Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How to get tag in html page, if I know what text tag contains. E.g.:

<a ...>SearchingText</a>
share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You'll have to traverse by hand.

var aTags = document.getElementsByTagName("a");
var searchText = "SearchingText";
var found;

for (var i = 0; i < aTags.length; i++) {
  if (aTags[i].textContent == searchText) {
    found = aTags[i];
    break;
  }
}

// Use `found`.
share|improve this answer
    
@AutoSponge Actually innerHTML is standard. innerText does not work in FF –  AnaMaria Aug 8 '13 at 9:04
    
Updated the example, textContent is likely what you want in this case. Thanks, folks :) –  August Lilleaas Aug 8 '13 at 11:02
    
@AugustLilleaas, what is up with the i < il? What is that doing? –  David Sawyer Feb 17 '14 at 0:02
    
@DavidSawyer a typo :) Updated the code. –  August Lilleaas Feb 17 '14 at 14:37

While it's possible to get by the inner text, I think you are heading the wrong way. Is that inner string dynamically generated? If so, you can give the tag a class or -- better yet -- ID when the text goes in there. If it's static, then it's even easier.

share|improve this answer

I think you'll need to be a bit more specific for us to help you.

  1. How are you finding this? Javascript? PHP? Perl?
  2. Can you apply an ID attribute to the tag?

If the text is unique (or really, if it's not, but you'd have to run through an array) you could run a regular expression to find it. Using PHP's preg_match() would work for that.

If you're using Javascript and can insert an ID attribute, then you can use getElementById('id'). You can then access the returned element's attributes through the DOM: https://developer.mozilla.org/en/DOM/element.1.

share|improve this answer

While it's been quite some time, and you've already (long-since) accepted an answer, I thought I'd offer an updated approach:

function findByTextContent(needle, haystack, precise) {
  // needle: String, the string to be found within the elements.
  // haystack: String, a selector to be passed to document.querySelectorAll(),
  //           NodeList, Array - to be iterated over within the function:
  // precise: Boolean, true - searches for that precise string, surrounded by
  //                          word-breaks,
  //                   false - searches for the string occurring anywhere
  var elems;

  // no haystack we quit here, to avoid having to search
  // the entire document:
  if (!haystack) {
    return false;
  }
  // if haystack is a string, we pass it to document.querySelectorAll(),
  // and turn the results into an Array:
  else if ('string' == typeof haystack) {
    elems = [].slice.call(document.querySelectorAll(haystack), 0);
  }
  // if haystack has a length property, we convert it to an Array
  // (if it's already an array, this is pointless, but not harmful):
  else if (haystack.length) {
    elems = [].slice.call(haystack, 0);
  }

  // work out whether we're looking at innerText (IE), or textContent 
  // (in most other browsers)
  var textProp = 'textContent' in document ? 'textContent' : 'innerText',
    // creating a regex depending on whether we want a precise match, or not:
    reg = precise === true ? new RegExp('\\b' + needle + '\\b') : new RegExp(needle),
    // iterating over the elems array:
    found = elems.filter(function(el) {
      // returning the elements in which the text is, or includes,
      // the needle to be found:
      return reg.test(el[textProp]);
    });
  return found.length ? found : false;;
}


findByTextContent('link', document.querySelectorAll('li'), false).forEach(function(elem) {
  elem.style.fontSize = '2em';
});

findByTextContent('link3', 'a').forEach(function(elem) {
  elem.style.color = '#f90';
});
<ul>
  <li><a href="#">link1</a>
  </li>
  <li><a href="#">link2</a>
  </li>
  <li><a href="#">link3</a>
  </li>
  <li><a href="#">link4</a>
  </li>
  <li><a href="#">link5</a>
  </li>
</ul>

Of course, a somewhat simpler way still is:

var textProp = 'textContent' in document ? 'textContent' : 'innerText';

// directly converting the found 'a' elements into an Array,
// then iterating over that array with Array.prototype.forEach():
[].slice.call(document.querySelectorAll('a'), 0).forEach(function(aEl) {
  // if the text of the aEl Node contains the text 'link1':
  if (aEl[textProp].indexOf('link1') > -1) {
    // we update its style:
    aEl.style.fontSize = '2em';
    aEl.style.color = '#f90';
  }
});
<ul>
  <li><a href="#">link1</a>
  </li>
  <li><a href="#">link2</a>
  </li>
  <li><a href="#">link3</a>
  </li>
  <li><a href="#">link4</a>
  </li>
  <li><a href="#">link5</a>
  </li>
</ul>

References:

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! It works like a charm! :) –  Joana Jan 28 at 15:24

You could use xpath to accomplish this

var xpath = "a[text()='SearchingText']";
var matchingElement = document.evaluate(xpath, document, null, XPathResult.FIRST_ORDERED_NODE_TYPE, null).singleNodeValue;

You can also search of an element containing some text using this xpath:

var xpath = "a[contains(text(),'Searching')]";
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.