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I have linear systems of inequalities in 3 variables and I'd like to plot these regions. Ideally, I'd like something that looks like objects in PolyhedronData. I tried RegionPlot3D, but the results are visually poor and too polygon-heavy to rotate in real time

Here's what I mean, the code below generates 10 sets of linear constraints and plots them

randomCons := Module[{},
   hadamard = KroneckerProduct @@ Table[{{1, 1}, {1, -1}}, {3}];
   invHad = Inverse[hadamard];
   vs = Range[8];
   m = mm /@ vs;
   sectionAnchors = Subsets[vs, {1, 7}];
   randomSection := 
    Mean[hadamard[[#]] & /@ #] & /@ 
     Prepend[RandomChoice[sectionAnchors, 3], vs]; {p0, p1, p2, p3} = 
    randomSection;
   section = 
    Thread[m -> 
      p0 + {x, y, z}.Orthogonalize[{p1 - p0, p2 - p0, p3 - p0}]];
   And @@ Thread[invHad.m >= 0 /. section]
   ];
Table[RegionPlot3D @@ {randomCons, {x, -3, 3}, {y, -3, 3}, {z, -3, 
    3}}, {10}]

Any suggestions?

Update: Incorporating suggestions below, here's the version I ended up using to plot feasible region of a system of linear inequalities

(* Plots feasible region of a linear program in 3 variables, \
specified as cons[[1]]>=0,cons[[2]]>=0,...
Each element of cons must \
be an expression of variables x,y,z only *)

plotFeasible3D[cons_] := 
 Module[{maxVerts = 20, vcons, vertCons, polyCons},
  (* find intersections of all triples of planes and get rid of \
intersections that aren't points *)

  vcons = Thread[# == 0] & /@ Subsets[cons, {3}];
  vcons = Select[vcons, Length[Reduce[#]] == 3 &];
  (* Combine vertex constraints with inequality constraints and find \
up to maxVerts feasible points *)
  vertCons = Or @@ (And @@@ vcons);
  polyCons = And @@ Thread[cons >= 0];
  verts = {x, y, z} /. 
    FindInstance[polyCons && vertCons, {x, y, z}, maxVerts];
  ComputationalGeometry`Methods`ConvexHull3D[verts, 
   Graphics`Mesh`FlatFaces -> False]
  ]

Code for testing

randomCons := Module[{},
   hadamard = KroneckerProduct @@ Table[{{1, 1}, {1, -1}}, {3}];
   invHad = Inverse[hadamard];
   vs = Range[8];
   m = mm /@ vs;
   sectionAnchors = Subsets[vs, {1, 7}];
   randomSection := 
    Mean[hadamard[[#]] & /@ #] & /@ 
     Prepend[RandomChoice[sectionAnchors, 3], vs]; {p0, p1, p2, p3} = 
    randomSection;
   section = 
    Thread[m -> 
      p0 + {x, y, z}.Orthogonalize[{p1 - p0, p2 - p0, p3 - p0}]];
   And @@ Thread[invHad.m >= 0 /. section]
   ];
Table[plotFeasible3D[List @@ randomCons[[All, 1]]], {50}];
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here is a small program that seems to do what you want:

rstatic = randomCons;                    (* Call your function *)
randeq = rstatic /. x_ >= y_ -> x == y;  (* make a set of plane equations 
                                            replacing the inequalities by == *)

eqset = Subsets[randeq, {3}];            (* Make all possible subsets of 3 planes *)

                                         (* Now find the vertex candidates
                                            Solving the sets of three equations *)
vertexcandidates =      
    Flatten[Table[Solve[eqset[[i]]], {i, Length[eqset]}], 1];

                                         (* Now select those candidates 
                                            satisfying all the original equations *)          
vertex = Union[Select[vertexcandidates, rstatic /. # &]];

                                         (* Now use an UNDOCUMENTED Mathematica
                                            function to plot the surface *)

gr1 = ComputationalGeometry`Methods`ConvexHull3D[{x, y, z} /. vertex];
                                         (* Your plot follows *)
gr2 = RegionPlot3D[rstatic,
        {x, -3, 3}, {y, -3, 3}, {z, -3, 3},
         PerformanceGoal -> "Quality", PlotPoints -> 50]

Show[gr1,gr2]   (*Show both Graphs superposed *)

