Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

One for the mathematicians. This has gone around the office and we want to see who can come up with a better optimised version.

(((a+p) <= b) && (a == 0 || a > 1) && (b >= p)) && 
    ((b - (a + p) == 0) || (b - (a + p) > 1))

Edit: all data is positive int's

Edit: Better == refactored for simplicity

share|improve this question
    
Are there any constraints on the variables? E.g. integer type, implicit int->bool conversion, etc? –  mkoeller Dec 19 '08 at 12:56
    
What types are those variables? int? float? –  Joachim Sauer Dec 19 '08 at 12:56
    
That is not an algorithm. It is a function. –  Brian Genisio Dec 19 '08 at 12:56
    
And could you please give a hint on your definition of "better"? –  mkoeller Dec 19 '08 at 12:57
1  
Just wanted to plug: codegolf.stackexchange.com I suspect the question is even more suited there :) –  The Unfun Cat Nov 13 '12 at 8:45

27 Answers 27

up vote 37 down vote accepted
(a + p <= b) && (a != 1) && (b - a - p != 1);
share|improve this answer
    
Passes my test (All possible combination of 0-200) –  Brian Genisio Dec 19 '08 at 14:16
    
how do you get from (b >= p)) && ((b - (a + p) != 1) to (b - a - p != 1) ...I can see that the last terms are equivalent, but how do you remove the b>=p? –  frankodwyer Dec 19 '08 at 14:47
    
a+p<=b implies b>=p. a+p<=b => b>=p+a –  Loki Dec 19 '08 at 14:48
    
hmm...i see how a+b <= b is equivalent to b>=a+p but it took me a while to see how that implies b>=p...together with the fact a>=0 yes I see your point. –  frankodwyer Dec 19 '08 at 15:00
    
that a+b in my comment above should of course read a+p! –  frankodwyer Dec 19 '08 at 15:09

If the formula works and come from your business rules there is no real need to simplify it. The compiler probably knows better than us how to optimizing the formula.

The only thing you should do is use better variables names which reflect the business logic.

Beware of applying any of the proposed solution before unit testing them.

share|improve this answer
    
I agree with that. Especially if the formula came from some sort of scientific paper. You want those types of formulas to read verbatim, so you can cite the source. –  Brian Genisio Dec 19 '08 at 14:18
    
Huh. "Do not use brain"? Simplifying overcomplicated conditionals is not 'optimization', it is refactoring / improving clarity. –  ShreevatsaR Dec 19 '08 at 15:36
    
What if it isn't compiled? It could be in a script that doesn't optimize. –  shank Dec 19 '08 at 15:47
    
@Brian - Good point on the sources, but scientific papers usually give the simplest form of an equation in the paper. Generally, those formulas tend to get a bit longer when you code them up. –  SecretSquirrel Dec 19 '08 at 15:55
    
Absolutely. It's not overcomplicated if the business rule itself is reflected meaningfully in the current configuration (which would be obvious with better variable names...) –  Dan Vinton Dec 19 '08 at 19:06

Refactor for simplicity by introducing more local variables which indicate the meaning of each expression. This is hard for us to do with no idea of what a, b and p mean.

share|improve this answer
    
Ha, downvotes for your totally correct and not at all wrong idea... –  jjnguy Dec 19 '08 at 15:20
    
I'm reading Uncle Bob's Clean Code atm and this code could have been one of the before pictures for refactoring methods. –  Brian Rasmussen Dec 19 '08 at 19:55
    
Great answer. Build functions with good names--yours is the right answer. –  rp. Dec 20 '08 at 2:49
    
changing the names of a, b, and p does not remove the need to simplify this unnecessarily complex conditional expression; adding intermediate variables would, in fact, make the simplifacation more difficult. –  Steven A. Lowe Dec 20 '08 at 18:35
    
I strongly suspect that adding intermediate variables would make it simpler to understand - which helps it to be simplified afterwards. Note that I didn't just recommend changing the names of the variables - extract common expressions and give them a meaningful name. –  Jon Skeet Dec 20 '08 at 18:53
b >= p && b != p+1

