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I have a menu for which I wanted all of the space around the text, within each individual item, to take the user to the specified page. I looked around on the web and found that the best solution is to set the "a" display to block, as follows:

a {
    display: block;
    height: 100%;
    text-decoration: underline;
}

I have managed to get this working perfectly but want to put images in some of them - like a calendar icon for the events option. I notice it is now underlining the links too. Is there any way to get rid of this? The links have padding-right set to 5px if that helps narrow down the cause / solution.

So all the relevant code is as follows:

a {
    display: block;
    height: 100%;
    text-decoration: underline;
}
a > img {
    text-decoration: none;
    border: none;
    padding-right: 5px;
    width: 1.8em;
    height: 1.8em;
}

Many thanks in advance.

Regards,

Richard

PS It is Google Chrome in which I am having this problem - I have not currently checked it in any other browsers.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Images are inline elements, so they are treated as part of the text. It's not the image that is underlined, it's the text that contains the image that is underlined, so it doesn't help to prevent underlining for the image.

You can turn the images into block elements by floating them, then they are not part of the text:

a > img {
    float: left;
    border: none;
    padding-right: 5px;
    width: 1.8em;
    height: 1.8em;
}
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Great thank you thank you thank you! Saves me a lot of time and effort. I tried display: block on the images (as advised on another site) but it never even occurred to me to try float. –  ClarkeyBoy Sep 28 '10 at 23:24
    
You may find that using the background-image and background-position properties is an even better solution. It depends on what the content of the images is I suppose. –  Casey Sep 28 '10 at 23:55
    
@Casey: Good point. Background images can't be resized though, which might be a limitation in this case. –  Guffa Sep 29 '10 at 0:22
    
The inability to resize was the problem I was facing somewhere else - I had an img with class="expand". I tried to set the src from css (so the src was only specified once and so a change of image would only require one change). However I found that the only ways were to set the src in each case or to use background-image - thats where I discovered that limitation. To be honest, unless I am using the same image for, say, 200 images but only want to change the image in 100 of those, I could just replace the actual image file anyway, and rename the original. –  ClarkeyBoy Oct 1 '10 at 18:22

I think your best option is to get rid of the underline text-decoration property for the a element, put the link text in a span with common class, and apply text-decoration: underline to that class.

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I was afraid that would be the kind of answer I got... :( Thanks anyway –  ClarkeyBoy Sep 28 '10 at 23:20
    
Your span doesn't need a class name, just target it with "a > span {}" –  Casey Sep 28 '10 at 23:21
    
Guffa got the right answer - using float: left on the images solves the problem!! I was about to add all the spans in too.. –  ClarkeyBoy Sep 28 '10 at 23:25
    
@Casey: I generally try to never have a span or a div that doesn't have an id or a class, since they're meaningless entities on their own. –  ngroot Sep 28 '10 at 23:39
    
@ngroot A containing element with a class name grants meaning to its children, ie: "ul.menu li a span {}" –  Casey Sep 28 '10 at 23:52

I was running in the same doubt. The text-decoration set to none works for me:

<a href="..." style="text-decoration:none;">
    <img src="...">
</a>

As was said befor, you can use a class to make this more generic.

Nice question by the way, It looks totally strange in my website when I saw some minus at the bottom of images. Then I realize that was an underlying.

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