Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

anyone able to tell me how often a materialized view is set to refresh with the following setting plz?

REFRESH FORCE ON DEMAND START WITH sysdate+0 NEXT (round(sysdate) + 1/24) + 1

i think i read it as every hour but i'm not sure

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted
SQL> alter session set nls_date_format = 'yyyy-mm-dd :hh24:mi:ss';

Session changed.

SQL> select sysdate from dual;

SYSDATE
--------------------
2008-12-19 :12:18:28

SQL> select (round(sysdate) + 1/24) + 1  from dual;

(ROUND(SYSDATE)+1/24
--------------------
2008-12-21 :01:00:00
share|improve this answer

To answer your first question (will this run once an hour?):

Nope, this will run once when you create it because of this clause:

START WITH sysdate+0

Personally, I think the "+0" is extraneous, as now is now.

Then it will run tomorrow at 1 a.m., because of the following clause:

NEXT (round(sysdate) + 1/24) + 1

The "1/24" part calculates when 1 a.m. is, since Oracle dates are actually stored as numbers, with the decimal part indicating hours, minutes, etc. The syntax is just fine.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for a more-detailed explanation. To clarify further, round(sysdate) gives you MM/DD/YY @ 12:00:00. + 1/24 (an hour) makes the value MM/DD/YY @ 01:00:00. +1 (a day) makes the value MM/DD+1/YY 01:00:00. –  craig May 19 '11 at 19:43

I'm not 100% sure that it's legal in a materialized view scheduling statement, but you might like to try the (arguably) more intuitive INTERVAL specification:

round(sysdate) + interval '1 1' day to hour

Other examples here: http://download.oracle.com/docs/cd/B19306_01/server.102/b14200/sql_elements003.htm#SQLRF00221

share|improve this answer

i think using

NEXT (trunc(sysdate) + 1/24) + 1

is more accurate

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.