EDIT: Ok, that didn't work, but this one does:

a != 1 && b >= a+p && b-a-p != 1
share|improve this answer
    
How did you get rid of the "(a == 0 || a > 1)" part? –  PEZ Dec 19 '08 at 13:21
    
a is irrelevant. nevertheless, my solution doesn't work. –  Can Berk Güder Dec 19 '08 at 13:23
    
Second one works, good work. :-) –  Tom Wijsman Dec 19 '08 at 14:03
    
@TomWij: yeah, it turns out a isn't so irrelevant after all =)) –  Can Berk Güder Dec 19 '08 at 14:05
(a!=1) && ((b==a+p) || (b>1+a+p))

It may not the simplest, but should be the one of most readable.

share|improve this answer
    
Readability can't be underrated! –  PEZ Dec 19 '08 at 16:12

I wouldnt do all math in that expression. Such as b - ( a + p ) is evaluated twice. If possible, split them into variables instead.

Also, writing a polish notiation tree might help you optimize it, everything that you see twice, can be re-used.

share|improve this answer

Since they are all positive ints a lot of the repetition can be removed:

So as a first step,

(((a+p) <= b) && (a == 0 || a > 1) && (b >= p)) && ((b - (a + p) == 0) || (b - (a + p) > 1))

becomes

((a+p) <= b) && (a != 1) && (b >= p)) && ((b - (a + p) != 1)

For clarity, this is just replacing the (foo == 0 || foo > 1) pattern with foo != 1

That pattern appears twice above, once with foo = a, and once with foo = (b - (a+p))

share|improve this answer
    
Fails on a = 0, b = 0, p = 1 –  Tom Wijsman Dec 19 '08 at 13:49
    
how? both should be false because they have the same b>=p condition, which is false, and makes the major && condition false. –  frankodwyer Dec 19 '08 at 14:01
    
@TomWij: a and b cannot be = 0, they are both positive integers (which means > 0) –  Steven A. Lowe Dec 20 '08 at 18:36
    
since the original code includes "a == 0", then I think it's safe to assume he meant "non-negative integers", not "positive integers" –  nickf Dec 30 '08 at 14:42

Since the ints are unsigned, (a==0 || a>1) can be substituted for (a !=1).

With a first pass, you can reduce it to this:

uint sum = a + p;
return ((sum <= b) && (a != 1) && (b >= p)) && (b - sum != 1);

Also, it would be much more readable if you were able to give more meaningful names to the variables. For instance, if a and p were pressures, then a+p could be substitued as PressureSum.

share|improve this answer
    
Fails on a = 0, b = 2, p = 1 –  Tom Wijsman Dec 19 '08 at 13:49
    
No, it does not fail. I just tested it. Both implementations return false on Function(0, 2, 1). Please retract that comment. –  Brian Genisio Dec 19 '08 at 13:58
    
@TomWij: a cannot be = 0, it is a positive integer (which means > 0) –  Steven A. Lowe Dec 20 '08 at 18:37
bap = b - (a + p)
bap >= 0 && bap != 1 && a != 1

EDIT: Now I've got -2 for an honest attempt at helping out and also for what seems to me to be a valid answer. For you who can use Python, here are two functions, one with the question and one with my answer:

def question(a, b, p):
    return (((a+p) <= b) and (a == 0 or a > 1) and (b >= p)) or ((b - (a + p) == 0) or (b - (a + p) > 1))

def answer(a, b, p):
    bap = b - (a + p)
    return bap >= 0 and bap != 1 and a != 1
share|improve this answer
    
fails on a = 9, b = 9, p = 9 –  nickf Dec 19 '08 at 13:44
    
Fails on a = 0, b = 0, p = 1 –  Tom Wijsman Dec 19 '08 at 13:48
    
ok looks like you've fixed it! –  nickf Dec 19 '08 at 13:49
    
How does it fail on those? –  PEZ Dec 19 '08 at 13:50
1  
yep i've just tested this on all combinations of 0-199 which is 8 million tests (overkill i know), and it works. –  nickf Dec 19 '08 at 15:06

This is as simple as I could get it.

