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What I'd like to do is label both of the geom_bar() 's in the following example with their respective data labels. So far, I can only get one or the other to show up:

dput():

x <- structure(list(variable = c("a", "b", "c"), f = c(0.98, 0.66, 
0.34), m = c(0.75760989010989, 0.24890977443609, 0.175125)), .Names = c("variable", 
"f", "m"), row.names = c(NA, 3L), class = "data.frame")

ggplot(x, aes(variable, f, label=paste(f*100,"%", sep=""))) + 
geom_bar() + 
geom_text(size=3, hjust=1.3, colour="white") +
geom_bar(aes(variable, m, label=paste(m*100,"%",sep="")), fill="purple") + 
coord_flip()

Multilayered Bar Graph

See how on the inside of the black there is a data label. In the same plot, I'd like to do the same thing on the inside of the purple.

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2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

how does this work for you:

ggplot(x, aes(variable, f, label=paste(f*100,"%", sep=""))) + 
geom_bar() + 
geom_text(size=3, hjust=1.3, colour="white") +
geom_bar(aes(variable, m, label=paste(m*100,"%",sep="")), fill="purple") + 
geom_text(aes(y=m,label=paste(round(m*100),"%",sep="")),size=3, hjust=1.3, colour="white") +
coord_flip()
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I was very close! I tried this layering of geom_text() but with a slight different aesthetic. Thanks! –  Brandon Bertelsen Sep 27 '10 at 23:08
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You may want to consider a different approach.

If the main goal of the graph is to compare the lengths/positions of the bars, then including numbers in the bars produces "fuzzy" bars making it harder for the eye/brain to properly judge the length/position of the bar.

If the main goal is to compare the numbers, then what you have is a poorly laid out table (with colorful background), it is easier to compare the numbers if they line up properly.

Some alternatives would include having a seperate graph and table (both properly laid out), or put the numbers in the margin (properly aligned) rather than on top of the bars, or create a table with barplots in marginal cells. You may also want to consider a dot plot rather than a bar plot (ggplot2 should still do this easily), stacked bars allow reasonable comparison of only the 1st (leftmost) category and the total, in your example it is not easy to compare the relative size of the black portion of the top and bottom bars.

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Personally, my vote was for a dotplot, but there are some things bosses just won't let you change. –  Brandon Bertelsen Sep 28 '10 at 16:51
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