Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

This is a trivial programming question. I am not an expert in Java. Say I use objects of custom classes Company and Employee, in a manner similar to what many RDBMS examples do:

class Employee
{
    Company company;
}

class Company
{
    String name;
}

I need to guarantee that different Company objects have unique names - i.e. no two such objects may have the same name, because from my point of view it makes no sense, and also simply eats memory - if two employees work at IBM, then there is a single Company object with that name, period.

My thoughts right now go along of making Company constructor private - so that the job of allocating Company objects with arbitrary names is delegated to a trusted method - which, suppose, will reject any subsequent attempt to create an object with a name that already exists or return an existing or new object (creating one if necessary).

The problem is, I am not sure how to accomplish this elegantly. One thing that would be nice is not having to do a O(n) lookup every time an Company object with a name is requested - so maybe a hash map or a binary tree is there for my convenience? I would also like to override the way the Company objects are identified - which leads me to this: will I be overriding Object.equals and/or Object.hashCode methods?

share|improve this question
    
Are you sure that you should be concerned about the extra memory usage? You're going to have to pay for keeping track of all of the companies somehow, and it'll cost you (probably in CPU). Make sure that your optimization isn't premature. –  nojo Sep 27 '10 at 22:04
    
This isn't necessarily so much for optimization, as it is for the importance of the constraint that two Company objects with the same name should be avoided. That way, if, say the company referenced by N employees changes name, I only have to actually do it for one Company object. Stuff like that. –  amn Sep 27 '10 at 22:27

5 Answers 5

Take a look at the flyweight pattern.

What I would do is something like:

// incomplete, but you get the idea hopefully
CompanyFactory
{
    private Map<String, Company> companies;

    public getCompany(final String name)
    {
        Company company;

        company = compaines.get(name);

        if(company == null)
        { 
            company = new Company(name);
            companies.put(name, company);
        }

        return (company);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 - This is the exact problem that the flyweight pattern was designed to solve. :) –  aperkins Sep 27 '10 at 21:13
    
Yes, that's what I started doing. However, I am concerned about references to Company objects - it looks like that this map, even though useful here, will retain the references to all Company objects ever created, even though there may be no more "good" references left to these objects. I am thinking of a WeakHashMap, but the weak refers to the keys, not values :'-( –  amn Sep 27 '10 at 21:23
    
I believe when the key is removed from the WeakHashMap the value is also removed, and is thus eligible for garbage collection. –  TofuBeer Sep 27 '10 at 21:31
    
Yes you are right, but my keys are Strings - when are these removed? So, I am not entirely sure how a WeakHashMap<String, Company> will even behave, considering it will use Strings as keys... –  amn Sep 27 '10 at 21:41
    
If you allow Companies to be collected with a WeakHashMap, then you can't guarantee your requirement: "I need to guarantee that different Company objects have unique names". Unless you have a point where you know that a company has been deleted, and your Factory object can be informed when it's deleted. No need for a WeakHashMap here, I think. –  nojo Sep 27 '10 at 22:02

You could override equals and hashCode and store them in a HashMap or HashSet.

share|improve this answer
    
how would you look them up? –  Michael Borgwardt Sep 27 '10 at 21:11
    
@Michael: see the flyweight pattern mentioned below. –  aperkins Sep 27 '10 at 21:12
    
@Michael My basic idea was it would allow all sorts of usages that might be natural, like map.get(company) or set.contains(company). –  Fabian Steeg Sep 27 '10 at 21:16
1  
@Michael: except that overriding equals and hashCode properly will allow hashMap and hashSet to eliminate duplicate values for you. Doing nothing does not give the same effect. –  Lie Ryan Sep 27 '10 at 22:01
2  
@Lie: It is you who still misunderstands. hashCode and equals within the domain class are only useful to recognize existing duplicates, but you want to avoid creating duplicates. The only way to do that is to have a Map of instances keyed to the name - which makes hashCode and equals within the domain class unnecessary. –  Michael Borgwardt Sep 28 '10 at 7:37

One thing that would be nice is not having to do a O(n) lookup every time an Company object with a name is requested - so maybe a hash map or a binary tree is there for my convenience?

That sounds right, yes.

I would also like to override the way the Company objects are identified - which leads me to this: will I be overriding Object.equals and/or Object.hashCode methods?

If you ensure that there are never two instances with the same key value, you actually don't have to do that.

share|improve this answer

When I want to create a collection of objects that can be looked by by unique names, I store a Map of Strings (names) to Objects. I can then look up the object related to a name.

Strictly speaking, you don't need to touch equals() and hashCode() to do that, as you are not storing your objects as keys. Implementing equals() and hashCode() correctly can be difficult to get right, and keys in a Map implementation like HashMap (which can give you efficient lookups) is sensitive to these methods. Using the existing (and crucially immutable) String class as keys helps you get this lookup functionality right.


Update: If you make your constructor private, as you mentioned, you can prevent the creation of new Company instances. Providing some other method of creating Company instances (Factory pattern) allows you ensure that 'new' Company instances are only really new if they are not already stored by name, otherwise the existing instance for a given name is returned (example of Singleton)

share|improve this answer
    
Actually, storing a String as the key isn't mathematically sufficient. It is mathematically possible for 2 different Strings to hash to the same value. –  John Engelman Sep 27 '10 at 21:18
5  
...which puts them in the same bucket, and the String equals() method takes over to ensure uniqueness...? –  Brabster Sep 27 '10 at 21:23
    
@John Actually it is sufficient. –  EJP Sep 28 '10 at 8:20

If the name of an object can change over time, consider including a generated unique ID for each object. Your mapping would be from name to unique ID, then from unique ID to the actual object.

By the way, if the objects were all known at compile time, you could use an Enum.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.