def calc(a, b, p):
    if (a != 1):
        temp = a - b + p
        if temp == 0 or temp < -1:
            return True
    return False

It could also be written as:

def calc(a, b, p):
    temp = a - b + p
    return a != 1 and (temp == 0 or temp < -1)

Or as:

def calc(a, b, p):
    temp = a - b + p
    return a != 1 and temp <= 0 and temp != -1
share|improve this answer
    
What language, pray tell? –  Nate Parsons Dec 20 '08 at 3:27
// In one line:
return (a != 1) && ((b-a-p == 0) || (b-a-p > 1))

// Expanded for the compiler:
if(a == 1)
    return false;

int bap = b - a - p;

return (bap == 0) || (bap > 1);

If you post the processor you are using, I can optimize for assembly. =]

share|improve this answer

jjngy up here has it right. Here's a proof that his simplified formula is equivalent to the original using the Coq Proof Assistant.

Require Import Arith.
Require Import Omega.

Lemma eq : forall (a b p:nat),
(((a+p) <= b) /\ ((a = 0) \/ (a > 1)) /\ (b >= p)) /\ 
    ((b - (a + p) = 0) \/ (b - (a + p) > 1)) <-> 
((a + p <= b) /\ ~ (a= 1) /\ ~ (b - a - p = 1)).
Proof. intros; omega. Qed.
share|improve this answer

my apologies for the mistake in the original derivation. This is what happens when you don't bother to unit test after refactoring!

the corrected derivation follows, in the form of a test program.

The short answer is:

((a > 1) && (skeet == 0)) || ((a > 1) && (jon > 0) && (skeet < -1));

where

jon = (b - p)
skeet = (a - jon);


class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        bool ok = true;
        for (int a = 1; a < 100; a++)
        {
            Console.Write(a.ToString());
            Console.Write("...");

            for (int b = 1; b < 100; b++)
            {
                for (int p = 1; p < 100; p++)
                {
                    bool[] results = testFunctions(a, b, p);
                    if (!allSame(results))
                    {
                        Console.WriteLine(string.Format(
                            "Fails for {0},{1},{2}", a, b, p));
                        for (int i = 1; i <= results.Length; i++)
                        {
                            Console.WriteLine(i.ToString() + ": " + 
                                results[i-1].ToString());
                        }

                        ok = false;
                        break;
                    }
                }
                if (!ok) { break; }
            }
            if (!ok) { break; }
        }
        if (ok) { Console.WriteLine("Success"); }
        else { Console.WriteLine("Failed!"); }
        Console.ReadKey();
    }

    public static bool allSame(bool[] vals)
    {
        bool firstValue = vals[0];
        for (int i = 1; i < vals.Length; i++)
        {
            if (vals[i] != firstValue)
            {
                return false;
            }
        }
        return true;
    }

    public static bool[] testFunctions(int a, int b, int p)
    {
        bool [] results = new bool[16];

        //given: all values are positive integers
        if (a<=0 || b<=0 || p<=0)
        {
            throw new Exception("All inputs must be positive integers!");
        }

        //[1] original expression
        results[0] = (((a+p) <= b) && (a == 0 || a > 1) && (b >= p)) && 
            ((b - (a + p) == 0) || (b - (a + p) > 1));

        //[2] a==0 cannot be true since a is a positive integer
        results[1] = (((a+p) <= b) && (a > 1) && (b >= p)) && 
            ((b - (a + p) == 0) || (b - (a + p) > 1));

        //[3] rewrite (b >= p) && ((a+p) <= b) 
        results[2] = (b >= p) && (b >= (a+p)) && (a > 1) && 
            ((b - (a + p) == 0) || (b - (a + p) > 1));

        //[4] since a is positive, (b>=p) guarantees (b>=(p+a)) so we 
        //can drop the latter term
        results[3] = (b >= p) && (a > 1) && 
            ((b - (a + p) == 0) || (b - (a + p) > 1));

        //[5] separate the two cases b>=p and b=p
        results[4] = ((b==p) && (a > 1) && ((b - (a + p) == 0) || 
            (b - (a + p) > 1))) || ((b > p) && (a > 1) && 
            ((b - (a + p) == 0) || (b - (a + p) > 1)));

