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I try to implement C++ properties as templates as defined in WikiPedia

template <typename T> class property {
        T value;
    public:
        T & operator = (const T &i) {
            ::std::cout << i << ::std::endl;
            return value = i;
        }
        // This template class member function template serves the purpose to make
        // typing more strict. Assignment to this is only possible with exact identical
        // types.
        template <typename T2> T2 & operator = (const T2 &i) {
            ::std::cout << "T2: " << i << ::std::endl;
            T2 &guard = value;
            throw guard; // Never reached.
        }
        operator T const & () const {
            return value;
        }
};

Now suppose I declare 2 classes, one of which contains the other as a property:

class A
{
    public:
        Property<double> pA1;
        Property<double> pA2;
};

class B
{
    public:
        Property<A> pB1;
        Property<double> pB2;
};

Now, is there a way to declare a B and access properties of A in it?

B b;
b.pB1.pA1=1;

does not work and;

((A) b.pB1).pA1=1;

works w/o error but does not actually change the actual A of B, because accesing ((A) b.pB1).pA1 gives unchanged value, since it probably makes a copy.

Is there a way to do it w/o pointers?

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What does not work mean? givs an error? –  Shaihi Sep 27 '10 at 20:35

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Casting one object to another type results in a temporary copy that goes out of scope as soon as that line of code is done. Did you mean to write ((A&) b.pB1).pA1=1; ?

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and is there a way to create a property in B that refers directly to pA1? like Property<double> pA1_in_B=((A&) this->pB1).pA1; –  paul simmons Sep 27 '10 at 21:03
    
@paul, I think pA1_in_B would have to be declared as a reference for that code to do what you expect. You could in theory also take the address of the entire mess and work with it as a pointer. –  Michael Kristofik Sep 27 '10 at 21:09

b.pB1 doesn't have pA1 field. Instead, it has b.pB1.value.pA1. Using "." actually calls to "member access operator", bypassing type convert operator. Explicit type conversion works, but is not a safe code in a long term:

((A&)b.pB1).pA1 = 1.0;

A better way is to implement member access operator. It breaks encapsulation too (since the operator can be called explicitly), but much safer compared to explicit type conversion:

T* operator->()             { return &value; }
...
b.pB1->pA1 = 3.0;

The full example:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

template <typename T>
class Property
{
    T value;
public:
    T& operator=(const T& x) {
        return value = x;
    }
    template <typename T2>
    T2 & operator = (const T2 &i) {
        T2 &guard = value;
        throw guard; // Never reached
    }
    operator T const & () const { return value; }

    const T* operator->() const { return &value; }
    T* operator->()             { return &value; }
};

class A
{
public:
    Property<double> pA1;
    Property<double> pA2;
};

class B
{
public:
    Property<A> pB1;
    Property<double> pB2;
};

int
main()
{
    B b;

    //b.pB2 = 1;    // not allowed by guard
    b.pB2 = 1.0;

    ((A&)b.pB1).pA1 = 2.0;
    cout << "b.pB1.pA1: " << ((A&)b.pB1).pA1 << endl;

    b.pB1->pA1 = 3.0;
    b.pB1->pA2 = 4.0;
    cout << "b.pB1.pA1: " << b.pB1->pA1 << endl;
    cout << "b.pB1.pA2: " << b.pB1->pA2 << endl;

    return 0;
}
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Have you tried adding a non-const function operator?

operator T& () 
{
    return value;
}

This breaks encapsulation, but your sample usage suggests you want to be able to modify properties.

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