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I'm building a website that contains users with user profiles. Many of the fields in the profile are optional.

There is an opportunity for a lot of user-generated content, and so I need to display the author of this content in many different locations of the site (comments, posts, etc.). In the user's profile, he is able to (optionally) fill out his "first name", his "last name", and a "display name".

To display the author, I wrote a helper method that looks through a provided array of these fields and returns the most appropriate name for the user, in this order of preference:

  1. If the user filled out display_name, this will be displayed.
  2. If the user filled out first_name and last_name, but no display_name, it will display both names
  3. If the user only filled out first_name, it will display first_name.
  4. If the user only filled out last_name, it will display last_name.
  5. If all else fails, a user id will be displayed i.e. user123
  6. If none of the array keys are present, or the parameter is NULL, the name will display as NULL

The method works great, but it's ugly. There must be a way to beautify this with an alternative to nested if/else statements.

public function nameify($names = NULL) {
    $name = '';
    if (!empty($names)) {
        if (!empty($names['display_name'])) {
            $name = $names['display_name'];
        } elseif (!empty($names['first_name'])) {
            $name = $names['first_name'];
            if (!empty($names['last_name'])) {
                $name .= ' ' . $names['last_name'];
            }
        } elseif (!empty($names['last_name'])) {
            $name = $names['last_name'];
        }

        if (empty($name) && !empty($names['id'])) {
            $name = 'user' . $names['id'];
        } else {
            $name = 'NULL';
        }
    } else {
        $name = 'NULL';
    }
    return $name;
}
share|improve this question
3  
You just misuse return operator. It can be called not only at the end of the function but anywhere. And it will terminate further execution. Just like goto does. See x3ro's answer for the example –  Your Common Sense Sep 28 '10 at 16:00

9 Answers 9

up vote 6 down vote accepted
public function nameify($names = NULL) {
    if ($names) {
        if (!empty($names['display_name'])) {
            return $names['display_name'];
        }
        if (!empty($names['first_name'])) {
            $name = $names['first_name'];
        } 
        if (!empty($names['last_name'])) {
            $name .= ' ' . $names['last_name'];
        }
        if (empty($name) && !empty($names['id'])) {
            $name = 'user' . $names['id'];
        }
    }
    return $name ? ltrim($name) : 'NULL';
}

Set the default first, and return that if nothing else matches. Then since we always want to return the display name if we have it do just that.

EDIT: Tweak to prevent returning "NULL "

share|improve this answer
    
This looks very readable. I like it. –  Stephen Sep 28 '10 at 16:04
    
Don't test for positive results and then go on inside the if statement, but test for "errors", and return if they appear. That way you reduce complexity and indentation. –  x3ro Sep 28 '10 at 16:06
    
@x3ro in your own answer you started by adhering to your advice, but the second conditional does exactly what you say not to do. –  Stephen Sep 28 '10 at 16:09
    
Maybe I was a bit unclear in my comment, I apologize. I didn't mean to say that you shouldn't ever do that, but to avoid it, if possible. In my third statement I did it the opposite way, because I would've need more conditions in the if statement otherwise. –  x3ro Sep 28 '10 at 16:14
1  
With this solution, though very readable, if the user only enters a last name, the author is displayed as "NULL last_name" –  Stephen Sep 28 '10 at 16:21

Using ternary conditions we can shorten and beautify the code:

public function nameify($names = NULL) {
    $name = 'NULL';

    if (!empty($names)) {

        $name = ($names['display_name']) ? $names['display_name'] : trim($names['first_name']." ".$names['last_name']);

        if(!$name) $name = ($names['id'] > 0) ? 'user'.$names['id'] : 'NULL';
    }

    return $name;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I don't believe so. I have warnings on and I don't get anything. It will just see it as a null value –  Brendan Bullen Sep 28 '10 at 16:09
    
Oops. I meant a notice. here's from the php documentation Attempting to access an array key which has not been defined is the same as accessing any other undefined variable: an E_NOTICE-level error message will be issued, and the result will be NULL. –  Stephen Sep 28 '10 at 16:12
    
Ah, yes. I have my error level set to ignore notices. Seeing as the expected result is a NULL, the notice is simply informational and won't cause any problems (unless you have notices turned on which you wouldn't normally in a production environment) –  Brendan Bullen Sep 28 '10 at 16:14
    
Thanks for the great answer. –  Stephen Sep 28 '10 at 17:34

I would propose this:

public function nameify($names = null) {
    if(empty($names))
        return null;

    if(!empty($names['display_name']))
        return $names['display_name'];

    if(!empty($names['first_name'])) {
        $name = $names['first_name'];
        if (!empty($names['last_name'])) {
            $name .= ' ' . $names['last_name'];
        }
        return $name;
    }

    if(!empty($names['id]))
        return 'user' . $names['id'];

    return null;
}
share|improve this answer

It is not much, but because $name it is at least NULL:

public function nameify($names = NULL) {
    $name = 'NULL';
    if (!empty($names)) {
        if (!empty($names['display_name'])) {
            $name = $names['display_name'];
        } elseif (!empty($names['first_name'])) {
            $name = $names['first_name'];
            if (!empty($names['last_name'])) {
                $name .= ' ' . $names['last_name'];
            }
        } elseif (!empty($names['last_name'])) {
            $name = $names['last_name'];
        }

        if ($name=='NULL' && !empty($names['id'])) {
            $name = 'user' . $names['id'];
        } 
    } 
    return $name;
}
share|improve this answer
//pointers to functions
$arrayOfSulutions{"display_name_strategy", "full_name_strategy" ..., "null_strategy" } 
function display_name_strategy{
     return $names['display_name'];
}
$i = 0;
while($res == null){
     $res = call($arrayOfSulutions[$i++]);
}
share|improve this answer
    