        //[6] rewrite the first case to eliminate p (since b=p 
        //in that case)
        results[5] = ((b==p) && (a > 1) && ((-a == 0) || 
            (-a > 1))) || ((b > p) && (a > 1) && 
            (((b - a - p) == 0) || ((b - a - p) > 1)));

        //[7] since a>0, neither (-a=0) nor (-a>1) can be true, 
        //so the case when b=p is always false
        results[6] = (b > p) && (a > 1) && (((b - a - p) == 0) || 
            ((b - a - p) > 1));

        //[8] rewrite (b>p) as ((b-p)>0) and reorder the subtractions
        results[7] = ((b - p) > 0) && (a > 1) && (((b - p - a) == 0) || 
            ((b - p - a) > 1));

        //[9] define (b - p) as N temporarily
        int N = (b - p);
        results[8] = (N > 0) && (a > 1) && (((N - a) == 0) || ((N - a) > 1));

        //[10] rewrite the disjunction to isolate a
        results[9] = (N > 0) && (a > 1) && ((a == N) || (a < (N - 1)));

        //[11] expand the disjunction
        results[10] = ((N > 0) && (a > 1) && (a == N)) ||
            ((N > 0) && (a > 1) && (a < (N - 1)));

        //[12] since (a = N) in the first subexpression we can simplify to
        results[11] = ((a == N) && (a > 1)) || 
            ((N > 0) && (a > 1) && (a < (N - 1)));

        //[13] extract common term (a > 1) and replace N with (b - p)
        results[12] = (a > 1) && ((a == (b - p)) || 
            (((b - p) > 0) && (a < (b - p - 1))));

        //[14] extract common term (a > 1) and replace N with (b - p)
        results[13] = (a > 1) && (((a - b + p) == 0) || 
            (((b - p) > 0) && ((a - b + p) < -1)));

        //[15] replace redundant subterms with intermediate 
        //variables (to make Jon Skeet happy)
        int jon = (b - p);
        int skeet = (a - jon);   //(a - b + p) = (a - (b - p))
        results[14] = (a > 1) && ((skeet == 0) || 
            ((jon > 0) && (skeet < -1)));

        //[16] rewrite in disjunctive normal form
        results[15] = ((a > 1) && (skeet == 0)) || 
            ((a > 1) && (jon > 0) && (skeet < -1));

        return results;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
@Steven: (a == 0 || a > 1) cannot be reduced to (a > 1). It's (a != 1). –  wasker Dec 20 '08 at 1:13
    
@wasker - If we are assuming that 0 is neither negative or positive then (a > 1) and (a != 1) have the same truth table. –  SecretSquirrel Dec 20 '08 at 3:08
    
You say both "(a == 0 || a > 1) reduces to (a > 1)" and "N == 0 || N > 1 implies N >= 0 for positive integers", but neither is correct. Assuming a >=0 (as we're told), (a==0 || a > 1) reduces to a != 1, as many other posters have noted. –  Nate Parsons Dec 20 '08 at 3:35
    
Stephen A. Lowe is correct. The original question stated that the integers were positive. Therefore, zero is not a permissible value. Thus, (a==0 || a>1) => (a > 1). It's elementary! –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Dec 20 '08 at 4:03
    
I really can't believe so many people are missing this. I guess those crazy IEEE floats have confused people about how numbers work! –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Dec 20 '08 at 4:06
s = a + p
b >= s && a != 1 && b - s - 1 > 0

Checked, returns the same boolean value as the question.

