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I have an array @number = [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9]
Now, I want to randomize the array content... something like eg: [5,3,2,6,7,1,8]
Please guide me how to proceed with it.

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Duplicate… –  Nakilon Sep 29 '10 at 4:47
Your hypotetic function dropped 2 elements from array. Even shuffle can't do that, gg! –  Nakilon Sep 29 '10 at 5:00

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Use the shuffle method ...

irb(main):001:0> [1,2,3,4,5].shuffle
=> [3, 4, 2, 5, 1]
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the shuffle command returns a randomized version of an array


[1,2,3].shuffle => [2,3,1]
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Works on 1.8.7p249 –  Dave Pirotte Sep 29 '10 at 4:45
and if you want to randomize in place, you can just write @number.shuffle! –  Peter Sep 29 '10 at 5:08
[1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9].sort_by {rand}[0,9]  
=> [5, 7, 3, 8, 9, 4, 2, 1, 6]
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good for 1.8.6 :) but now out of date! –  banister Sep 29 '10 at 14:50

If you are using old version of ruby... this will work

def randomize(array)
b = []
array.length.downto(1) { |n|
    b.push array.delete_at(rand(n))


a = [1,2,3,4,5] b=randomize(a) print b

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dude this code is a mess! –  banister Sep 29 '10 at 14:51
At least, he is the only one here, who gave a working solution without built-in functions. –  Nakilon Sep 30 '10 at 7:12
loop n times
   i = random array index
   j = random array index
   swap elements i and j
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Random is not guaranteed to give properly distributed results. Therefore, swapping elements with two random indexes might give you array with blocks of unchanged sequences in the middle. You should increment i from 0 to n and take random j to ensure all elements get swapped at least once. –  Dan Abramov Sep 29 '10 at 4:45
Awful. Even and odd n gives two different sets of permutations. It's so sad, but still some teachers teach students of this method... Never do that! –  Nakilon Sep 29 '10 at 4:54
@Nakilon: What are you talking about? Why does it matter if n is even or odd? –  RyanHennig Sep 29 '10 at 17:37
@RyanHennig. 1. If you give me original array and n, I should tell you, what half of permutations' set you can't get, and what you can. With [1,2,3,4,5] and n%2 == 1 you'll never get [5,4,3,2,1]. 2. Also, in ideal random suffled array statistically the 1 element is in its original (where it would be in oredered array) place. Your shuffling of array with 1mln elements will take at least 7mln swappings to make array with 2 element on their original places. –  Nakilon Sep 30 '10 at 6:59
@gaearon: There was no requirement to ensure that all elements get swapped at least once. –  RyanHennig Oct 15 '10 at 3:51

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