The result is:

alt text

Downside: the undocumented function is not perfect. When the face is not a triangle, it will show a triangulation:

alt text

Edit

There is an option to get rid of the foul triangulation

 ComputationalGeometry`Methods`ConvexHull3D[{x, y, z} /. vertex,
                                Graphics`Mesh`FlatFaces -> False]

does the magic. Sample:

alt text

Edit 2

As I mentioned in a comment, here are two sets of degenerate vertex generated by your randomCons

 {{x -> Sqrt[3/5]}, 
  {x -> -Sqrt[(5/3)] + Sqrt[2/3] y}, 
  {x -> -Sqrt[(5/3)], y -> 0}, 
  {y -> -Sqrt[(2/5)], x -> Sqrt[3/5]}, 
  {y -> 4 Sqrt[2/5],  x -> Sqrt[3/5]}
 }

and

{{x -> -Sqrt[(5/3)] + (2 z)/Sqrt[11]}, 
 {x -> Sqrt[3/5], z -> 0}, 
 {x -> -Sqrt[(5/3)], z -> 0}, 
 {x -> -(13/Sqrt[15]), z -> -4 Sqrt[11/15]}, 
 {x -> -(1/Sqrt[15]),  z -> 2 Sqrt[11/15]}, 
 {x -> 17/(3 Sqrt[15]), z -> -((4 Sqrt[11/15])/3)}
}

Still trying to see how to cope gently with those ...

Edit 3

This code is not general enough for the full problem, but eliminates the cylinder degenerancy problem for your sample data generator. I used the fact that the pathogenic cases are always cylinders with their axis paralell to one of the coordinate axis, and then used RegionPlot3D to plot them. I'm not sure if this will be useful for your general case :(.

For[i = 1, i <= 160, i++,
 rstatic = randomCons;
 r[i] = rstatic;
 s1 = Reduce[r[i], {x, y, z}] /. {x -> var1, y -> var2, z -> var3};
 s2 = Union[StringCases[ToString[FullForm[s1]], "var" ~~ DigitCharacter]];

 If [Dimensions@s2 == {3},

  (randeq = rstatic /. x_ >= y_ -> x == y;
   eqset = Subsets[randeq, {3}];
   vertexcandidates = Flatten[Table[Solve[eqset[[i]]], {i, Length[eqset]}], 1];
   vertex = Union[Select[vertexcandidates, rstatic /. # &]];
   a[i] = ComputationalGeometry`Methods`ConvexHull3D[{x, y, z} /. vertex, 
            Graphics`Mesh`FlatFaces -> False, Axes -> False, PlotLabel -> i])
  ,

   a[i] = RegionPlot3D[s1, {var1, -2, 2}, {var2, -2, 2}, {var3, -2, 2},
             Axes -> False, PerformanceGoal -> "Quality", PlotPoints -> 50, 
             PlotLabel -> i, PlotStyle -> Directive[Yellow, Opacity[0.5]], 
             Mesh -> None]
  ];
 ]

GraphicsGrid[Table[{a[i], a[i + 1], a[i + 2]}, {i, 1, 160, 4}]]

Here you can find an image of the generated output, the degenerated cases (all cylinders) are in transparent yellow

HTH!

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, looks really nice! I think I have an idea how to get rid of extra lines on faces, will update my post in a bit –  Yaroslav Bulatov Oct 6 '10 at 3:46
    
@Yaroslav found it . There is an option there. See edit –  belisarius Oct 6 '10 at 4:39
    
@Yaroslav Are the degenerate solutions an issue for you? Your eq. system sometimes generates infinite cylinders (I didn't check if also planes and isolated points) –  belisarius Oct 6 '10 at 6:26
    
@Yaroslav ConvexHull3D fails with those. I already experienced that. There is an easy way to detect cylinders using FindInstance to find solutions to randomCons with at least a coordinate with a value greater than your expected boundaries. –  belisarius Oct 6 '10 at 6:41
    
and that detects planes too ... but not isolated points. But, as the points should be coplanar, you may check coplanarity. –  belisarius Oct 6 '10 at 6:42
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Seeing all the previous answers; what is wrong with using the build-in function RegionPlot3D, e.g.