Program that I have used to check: (had fun writing it)

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

typedef unsigned int uint;

bool condition(uint a, uint b, uint p)
{
    	uint s = a + p;
    	return uint(    b >= s && a != 1 && b - s - 1 > 0    )
    	== uint(    (((a+p) <= b) && (a == 0 || a > 1) && (b >= p))
                 && ((b - (a + p) == 0) || (b - (a + p) > 1))    );
}

void main()
{
    uint i = 0;
    uint j = 0;
    uint k = 0;

    const uint max = 50;

    for (uint i = 0; i <= max; ++i)
        for (uint j = 0; j <= max; ++j)
            for (uint k = 0; k <= max; ++k)
                if (condition(i, j, k) == false)
                {
                    cout << "Fails on a = " << i << ", b = " << j;
                    cout << ", p = " << k << endl;

                    int wait = 0;
                    cin >> wait;
                }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Way to go. EVen if I think "b - s > 1" is clearer. –  PEZ Dec 19 '08 at 14:07
    
No, doesn't work. –  Tom Wijsman Dec 19 '08 at 14:11
    
Using your test fixture, I do not get a failure on my solution, though you commented that It failed on 0,2,1 –  Brian Genisio Dec 19 '08 at 14:26
    
Clearer than "b - s - 1 > 0" that is. –  PEZ Dec 19 '08 at 14:26
    
What about 2,4,2: 4-(2+2)-1 = -1. Do you rely on overflow here? Nifty, but what if range checking is done? (By the way, this is why b-s>1 will not work,as 4-(2+2)=0 is valid by (b - (a + p) == 0).) –  malach Dec 19 '08 at 14:29

Well

((b - (a + p) == 0) || (b - (a + p) > 1))

Would be better writen as:
(b - (a + p) >= 0)  

Applying this to the whole string you get:

((a+p) <= b) && (a > 1) && (b >= p)) && (b - (a + p) >= 0) 


(a + p) <= b is the same thing as b - (a + p) >= 0

So you can get rid of that leaving:

((a+p) <= b) && (a > 1) && (b >= p))
share|improve this answer
    
That is wrong, you don't want (b - (a + p)) to be 1. –  Tom Wijsman Dec 19 '08 at 13:09
    
NO! ((b - (a + p) == 0) || (b - (a + p) > 1)) DOES NOT EQUAL (b - (a + p) >= 0) !!! The correct reduction is: (b - (a + p) != 1) –  Brian Genisio Dec 19 '08 at 13:10
    
a can == 0 so a > 1 woudln't suffice –  Adam Naylor Dec 19 '08 at 13:11
    
Fails on a = 0, b = 0, p = 0 –  Tom Wijsman Dec 19 '08 at 13:52

Tested with a,b,p from 0 to 10000:

a != 1 && a != (b-p-1) && a <= (b-p);

I think it can be simplified even more.

share|improve this answer

I added this as a comment to nickf's answer but thought I'd offer it up as an answer on it's own. The good answers all seem to be a variation of his, including mine. But since we're not depending on the compiler for optimization (if the OP were, we wouldn't even be doing this) then boiling this down from 3 ANDs to the following means that there will be values where only 2 of the 3 portions will need to be evaluated. And if this is being done in a script, it would make a difference as opposed to compiled code.

(a != 1) && ((b > (a + p + 1)) || (b == (a + p))))

Based on a comment, I'm going to add this wrt this being better than the AND version:

I guess it depends on whether your true results data set is larger than 50 percent of the input sets. The more often the input is true, the better my variation will be. So, with this equation, it looks like the AND style will be better (at least for my input data set of 0-500).

share|improve this answer
    
Won't a script process the &&'s conditionally anyhow...i.e. if it's A && B && C, it'll stop processing once one of them is false. substituting || just means it will stop if the first one is false, or if one of || terms is true. Not sure how this is an improvement. –  frankodwyer Dec 19 '08 at 16:25
    
Good point. I guess it depends on whether your true results data set is larger than 50 percent of the input sets. The more often the input is true, the better my variation will be. So, with this equation, it looks like the AND style will be better (at least for my input data set of 0-500). –  shank Dec 19 '08 at 16:47

If a, b and p are positive integers (assuming that the positive range include the 0 value) then the expression (((a+p) <= b) && (a == 0 || a > 1) && (b >= p)) && ((b - (a + p) == 0) || (b - (a + p) > 1)) can be reduced to ((a+p)<=b) && (a!=1) && ((b-(a+p))!=1)

Let me demonstrate it: In the first part of the expression there is a condition, ((a+p)<=b), that if valuated true render true the second part: ((b - (a + p) == 0) || (b - (a + p) > 1)). If it is true that (b >=(a+p)) then (b - (a+p)) have to be greater or equal to 0, we need to assure that (b-(a+p))!=1. Put this term aside for awhile and go on.

