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With the following code sample, can super be used, or C has to call A.foo and B.foo explicitly?

class A(object):
    def foo(self):
        print 'A.foo()'

class B(object):
    def foo(self):
        print 'B.foo()'

class C(A, B):
    def foo(self):
        print 'C.foo()'
        A.foo(self)
        B.foo(self)
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5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

super() will only ever resolve a single class type for a given method, so if you're inheriting from multiple classes and want to call the method in both of them, you'll need to do it explicitly.

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Thanks for the answer. Now I don't feel dirty anymore for not using super(). –  sayap Sep 28 '10 at 7:31
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super is indeed intended for this situation, but it only works if you use it consistently. If the base classes don't also all use super it won't work, and unless the method is in object you have to use something like a common base class to terminate the chain of super calls.

class FooBase(object):
    def foo(self): pass

class A(FooBase):
    def foo(self):
        super(A, self).foo()
        print 'A.foo()'

class B(FooBase):
    def foo(self):
        super(B, self).foo()
        print 'B.foo()'

class C(A, B):
    def foo(self):
        super(C, self).foo()
        print 'C.foo()'
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I think this is a much more informative answer than the one accepted. Could you expand on why one needs the common base class to make this work? –  Marcin May 13 at 14:59
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Super will call the foo method on the "first" super class. This is based on the Method Resolution Order (__mro__) for the class C.

>>> C.__mro__
(<class '__main__.C'>, <class '__main__.A'>, <class '__main__.B'>, <type 'object'>)
>>> 

Therefore if you call super(C, self).foo(), A.foo is called. If you change the inheritance order to class C(B, A): then this is reversed. The __mro__ now looks like:

>>> C.__mro__
(<class '__main__.C'>, <class '__main__.B'>, <class '__main__.A'>, <type 'object'>)
>>> 

If you call super(C, self).foo() after making this change, B.foo() will get called.

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yay for introspection –  bronzebeard Sep 28 '10 at 8:00
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If you added the following:

class A(object):
    def foo(self):
        print 'A.foo()'

class B(object):
    def foo(self):
        print 'B.foo()'

class C(A, B):
    def foo(self):
        super(C, self).foo()
        print 'C.foo()'
        A.foo(self)
        B.foo(self)


c = C()
c.foo()

Then super(C, self).foo() refers to A.foo

The output is

A.foo()
C.foo()
A.foo()
B.foo()

[Edit: Include additional information and links]

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Yes, that was my question. So super is not meant for this case? –  sayap Sep 28 '10 at 7:12
    
@sayap : I have edited my answer to include links that are relevant for understanding how super works. It works but it will find A.foo first and if A.foo was not there than B.foo would have been looked into. –  pyfunc Sep 28 '10 at 7:16
    
Why would I want to have A.foo() called twice? –  sayap Sep 28 '10 at 7:27
    
@sayap: This is just an example. That shows that super uses MRO to find the foo to be called. This could be search for A.foo then B.foo. If you have a requirement that both A.foo and B.foo should be called, call the explicitly or else you expect one of the base classes to implement foo then call super(..).foo. In this case, you just expect one of them to implement foo. –  pyfunc Sep 28 '10 at 7:32
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This is possible with super

class A(object):
    def foo(self):
        print 'A.foo()'

class B(object):
    def foo(self):
        print 'B.foo()'

class C(A, B):
    def foo(self):
        print 'C.foo()'
        super(C, self).foo() # calls A.foo()
        super(A, self).foo() # calls B.foo()
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So what do you gain by calling super(C, self).foo() or super(A, self).foo() instead of A.foo() or B.foo()? –  FooF Dec 31 '13 at 7:29
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