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I've thousands of png files which I like to make smaller with pngcrush. I've a simple find .. -exec job, but it's sequential. My machine has quite some resources and I'd make this in parallel.

The operation to be performed on every png is:

pngcrush input output && mv output input

Ideally I can specify the maximum number of parallel operations.

Is there a way to do this with bash and/or other shell helpers? I'm Ubuntu or Debian.

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2 Answers

up vote 28 down vote accepted

You can use xargs to run multiple processes in parallel:

find /path -print0 | xargs -0 -n 1 -P <nr_procs> sh -c 'pngcrush $1 temp.$$ && mv temp.$$ $1' sh

xargs will read the list of files produced by find (separated by 0 characters (-0)) and run the provided command (sh -c '...' sh) with one parameter at a time (-n 1). xargs will run <nr_procs> (-P <nr_procs>) in parallel.

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$1 does not get populated, I also tried it with a minimal example without luck. xargs is 4.4.0, any idea? –  mark Sep 28 '10 at 13:15
    
I forgot to specify the value for $0. Should be fixed now. –  Bart Sas Sep 28 '10 at 13:37
    
confirmed, works! Could you please edit your answer too? –  mark Sep 28 '10 at 13:44
    
@BartSas What does the last 'sh' mean in sh -c '...' sh? Thanks! –  dagang Aug 29 '12 at 3:17
    
@Todd It is the value of $0. You can pass any value you want. –  Bart Sas Aug 30 '12 at 11:54
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You can use custom find/xargs solutions (see Bart Sas' answer), but when things become more complex you have -at least- two powerful options:

  1. parallel from package moreutils.
  2. GNU parallel (recommended by its flexibility).
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Deb and RPM packages: build.opensuse.org/package/… –  Ryan Thompson Mar 26 '12 at 22:06
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I highly recomment GNU parallel over the moreutils version. It is much more flexible. –  Ryan Thompson Mar 26 '12 at 22:07
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