Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm working on an exercise from Accelerated C++:

Write a program to count how many times each distinct word appears in its input.

Here's my code:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <vector>

int main()
{
    // Ask for 
    // and read the input words
    std::cout << "Please input your words: " << std::endl;
    std::vector<std::string> word_input;
    std::string word;
    int count = 0;
    while (std::cin >> word)
    {
        word_input.push_back(word);
        ++count;
    }

    // Compare the input words 
    // and output the times of every word compared only with all the words

    /***** I think this loop is causing the problem ******/
    for (int i = 0; i != count; ++i)
    {
        int time = 0;
        for (int j = 0; j != count; ++j)
        {
            if (word_input[i] == word_input[j])
                ++time;
            else
                break;
        }

        std::cout << "The time of "
                    << word_input[i]
                    << " is: "
                    << time
                    << std::endl;
    }

    return 0;   
}

If you compile and run this program, you will see:

Please input your words:

And I input as follows:

good good is good
EOF

Then it shows:

The time of good is: 2
The time of good is: 2
The time of is is: 0
The time of good is: 2

My expected result is:

The time of good is: 3
The time of is is: 1

I don't want to use a map, because I haven't learned that yet.

What is causing this unexpected behavior, and how do I fix it?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Assuming that std::vector is the only container you're acquainted with at this point, and that you haven't gotten to std::pair yet, I suggest the following:

  • you add a std::vector<int> word_count
  • in your std::cin while-loop, you check if the current word is present in word_input. If it is not, you push_back the word and push_back a 1 in word_count. If there already is an entry for the current word at some index i in word_input, you increment word_count at this index i. Thus every distinct word you input only appears once in word_input, with the number of times it was input being managed in word_count.
  • for output, step through word_input and word_count in parallel and output the word count for every word.

Done.

But all this gets much simpler and more elegant with a std::map. Keep reading! :-)

share|improve this answer

Just delete the else statement.

int main()
{
    // Ask for 
    // and read the input words
    std::cout << "Please input your words: "
              << std::endl;
    std::vector<std::string> word_input;
    std::string word;
    int count = 0;
    while (std::cin >> word)
        {
            word_input.push_back(word);
            ++count;
        }

    // Compare the input words 
    // and output the times of every word compared only with all the words
    for (int i = 0; i != count; ++i)
        {
            int time = 0;
            for (int j = 0; j != count; ++j)
                {
                    if (word_input[i] == word_input[j])
                        ++time;
                    // else          <========== You don't need this!
                    //    break;
                }

            std::cout << "The time of "
                 << word_input[i]
                 << " is: "
                 << time
                 << std::endl;
        }

    return 0;   
}

Note that your solution is very slow for larger inputs. The better idea would be to use hashtable(std::map) for your 'dictionary' or to sort that vector and than count distinct words (runs in O(logN*N), your solution is O(N^2)).

share|improve this answer
    
std::map isn't implemented as a hashtable so it will still be slow. See stdext::hash_map or the newer std::tr1::unordered_map. –  Mark Ingram Sep 29 '10 at 11:21
    
I don't want to use map because I haven't learned that~ I have just learned 3 chapters. And I have justed edited my question. Maybe you didn't get what I want. Thank you all the same~ –  Darson Sep 29 '10 at 11:23
    
@Mark Ingram: Or alternatively boost::unordered_map for older compilers. –  lunaryorn Sep 29 '10 at 11:27
    
@Mark thanks. I 'll check that –  Klark Sep 29 '10 at 11:35

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.