RegionPlot3D[  2*y+3*z <= 5 &&  x+y+2*z <= 4 && x+2*y+3*z <= 7 &&
               x >= 0 && y >= 0 && z >= 0,
             {x, 0, 4}, {y, 0, 5/2}, {z, 0, 5/3} ]
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, I made it confusing by replacing my original question with the final solution. If you go into edit history and look at the original question you'll see that the issue is that RegionPlot3D gives poor quality plots for the kinds of systems I needed –  Yaroslav Bulatov May 3 '11 at 23:01
    
@Yaroslav: I would suggest that you copy and paste your solution out of the question and into a new answer, and then revert your question to some earlier version. That would be less confusing, don't you think? –  SamB May 4 '11 at 20:47
    
Fixed. I think it works better to append summarized/condensed version of the accepted answer to the question itself rather than add it as a separate answer –  Yaroslav Bulatov May 5 '11 at 21:13
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A triplet chosen from your set of inequalities will generally determine a point obtained by solving the corresponding triplet of equations. I believe that you want the convex hull of this set of points. You can generate this like so.

cons = randomCons;  (* Your function *)
eqs = Apply[Equal, List @@@ Subsets[cons, {3}], {2}];
sols = Flatten[{x, y, z} /. Table[Solve[eq, {x, y, z}], {eq, eqs}], 1];
pts = Select[sols, And @@ (NumericQ /@ #) &];
ComputationalGeometry`Methods`ConvexHull3D[pts]

Of course, some triplets might actually be underdetermined and lead to lines or evan a whole plane. Thus the code will issue a complaint in those cases.

This appeared to work in the few random cases that I tried but, as Yaro points out, it doesn't work in all. The following picture will illustrate exactly why:

{p0, p1, p2, 
   p3} = {{1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0}, {1, 1/2, -(1/2), 0, -(1/2), 0, 
    0, -(1/2)}, {1, 0, 1/2, 1/2, 0, 0, -(1/2), 1/2}, {1, -(1/2), 1/2, 
    0, -(1/2), 0, 0, -(1/2)}};
hadamard = KroneckerProduct @@ Table[{{1, 1}, {1, -1}}, {3}];
invHad = Inverse[hadamard];
vs = Range[8];
m = mm /@ vs;
section = 
  Thread[m -> 
    p0 + {x, y, z}.Orthogonalize[{p1 - p0, p2 - p0, p3 - p0}]];
cons = And @@ Thread[invHad.m >= 0 /. section];
eqs = Apply[Equal, List @@@ Subsets[cons, {3}], {2}];
sols = Flatten[{x, y, z} /. Table[Solve[eq, {x, y, z}], {eq, eqs}], 
    1]; // Quiet
pts = Select[sols, And @@ (NumericQ /@ #) &];
ptPic = Graphics3D[{PointSize[Large], Point[pts]}];
regionPic = 
  RegionPlot3D[cons, {x, -2, 2}, {y, -2, 2}, {z, -2, 2}, 
   PlotPoints -> 40];
Show[{regionPic, ptPic}]

Thus, there are points that are ultimately cut off by the plane defined by some other constraint. Here's one (I'm sure terribly inefficient) way to find the ones you want.

regionPts = regionPic[[1, 1]];
nf = Nearest[regionPts];
trimmedPts = Select[pts, Norm[# - nf[#][[1]]] < 0.2 &];
trimmedPtPic = Graphics3D[{PointSize[Large], Point[trimmedPts]}];
Show[{regionPic, trimmedPtPic}]

Thus, you could use the convex hull of trimmedPts. This ultimately depends on the result of RegionPlot and you might need to ramp of the value of PlotPoints to make it more reliable.

Googling about a bit reveals the concept of a feasibility region in linear programming. This seems to be exactly what you're after.

Mark

share|improve this answer
    
The output is just the kind I wanted but it doesn't seem to match the region produced by RegionPlot3D, added an example in edit –  Yaroslav Bulatov Sep 29 '10 at 3:04
    
that makes sense, thanks...this turns out to be a bit more work than I expected –  Yaroslav Bulatov Sep 29 '10 at 6:00
    
I found a suggestion to 1. Use Reduce to get a set of constraints, 2. replace all inequality constraints with equality ones and 3. use FindInstance on this set of equations. Checking FullForm[Reduce[cons]], step 2 seems hard –  Yaroslav Bulatov Sep 29 '10 at 6:29
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