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I have this code behind:

CustomUserControl.xaml.cs

namespace MyProject
{
    public partial class CustomUserControl<T> : UserControl
    {
        ...
    }
}

and this xaml:

CustomUserControl.xaml

<UserControl x:Class="MyProject.CustomUserControl"
         xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
         xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
         xmlns:sys="clr-namespace:System;assembly=mscorlib">
<Grid>

</Grid>

It doesn't work since the x:Class="MyProject.CustomUserControl" doesn't match the code-behind's generic class definition. Is there some way to make this work?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Unfortunately XAML does not support generic code behind, thou you can walk around this.

See links below:

http://forums.silverlight.net/forums/p/29051/197576.aspx

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/185349/can-i-specify-a-generic-type-in-xaml

May be generic controls will be supported natively in future versions of Visual Studuo with XAML 2009.

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You can create generic "code-behind" file without XAML-file:

public class CustomUserControl<T>: UserControl
{ }

and than derive from it providing specific class as a parameter:

public partial class SpecificUserControl : CustomUserControl<Presenter>
{
    public SpecificUserControl()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
    }
}

XAML:

<application:CustomUserControl 
     x:TypeArguments="application:Presenter"
     xmlns:application="clr-namespace:YourApplicationNamespace"
...

Unfortunately, it seems that Visual Studio designer doesn't support such generics until Visual Studio 2012 Update 2 (see http://stackoverflow.com/a/15110115/355438)

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