Now we can concentrate our efforts on the the first part (((a+p) <= b) && (a == 0 || a > 1) && (b >= p)) && ((b-(a+p))!=1)

If a is positive then it is always >=0 and so we can drop the test (a == 0 || a > 1) if favor of (a!=1) and reduce first part of the expression to (((a+p) <= b) && (b >= p) && (a!=1)).

For the next step of the reduction you can consider that if b >= (a+p) then, obviously b>=p (a is positive) and the expression can be reduced to

((a+p)<=b) && (a!=1) && ((b-(a+p))!=1)

share|improve this answer
    
"Assuming the positive range includes the 0 value". Can we also throw in the square root of negative one? Because it's a cool number too! –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Dec 20 '08 at 4:09
    
It is not an integer though ;) –  Eineki Dec 28 '08 at 23:23

how is about the following logic, please comment it:

((a == 0 || a > 1) && ((b-p) > 1) )
share|improve this answer

Alright, I'm hoping that I did my math right here, but if I'm right, then this simplifies quite a bit. Granted it doesn't look the same in the end, but the core logic should be the same.

// Initial equation
(((a + p) <= b) && (a == 0 || a > 1) && (b >= p)) && ((b - (a + p) == 0) || (b - (a + p) > 1))

// ((a + p) <= b) iif a = 0 && p = b; therefore, b = p and a = 0 for this to work
(b == p) && ((b - (a + p) == 0) || (b - (a + p) > 1))

// Simplification, assuming that b = p and a = 0
(b == p) && (a == 0)

However, if we are operating under the assumption that zero is neither positive or negative then that implies that any value for a provided to the equation is going to be greater than or equal to one. This in turn means that the equation will always evaluate to false due to the fact that the following:

(a == 0 || a > 1)

Would only evaluate to true when a >= 2; however, if the following is also true:

(b >= p)

Then that means that p is at least equal to b, thus:

((a + p) <= b)

By substitution becomes:

((2 + b) <= b)

Which can clearly never evaluate to true.

share|improve this answer
    
b - (a + p) >= 0). this is not true; b - (a + p ) cannot be equal to 1 –  Ali Ersöz Dec 19 '08 at 14:37
    
@yapiskan - Opps, thanks for catching that –  SecretSquirrel Dec 19 '08 at 14:40
    
;) and why did you escape the a > 1 part in "(a == 0 || a > 1)" statement. –  Ali Ersöz Dec 19 '08 at 15:04
    
@yapiskan - If I'm assuming that ((a + p) <= b) when (b = p) and (a = 0) then there is no reason to check to see if (a > 1) as the equation would then allow for ((a + b) <= b) where (a > 1), which is clearly false. –  SecretSquirrel Dec 19 '08 at 15:14

(((a+p) <= b) && (a == 0 || a > 1) && (b >= p)) && ((b - (a + p) == 0) || (b - (a + p) > 1))

1) (a == 0 || a > 1) is (a != 1)

2) (b >= p) is (b - p >= 0)

(a + p <= b) is (b - p >= a), which is stronger than (b - p >= 0).

First condition reduced to (a != 1) && (b - p >= a).

3) (b - (a + p) == 0) is (b - a - p == 0) is (b - p == a).

(b - (a + p) > 1) is (b - a - p > 1) is (b - p > 1 + a).

Since we had (b - p >= a) and we're using && operation, we may say that (b - p >= a) covers (b - p == a && b - p > 1 + a).

Hence, the whole condition will be reduced to

(a != 1 && (b - p >= a))

There's a tempation to reduce it further to (b >= p), but this reduction won't cover prohibition of b = p + 1, therefore (a != 1 && (b - p >= a)) is the condition.

share|improve this answer

This question has been pretty comfortably answered already in practice, but there is one point I mention below which I have not seen anyone else raise yet.

