Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

For instance I have code like that

class Base1
{
  virtual void wonderFULL() = 0;
};

class Base2
{
  // all this weird members
};

class Derived : public Base1, public Base2
{
  // not so weird members
};

int main()
{
  Derived Wonder;
  magicFunction(&Wonder);
  return 0;
}

void magicFunction(Base2 *ptr)
{
  if (Base1 *b1 = dynamic_cast<Base1 *>(ptr))
    b1->wonderFULL();
}

However wonderFULL is never executed due to impossibility to cast ptr to b1. Is it possible at all to perform such a conversion?

share|improve this question
1  
-1 for posting code that has a problem preventing the code from compiling in an area that's very closely related to the problem. –  sbi Sep 28 '10 at 14:09
1  
I agree with sbi. This sample should look like ideone.com/dg0gc . magicFunction should go before main, wonderFULL should be defined and public. –  Bill Sep 28 '10 at 14:14

7 Answers 7

This

#include <iostream>

class Base1 {
public:
    virtual void wonderFULL() = 0;
};

class Base2 {
public:
    virtual ~Base2() {}                                       // added so the code compiles
};

class Derived : public Base1, public Base2 {
    virtual void wonderFULL() {std::cout << "wonderful\n";}   // added so the code compiles
};

void magicFunction(Base2 *ptr) {
    if (Base1 *b1 = dynamic_cast<Base1 *>(ptr))
        b1->wonderFULL();
}

int main() {
    Derived Wonder;
    magicFunction(&Wonder);
    return 0;
}

prints wonderful for me. My conclusion is that you're not showing the code necessary for your problem to reproduce.

Take (a copy of) your actual code and by removing uneccessary code step by step distill it until you derive at a self-contained (needs no other headers except from the std lib), compilable example that reproduces the problem. Very likely you will find the problem while doing so. However, if you don't, you have the perfect repro case to come back here and ask about.

share|improve this answer
    
This code isn't what the OP posted. (Note how you have a virtual function in Base2 which allows the dynamic_cast.) –  Bill Sep 28 '10 at 14:05
    
@Bill: Yes, of course. Otherwise the compiler won't even compile the code. See my note at the end of my answer. –  sbi Sep 28 '10 at 14:07
    
+1, one can't cast to a pointer to class A if class A has no virtual member functions. –  sharptooth Sep 28 '10 at 14:10
    
@sbi: I assumed that the real problem was that the OP didn't have a virtual function in one of the base classes. Hard to tell for sure though. :) –  Bill Sep 28 '10 at 14:16
    
@Bill: Yeah, it might be that there's a compiler out there that doesn't issue a diagnostic for that. It's hard to imagine, though. –  sbi Sep 28 '10 at 18:09

You have some syntax errors, but your real problem is dynamic_cast won't work properly if your base classes don't have at least one virtual function.

If you make it look like:

class Base2
{
public:
  virtual ~Base2() {}
  // all this weird members
};

And then fix your other errors: wonderFULL is private, and never defined. magicFunction is declared after it is used.

Then everything works.

share|improve this answer

You can cast up the hierarchy then back down:

void magicFunction(Base2& ptr)
{
    try
    {
        Derived&  d = dynamic_cast<Derived&>(ptr);
        Base1&    b = dynamic_cast<Base1&>(d);
        b.wonderFULL();
    }
    catch(const std::bad_cast&)
    { /* Cast failed */ }
}
share|improve this answer
    
That shouldn't be necessary with dynamic_cast. See my answer. –  sbi Sep 28 '10 at 14:05
1  
It documents intent. If the compiler optimizes it away fine. But the extra human readable documentation of entente is good for me. –  Loki Astari Sep 28 '10 at 14:09
    
(You should properly @address...) Whether documenting the intent this way is necessary is open to debate. The original qwuestion ("Is it possible to dynamic_cast from one base class to another?") should have a clear and simple answer. –  sbi Sep 28 '10 at 14:10
    
@sbi I'd give my right arm for documenting intent when dealing with any casting calls other than static_cast. There's people that write code for others and then there's a whole world of people who don't. –  wheaties Sep 28 '10 at 14:13
    
@wheaties: Everyone loves good documentation, but what is good documentation isn't universally agreed upon. What you say isn't an objective criterion: Some newbie might want to write i = i + 1 to document their intention, and consider ++i to concise. In the same vein I can very well imagine myself looking at this roundabout way to do a cast across a MI hierarchy and wondering why on earth it is done that way and what I am missing. But I didn't want to take sides in this discussion. Readability is, to some extent, subjective. The answer to the question asked isn't: it's "Yes, it is." –  sbi Sep 28 '10 at 18:16

Going by what I understand of the way some C++ compilers arrange the class hierarchy in memory it should be possible to cast from one base class to another, but you have to first cast to the derived class.

Therefore you would need to do something like:

Base1* b1 = dynamic_cast<Derived*>(ptr);

This casts the given pointer ptr to the derived class, and then it gets implicitly cast to its other base class pointer.

However another easier way to do this would be to just have a method in the Base2 class that returns a Base1 pointer, and the derived class can implement this itself without any tricky code. (The same function in Base2 can just return NULL if you don't want a pure virtual class).

share|improve this answer

I've found the problem. It was not about dynamic_casts. I was checking wrong object which was not inherited from abstract base. Thanks.

share|improve this answer

In practice, it works fine if you are using GCC (or MinGW) compiler on Linux/Win32 platform or MSVC. But avoid this on Mac -- dynamic_cast will return 0-pointer.

share|improve this answer

I'm not really big in C++, but reinterpret_cast pretty much casts anything to anything, right?

Besides, in your case you could implement your magicFunction as

void magicFunction(Base2 *ptr) { 
    if (Derived *d = dynamic_cast<Base1 *>(ptr)) 
        d->wonderFULL(); 
}

Does this help?

share|improve this answer
2  
Which is one reason why it shouldn't be used...the other being that it doesn't work for casting across MI hierachies... -1 –  sbi Sep 28 '10 at 14:01

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.