27
    
I did some tries to find out that weird syntax (instantiate the closure before using it into the constructor).. from what I understood it seems that it's abstract because you usually subclass it and implement the doCall method that is the effective body of the closure –  Jack Sep 27 '10 at 23:26
    
Yeah - it's certainly interesting to read about. Thanks for your input! –  David Padbury Sep 28 '10 at 1:14

It might be confusing a closure and a block...can you try

super( { -> println 'called' } )
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Gives the same result I'm afraid. Good idea though! –  David Padbury Sep 27 '10 at 21:13

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