Since we were told to assume a >= 0, and the first condition assures that b - (a + p) >= 0, the bracketed || tests can be turned into tests against inequality with 1:

(a + p <= b) && (a != 1) && (b >= p) && (b - a - p != 1)

It is tempting to remove the check (b >= p), which would give nickf's expression. And this is almost certainly the correct practical solution. Unfortunately, we need to know more about the problem domain before being able to say if it is safe to do that.

For instance, if using C and 32-bit unsigned ints for the types of a, b, and p, consider the case where a = 2^31 + 7, p = 2^31 + 5, b = 13. We have a > 0, (a + p) = 12 < b, but b < p. (I'm using '^' to indicate exponentiation, not C bitwise xor.)

Probably your values will not approach the kind of ranges where this sort of overflow is an issue, but you should check this assumption. And if it turns out to be a possibility, add a comment with that expression explaining this so that some zealous future optimiser does not carelessly remove the (b >= p) test.

share|improve this answer
    
a is a positive integer, which means a>0 not a >= 0 –  Steven A. Lowe Dec 20 '08 at 19:01

I feel (a != 1) && (a + p <= b) && (a + p != b - 1) is slightly more clear. Another option is:

int t = b-p; (a != 1 && a <= t && a != t-1)

Basically a is either 0, t, or lies between 2 and t-2 inclusive.

share|improve this answer

a!=1 && ((b == a + p) || (b - p > a + 1))

share|improve this answer

First iteration:

bool bool1 = ((a+p) <= b) && (a == 0 || a > 1) && (b >= p);
bool bool2 = (b - (a + p) == 0) || (b - (a + p) > 1);

return bool1 && bool2;

Second iteration:

int value1 = b - (a + p);
bool bool1 = (value1 >= 0) && (a == 0 || a > 1) && (b >= p);
bool bool2 = (value1 == 0) || (value1 > 1);

return bool1 && bool2;

Third iteration (all positives)

int value1 = b - (a + p);
bool bool1 = (value1 >= 0) && (a != 1) && (b >= p);
bool bool2 = (value1 == 0) || (value1 > 1);

return bool1 && bool2;

4th iteration (all positives)

int value2 = b - p;
int value1 = value2 - a;
bool bool1 = (value1 >= 0) && (a != 1) && (b - p >= 0);
bool bool2 = (value1 == 0) || (value1 > 1);

return bool1 && bool2;

5th iteration:

int value2 = b - p;
int value1 = value2 - a;
bool bool1 = (value1 >= 0) && (a != 1) && (value2 >= 0);
bool bool2 = (value1 == 0) || (value1 > 1);

return bool1 && bool2;
share|improve this answer
    
this is the first one i've seen which actually works, but it's hard to call it a simplification... –  nickf Dec 19 '08 at 13:36
    
Simplification for who? For the compiler or for the human? For the compiler there's no need. For the human just uses meaningful names instead of value1 and value2. –  Andrea Francia Dec 19 '08 at 13:41
1  
Uh, you made it longer. xD –  Tom Wijsman Dec 19 '08 at 13:52
b >= (a+p) && a>=1

even b >= p is redundant as this will always be the case for a >= 1

share|improve this answer
    
A is allowed to be 0. –  PEZ Dec 19 '08 at 20:06
1  
@PEZ: no, it isn't. positive integers start at 1. see mathworld.wolfram.com/PositiveInteger.html or wiki.answers.com/Q/What_is_a_positive_integer –  Steven A. Lowe Dec 20 '08 at 19:00
(((a+p) <= b) && (a == 0 || a > 1) && (b >= p)) && ((b - (a + p) == 0) || (b - (a + p) > 1))

since a >=0 (positive integers), the term (a == 0 || a > 1) is always true

if ((a+p) <= b) then (b >= p) is true when a,b,p are >=0

therefore ((a+p) <= b) && (a == 0 || a > 1) && (b >= p)) && ((b - (a + p) == 0) reduces to

b>=(a+p)

(b - (a + p) == 0) || (b - (a + p) > 1) is equivalent to b>=(a+p)

therefore the whole equation reduces to

**b>= (a+p)**
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.