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I am running Python 2.6.5 on Mac OS X 10.6.4 (this is not the native version, I installed it myself) with Scipy 0.8.0. If I do the following:

>>> from scipy.stats import hypergeom
>>> hypergeom.sf(5,10,2,5)

I get an IndexError. Then I do:

>>> hypergeom.sf(2,10,2,2)
-4.44....

I suspect the negative value is due to bad floating point precision. Then I do the first one again:

>>> hypergeom.sf(5,10,2,5)
0.0

Now it works! Can someone explain this? Are you seeing this behavior too?

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2  
It does the same on Python 2.6.6 on Debian. –  eumiro Sep 28 '10 at 12:59
2  
For whatever it's worth, this sounds like it might be a bug, and therefore might be better asked on the scipy-users list: mail.scipy.org/mailman/listinfo/scipy-user It's more likely to get the attention of the devs there... –  Joe Kington Sep 28 '10 at 14:07
5  
I opened a ticket for this: projects.scipy.org/scipy/ticket/1291 . As Joe Kington mentioned, it would be useful to report bugs or unexpected behavior to the mailing list or bug tracker of a package. –  user333700 Sep 30 '10 at 2:39
    
(I didn't manage to add to the previous comment.) There is also another ticket about precision loss in sf of discrete distributions projects.scipy.org/scipy/ticket/1218 that might address the hypergeom.sf(2,10,2,5) is -4.4408920985006262e-016 issue –  user333700 Sep 30 '10 at 2:51
    
@user333700: Thanks for doing this! I wanted to, but had other things on my mind. –  Björn Pollex Sep 30 '10 at 9:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The problem seems to arise based if the first call to the survival function is in the range that should obviously be zero (see my comment to the previous answer). E.g., for calls to hypergeom.sf(x,M,n,N) it fails if the first call to a hypergeometric function to the function is a situation where x > n, where the survival function will always be zero.

You could trivially fix this temporarily by:

def new_hypergeom_sf(k, *args, **kwds):
    from scipy.stats import hypergeom
    (M, n, N) = args[0:3]
    try:
        return hypergeom.sf(k, *args, **kwds)
    except Exception as inst:
        if k >= n and type(inst) == IndexError:
            return 0 ## or conversely 1 - hypergeom.cdf(k, *args, **kwds)
        else:
            raise inst

Now if you have no problem editing the /usr/share/pyshared/scipy/stats/distributions.py (or equivalent file), the fix is likely on line 3966 where right now it reads:

    place(output,cond,self._sf(*goodargs))
    if output.ndim == 0:
        return output[()]
    return output

But if you change it to:

    if output.ndim == 0:
        return output[()]
    place(output,cond,self._sf(*goodargs))
    if output.ndim == 0:
        return output[()]
    return output

It now works without the IndexError. Basically if the output is zero dimensional because it fails the checks, it tries to call place, fails, and doesn't generate the distribution. (This doesn't happen if a previous distribution has already been created which is likely why this wasn't caught on earlier tests.) Note that place (defined in numpy's function_base.py) will change elements of the array (though I'm not sure if it changes the dimensionality) so it may be best to still have it leave the 0 dim check after place too. I haven't fully tested this to see if this change breaks anything else (and it applies to all discrete random variable distributions), so it maybe its best to do the first fix.

It does break it; e.g., stats.hypergeom.sf(1,10,2,5) returns as zero (instead of 2/9).

This fix seems to work much better, in the same section:

class rv_discrete(rv_generic):
...
    def sf(self, k, *args, **kwds):
    ...
        if any(cond):
            place(output,cond,self._sf(*goodargs))
        if output.ndim == 0:
            return output[()]
        return output
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I don't know python, but the function is defined like this: hypergeom.sf(x,M,n,N,loc=0)

M is the number of interesting objects, N the total number of objects, and n is how often you "pick one" (Sorry, German statistician).

If you had a bowl with 20 balls, 7 of those yellow (an interesting yellow), then N is 20 and M is 7.

Perhaps the function behaves undefined for the (nonsense) case when M>N ?

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The function as defined in python is well defined for the values of M,n,N used. From the docstring in python for scipy.stats.hypergeom, M is the total number of objects, n is number of type 1 objects, and N are drawn without replacement. So probs are hypergeom(x=0,10,2,5)=2/9, hypergeom(x=1,10,2,5)=5/9, hypergeom(x=2,10,2,5)=2/9; so the survival function for x<0 is 0, its 7/9 for 0 <= x < 1, 2/9 for 1 <= x < 2, and 0 for 2 <= x. For the sf (survival function, read as 1-cdf, cumulative distribution function) of the hypergeometric distribution, we know the answer should be 0. –  dr jimbob Oct 22 '10 at 13:48

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