@Stephen: These is solution from Java world) –  Stas Kurilin Sep 28 '10 at 16:01
    
-1 Because of two things: Maximum complexity (== maximum debugging time) and minimum performance (call_user_func is extremely slow in PHP) –  x3ro Sep 28 '10 at 16:04
    
@x3ro : minimum performance - yes. complexity - no. Flexibility- yes! –  Stas Kurilin Sep 28 '10 at 16:08
    
@Stas: Imho, this is way more complex than an if/else solution. Anything you have to think about more than 5 seconds to understand the basic logic is complex for such a task. Also, the author didn't mention any needs of flexibility. –  x3ro Sep 28 '10 at 16:12
1  
I don't agree. The first think you should think about when writing your code is maintainability and readability! When you write a flexible solution only you can mantain, that won't help anyone at all. –  x3ro Sep 28 '10 at 16:26

Somewhat less readable, but effective):

list($idx,$name) = array_shift(array_filter(array(
    $names['display_name'],
    implode(' ',array_filter(array($names['first_name'],$names['last_name']))),
    'user'.$names['id'];
    )));
share|improve this answer
    
-1 "Somewhat less readable" ... Seriously, who is going to debug something like that... This is why I hate PHP... –  x3ro Sep 28 '10 at 16:08
    
Please don't misunderstand my comment though, its an neat idea, its just nothing anyone should ever use in production unless there is any other way to do it ;) –  x3ro Sep 28 '10 at 16:15
    
Bah, I love it. It could be made more readable but this is a beautiful example of some of the hidden parts of php. –  Chuck Vose Sep 28 '10 at 16:29
1  
@x3ro : I agree this is something I'd never use in production, just had to throw an if-less solution out there after the multitude of all not-quite-that-much-better answers. For educational purposes only, and I'd hate it if a coworker tried to use similar constructs in production :) –  Wrikken Sep 28 '10 at 16:46

A State machine works very nicely for involved logic like that. It's very simple to implement as well (using a switch statement).

share|improve this answer
    
Do you have an example of how to implement this abstraction for my problem? Even if it's in pseudo code I'd like to see it. –  Stephen Sep 28 '10 at 16:07
    
Seconded, I'd love to see the code for this. –  Chuck Vose Sep 28 '10 at 16:28
    
Although I've accepted Chuck Vose's answer, I'm still interested in this one. –  Stephen Sep 28 '10 at 17:35
    
static enum { sleep, work, SurfStackOverflow, StareOutWindow, Game } state = sleep ; ClockChimeEvent() { switch (state) { case sleep: if ( hour == 9 ) { state = SurfStackOverflow; } break; case SurfStackOverflow: if ( hour == 10 ) { EatBreakfast(); state = work; } break; case work: if ( hour == 12 ) { EatLunch(); state = StareOutWindow ; } break; case StareOutWindow : if ( hour == 17 ) { EatDinner(); state = Game ; } break; case Game : if ( hour == 23 ) { EatSnack(); state = sleep ; } break; } } –  Jay Sep 29 '10 at 17:08
    
Sorry for the lack of formatting... –  Jay Sep 29 '10 at 17:08

I'm not sure that my version would be simplier, but here it is:

public function nameify($names = null) {
    $result = array();

    if( !empty($names['display_name']) ) {
        array_push($result,$names['display_name']);
    } else {
        if( !empty($names['first_name']) ) {
            array_push($result, $names['first_name']);
        }
        if( !empty($names['last_name']) ) {
            array_push($result, $names['last_name']);
        }
    }

    if( empty($result) && !empty($names['id']) ) {
        array_push($result, 'user'.$names['id']);
    }

    return (empty($result) ? 'NULL' : implode(' ', $result));
}
share|improve this answer

I'd go with:

if( empty($names['display_name']) ) {
    $name = $names['first_name'] . ' ' $names['last_name'];
else
    $name = $names['display_name'];

$name = trim($name);
if( empty($name) ) 
    $name = 'user'.$names['id'];
if( empty($name) ) 
    $name = 'NULL';

This would be the 'core logic'... there will need to be other checks like $names != NULL or something..

share|improve this answer
    
nice.............. –  Stewie Sep 28 '10 at 15:54
1  
I think you mean empty and not !empty on line one. –  Stephen Sep 28 '10 at 15:56
    
@Stephen right you are. Will edit. Please feel free to edit others' answers. –  jrharshath Sep 28 '10 at 18:39
    
Would if I could. You need 2000 rep to do that. –  Stephen Sep 28 '10 at 18:43
    
aah.. didn't notice. –  jrharshath Sep 28 '10 at 18:46

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