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Given that x = 2, y = 1, and z = 0, what will the following statement display?

printf("answer = %d\n", (x || !y && z));

it was on a quiz and i got it wrong, i dont remember my professor covering this, someone enlighten me please... i know the answer i get is 1, but why?

thnx

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5  
"what will the following statement display?" Go run it yourself... yikes. If you then don't understand and want to ask "why?", that's a reasonable question. –  Tony D Sep 28 '10 at 3:13
    
i know, i did, but that doesnt explain to me the logic behind the operation :/ –  NetSkay Sep 28 '10 at 3:17
    
Possibly duplicate: stackoverflow.com/questions/3375041 –  jweyrich Sep 28 '10 at 3:23

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The expression is interpreted as x || (!y &&z)(check out the precedence of the operators ||, ! and &&.

|| is a short-circuiting operator. If the left operand is true (in case of ||) the right side operand need not be evaluated.

In your case x is true, so being a boolean expression the result would be 1.

EDIT.

The order of evaluation of && and || is guaranteed to be from left to right.

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Would you care explaining "short-circuiting"? –  thyrgle Sep 28 '10 at 3:13
    
See the edits (link). –  Prasoon Saurav Sep 28 '10 at 3:14
2  
short-circuit boolean evaluation means that if the left-hand side value is enough to determine the truth of the entire expression, then the right-hand values aren't evaluated at all. This is both an optimisation, and essential when checking say a pointer is not null on the left, then dereferencing it on the right. For || - the OR operator - if the left hand value is true then the entire expression is true, and the right-hand part unevaluated. –  Tony D Sep 28 '10 at 3:18
1  
@Tony: whether or not the right-hand part is evaluated is irrelevant since it has no side-effects. What matters is that && has higher precedence (i.e. binds more tightly) than ||. –  R.. Sep 28 '10 at 3:24
    
ohh ok that makes sense, thnx a lot! –  NetSkay Sep 28 '10 at 3:26

If I'm not mistaken, it will print 1. (Let's assume short circuiting is off)

(x || !y && z) or (true || !true && false) will first evaluate the ! operator giving (true || false && false)

Then the &&: (true || false)

Then || : true

Printf will interpret true in decimal as 1. So it will print answer = 1\n

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1  
The ! will not be evaluated first! x will be. –  Jonathan Leffler Sep 28 '10 at 3:18
3  
Wrong - see Prasoon's answer and consider short-circuit evaluation. –  Tony D Sep 28 '10 at 3:19
    
Note I said assume no short circuiting. But otherwise you are correct. I thought he might want a more thorough answer. –  JoshD Sep 28 '10 at 3:24
3  
if your compiler permits disabling short-circuiting, please, delete it. –  jweyrich Sep 28 '10 at 3:32
    
@jweyrich: Indeed I would delete it. My intent was to illustrate the order of operations to a learning student. –  JoshD Sep 28 '10 at 3:57

Given that x = 2, y = 1, and z = 0, what will the following statement display?

printf("answer = %d\n", (x || !y && z));

Ok - feeling a bit guilty for the harsh quip re poor wording of the question, so I'll try to help you in a different way to the other answers... :-)

When you've a question like this, break it down into manageable chunks.

Try:

int x = 2, y = 1, z = 0;

printf("true == %d\n", 10 > 2);                 // prints "1"
printf("false == %d\n", 1 == 2);                // prints "0"
printf("!y == %d\n", !y);                       // prints "0"
printf("(x || !y) == %d\n", x || !y);           // "1" - SEE COMMENTS BELOW
printf("(!y || z) == %d\n", !y || z);           // "0"
printf("(x || !y && z) == %d\n", x || !y && z); // "1"

In the output there, you've got everything you need to deduce what's happening:

  • true == 1 reveals how C/C++ convert truthful boolean expressions to the integral value 1 for printf, irrespective of the values appearing in the boolean expression
  • false == 0 reveals how C/C++ converts false expressions to "0"
  • (!y) == 0 because ! is the logical not operator, and C/C++ consider 0 to be the only integral value corresponding to false, while all others are true, so !1 == !true == false == 0
  • (x || !y) == 1, and you know !y is 0, so substituting known values and simplifying: (2 || 0) == 1 is equivalent to (true or false) == true... that's understandable as a logical rule
  • (!y || z) == 0 - substituting known values: (0 || 0) == (false or false) == false == 0
  • (x || !y && z) == 1: here's the crunch! From above, we know:
    • x || !y is 1/true, which if relevant would imply 1/true && z/0/false == 1/true <- this clearly doesn't make any sense, so it must not be the way C/C++ are calculating the answer!
    • (!y && z) is false, which if relevant would imply x/2/true || false == 1/true <- this is true, so it must be the implicit order.

In this way, we've derived the operator precedence - the order of evaluation of the || and && operators, from the results that the compiler is displaying, and seen that if and only if && is valuated before || then we can make some sense of the results.

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answer = 1

or maybe:

answer = -27

2 || !1 && 0

2 || 0 && 0

2 || 0

true

true = non-zero value

printf("answer = %d",true); -> who knows

Most compilers will output "answer = 1". I wouldn't confidently state that all compilers will do that though, but I am confident all compilers would return non-zero.

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3  
Wrong, short-circuiting is irrelevant. That's only a matter of whether side effects occur. This is a simple operator precedence problem. If you don't believe me, try replacing && with , (the comma operator). :-) –  R.. Sep 28 '10 at 3:22
    
@R - Comment verified. Post updated. –  PatrickV Sep 28 '10 at 3:35
1  
No, the answer is always 1. The result of logical AND and OR is always an int with the value 0 or 1. C++ is the same, except that the type is bool, which gets promoted to an int when passed to printf. –  Derek Ledbetter Sep 28 '10 at 3:53
    
Now you're wrong for a new reason. The answer is always 1. Result of logical operators in C is well-defined as 0 or 1; it's not an implementation issue. –  R.. Sep 28 '10 at 3:58
    
@R.: the question is tagged C and C++ –  Jens Gustedt Sep 28 '10 at 8:10

I'm not going to give you the outright answer because you could just compile it and run it, but the question is just testing to see if you know operator precedence.

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