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I'm writing some Enum functionality, and have the following:

public static T ConvertStringToEnumValue<T>(string valueToConvert, 
    bool isCaseSensitive)
{
    if (String.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(valueToConvert))
        return (T)typeof(T).TypeInitializer.Invoke(null);

    valueToConvert = valueToConvert.Replace(" ", "");
    if (typeof(T).BaseType.FullName != "System.Enum" &&
        typeof(T).BaseType.FullName != "System.ValueType")
    {
        throw new ArgumentException("Type must be of Enum and not " +
            typeof (T).BaseType.FullName);
    }

    if (typeof(T).BaseType.FullName == "System.ValueType")
    {
        return (T)Enum.Parse(Nullable.GetUnderlyingType(typeof(T)),
            valueToConvert, !isCaseSensitive);
    }

    return (T)Enum.Parse(typeof(T), valueToConvert, !isCaseSensitive);
}

I now call this with the following:

EnumHelper.ConvertStringToEnumValue<Enums.Animals?>("Cat");

This works as expected. However, if I run this:

EnumHelper.ConvertStringToEnumValue<Enums.Animals?>(null);

it breaks with the error that the TypeInitializer is null.

Does anyone know how to solve this?

Thanks all!

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1  
Why on earth are you invoking the type initializer?? In my 9 years of C#, I have never needed to do that! –  leppie Sep 28 '10 at 8:37
    
In fact that type initializer does not even return anything. The code is bogus, sorry. –  leppie Sep 28 '10 at 8:38
1  
@leppie, hence my posting of the question. I am looking for a way to do the above, and clearly the TypeInitializer isn't the correct way of doing this. The below answer from Preet is what I was looking for. –  Richard Sep 28 '10 at 8:51
    
@leppie: he's asking a question to find a better way. Isn't that what SO is all about? Why so admonishing? –  Kent Boogaart Sep 28 '10 at 9:12
    
May i suggest you read up on the Type API. You should avoid using string comparison on types. For instance, typeof(T).BaseType.FullName != "System.Enum" may be better written as !typeof(T).IsEnum. Also typeof(T).BaseType.FullName != "System.ValueType" may be better written as !typeof(T).IsValueType. –  Bear Monkey Sep 28 '10 at 9:23

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

try

if (String.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(valueToConvert))
              return default(T);
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