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I have a method fetchObjects(String) that is expected to return an array of Contract business objects. The className parameter tells me what kind of business objects I should return (of course this doesn't make sense in this construed case because I already said I will return Contracts, but it's basically the situation I have in my real scenario). So I get the set of entries from somewhere and load the class of the collection's entries (the type of which is specified by className).

Now I need to construct the array to return, so I use Set's toArray(T[]) method. Using reflection, I build myself an empty Contracts array. But, this gives me a value of static type Object! So next I need to cast it to the appropriate type, which in this case is Contract[] (see "asterisk-underlined" part in the listing below).

My question is: Is there a way, and how, to cast to Contract[] as I do in the listing, but determining the type of the array elements (Contract) only through className (or entriesType)? In other words, what I'd like to do is basically casting like this: (entriesType[]) valueWithStaticTypeObject, where entriesType be replaced by the class specified through the classname parameter, i.e. Contract.

Is this somehow inherently impossible, or can it be done somehow? Maybe using generics?

package xx.testcode;

import java.util.HashSet;
import java.util.Set;

class TypedArrayReflection {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        try {
            Contract[] contracts = fetchObjects("Contract");
            System.out.println(contracts.length);
        } catch (ClassNotFoundException e) {}
    }

    static Contract[] fetchObjects(String className) throws ClassNotFoundException {
        Class<?> entriesType = Class.forName("xx.testcode."+className);
        Set<?> entries = ObjectManager.getEntrySet(className); 
        return entries.toArray( 
                (Contract[]) java.lang.reflect.Array.newInstance(
                /********/          entriesType, entries.size()) );
    }
}

class Contract { } // business object

class ObjectManager {
    static Set<?> getEntrySet(String className) {
        if (className.equals("Contract"))
            return new HashSet<Contract>();
        return null; // Error
    }
}

Thanks.


Update: Using the type-safe method toArray, taken from CodeIdol, I updated my fetchObjects method thus:

static Contract[] fetchObjects(String className) throws ClassNotFoundException {
	Class<?> entriesType = Class.forName("xx.testcode."+className);
	Set<?> entries = ObjectManager.getEntrySet(className);
	return toArray(entries, entriesType); // compile error
	// -> "method not applicable for (Set<capture#3-of ?>, Class<capture#4-of ?>)"
}

public static <T> T[] toArray(Collection<T> c, Class<T> k) {
	T[] a = (T[]) java.lang.reflect.Array.newInstance(k, c.size());
	int i = 0;
	for (T x : c)
		a[i++] = x;
	return a;
}

What do I need to do to get rid of the compiler error quoted in the comment? Do I absolutely have to specify Set<Contract> in the return type of my getEntrySet method so that this can work? Thanks for any pointers.

share|improve this question
    
How to you handle when the class entriesType is not a subclass of Contract? –  Dennis Cheung Dec 19 '08 at 14:52
    
entriesType is not necessarily a subtype of Contract. It could be Pet, Friend, Hobby - anything that you might have a collection of. In my example case a Customer would have a collection of Contracts. –  Yang Meyer Dec 19 '08 at 15:03

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You may use the class as the parameter rather then the class name.

   static <T extends Contract> T[] buildArray(Class<T> clazz){
     ArrayList<T> l=new ArrayList<T>();
     return l.toArray((T[]) java.lang.reflect.Array.newInstance(clazz, l.size()));
   }

EDIT: (after read Yang comment)

No, You cannot use generic type with the value of a variable.

share|improve this answer
    
This is pretty impressive! However the thing is that I don't want to hard-codedly specify the Contract class (the business object could just as well be House or Pet, depending on the method parameter className). The right class needs to be determined from the className parameter. –  Yang Meyer Dec 19 '08 at 13:51
    
Since the caller would have to know what type of object he expects, anyway, why not pass in the Class object instead of the name? I don't get what advantage the name has. –  Joachim Sauer Dec 19 '08 at 14:44
    
Cf. my comment to Milhous' answer. –  Yang Meyer Dec 19 '08 at 15:00

So why not use

static <T> T[] buildArray(Class<T> clazz){
ArrayList<T> l=new ArrayList<T>();
return l.toArray((T[]) java.lang.reflect.Array.newInstance(clazz, l.size()));
}

Note. Modified the code from above.

share|improve this answer
    
I think he may wants that the generics <T> is base on the value of "String className", without a typed/generics/class parameter. –  Dennis Cheung Dec 19 '08 at 14:51
    
Exactly. In the real scenario, I need to use reflection to get the name of the type, e.g. I get "Contract" from reflection and then load the class with this name. –  Yang Meyer Dec 19 '08 at 14:59
3  
You cannot typecast to a type which is unknown at compile-time. Typecasting is a compile-time issue. Generics is just a way of parameterizing the typecast, to let the compiler propagate type-information from one part of the code to another. But it still needs to be known to the compiler. –  Rolf Rander Dec 19 '08 at 15:29

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