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This is a poll asking the Stackoverflow community what non-programming books they would recommend to fellow programmers.

Please read the following before posting:

  • Please post only ONE BOOK PER ANSWER.

  • Please search for your recommendation on this page before posting (there are over NINE PAGES so it is advisable to check them all). Many books have already been suggested and we want to avoid duplicates. If you find your recommendation is already present, vote it up or add some commentary.

  • Please elaborate on why you think a given book is worth reading from a programmer's perspective.

Note: this article is similar and contains other useful suggestions.

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52  
can somebody with account on meta. put in a request for in-answers search? –  zvolkov Jul 20 '09 at 16:37
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@zvolkov: The request is already there, Jeff says it's a low priority. I upvoted the question. (meta.stackexchange.com/questions/1274/…) –  Peter Di Cecco Aug 19 '09 at 14:00
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Does anyone see the difference between this list and "What books should geeks read?" lists? –  HuBeZa Aug 20 '09 at 9:26
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zvolkov, you already have an account on meta! Meta uses the same openID protocol just as SO does. So you don't need to register an account if you already use an openID provider. –  Travis Aug 22 '09 at 1:30
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It is really lame that people closed this. –  ChaosPandion Dec 17 '09 at 21:01

316 Answers 316

The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

by Douglas Adams

alt text

Life, the universe, and everything

"See first, think later, then test. But always see first. Otherwise you will only see what you were expecting. Most scientists forget that." -- Wonko the Sane

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Voted up to make it 42 ;) –  Mark A. Nicolosi Nov 4 '08 at 1:46
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As the question says: "Please elaborate on why you think a given book is worth reading from a programmer's perspective." –  Ash Jan 31 '09 at 13:28
47  
I've read all the books in the series and really liked them but I can't think why programmers should read them. –  Annan Feb 1 '09 at 0:51
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As a developer and previously as tech support, there's one thing to learn from this book (and the entire series): DON'T PANIC!!! After that, there's also the comfort of reading about problems bigger than you own :P –  SirDemon Apr 4 '09 at 6:42
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Enjoyable, but over-rated. Most useful for understanding why your colleagues laugh at non sequiturs that involve the number 42. –  Keith Smith Jun 15 '09 at 15:15

How to Win Friends and Influence People

by Dale Carnegie

How to Win Friends and Influence People

Although this was first published in 1936, the advice contained within is still as fresh and appropriate as ever. Don't be put off by the name. This isn't some underhand guide to having your way with unsuspecting victims, but rather common sense advice on how to get on with people, how to nurture relationships and make the most of yourself and your fellow man (and woman).

It is well known that technical folk (including programmers) are often thought of as not being terribly 'people oriented' (whether this is a justified stereotype or not is subject of another discussion) and so this book is an invaluable resource for teaching you the finer points of human interaction.

It's warm, heartfelt, sturdy, straightforward and timelessly written. Highly recommended.

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Yeah, I did exactly the same thing and resisted this book for ages because of the title. It really is a much more gentle and honorable book than the title suggests, though. –  Charles Roper Oct 22 '08 at 17:46
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I wrote a blog post about this if you are at all interested: fitnessconnections.com/blog/post/2008/10/… –  Kyle B. Feb 2 '09 at 20:01
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OMG! That's Jon Skeet on the front! –  Skilldrick Feb 27 '09 at 15:37
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+1 - I've read the book twice. It has been more valuable to me than any individual technical book in my career. –  Kyle B. Apr 4 '09 at 6:24
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This book isn't bad, but there are better ones. Once you get halfway through, you start to feel like this guy is hacking relationships instead of forging them. –  bobobobo Jul 2 '09 at 1:52

Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman!

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This book will inspire anyone to think and be original.

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An absolutely amazing book. The joys of thinking and being different. He doesn't just praise it, he lives (lived) it and loved it. It's so much fun. (Plus, he was ridiculously brilliant, so it's a facinating look at some deep stuff mixed in.) –  Beska Apr 9 '09 at 20:35
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I'd vote for this one 2x if I could. Great! –  Travis Leleu Aug 19 '09 at 22:05
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Feynman's Lectures on Physics is one of the best books I've ever read on physics, and it kind of communicates what's in the book above. –  Reed Richards Nov 25 '09 at 14:32

Nineteen Eighty Four

by George Orwell

1984

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+1 - This should be required reading for anyone writing internet apps that store user data. –  TarkaDaal Feb 8 '09 at 9:23
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A classic that everyone should read at least once. –  RobH Apr 9 '09 at 18:25
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It should be required reading? Hmm, somehow I guess you missed its point. ;) –  ApplePieIsGood Apr 9 '09 at 22:13
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1984 is great reading for programmers, and so is: amazon.com/George-Orwell-1943-1945-Collected-Journalism/dp/… A particular essay (Politics and the English Language) emphasizes the importance of precision and concision in language, which a programmer will appreciate. –  Troy Nichols Apr 10 '09 at 0:21
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Orwell's ANIMAL FARM is good too. –  PTBNL Jul 1 '09 at 22:24

Another one from a different angle from prior posts: Gödel, Escher, Bach: an Eternal Golden Braid, by Douglas Hofstadter.

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Once I read it too, its informative in a number of ways, and enlightens us. Would definitely recommend it. But I took a long time to read it though. –  Socratees Sep 20 '08 at 17:18
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I'm half way through it and must say it is overrated. The author tends to repeat concepts too often it gets annoying. Some times I just want to yell at the author "RECURSION I GET IT" –  heeen Apr 9 '09 at 20:29
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I agree that this book is kind of overrated, especially if a lot of its concepts are already familiar to you. Maybe if you read it during the first year of college you would gain more from it than 6 years later. That said, the word play and dialogues are good fun. –  cbp Apr 10 '09 at 0:35
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Yeah I agree with some of the others who found it overrated. Having just completed a Computer Science and Philosophy degree I didn't find that many new ideas in it. Was interesting at times but just way too slow. –  David Terei Jul 2 '09 at 1:59
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Remember the part where he says you can't surprise someone reading a book with the ending since by its nature you can tell when you are reaching the end of the book. He then proposes that you could do it if you had the ending occur any where you wanted and then fill the next couple hundred pages with gibberish. I always wonder if he used this technique in this book and where does the gibberish actually start.... –  jmucchiello Aug 24 '09 at 20:36

The Design of Everyday Things by Donald A. Norman.

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I've been picking at this over the last month or so. Really makes you look at everything in a different (mostly angrier) light :) –  jammus Oct 16 '08 at 16:07
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Great book, makes you think appreciate good design even more. –  Danielb Mar 18 '09 at 15:50
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He talks too much about doors. –  Chad Dec 14 '09 at 14:42

Getting Things Done

by David Allen.

alt text

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I totally recommend this one. It won't change your life, but it will help you think about productivity and procrastination as just another problem to be solved, and not as just an inherent flaw that you have to live with. That mindset shift makes all the difference to a lazy dude like me :) –  Brandon Yarbrough Apr 9 '09 at 20:19
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Don't be skeptical! I was too at first, but then I read it and I was honestly stunned to find out I had doubled my productivity within days and literally had almost eliminated all stress. I finally feel in control of my life, and I know this sounds like some sales pitch, but its true. –  James Simpson Jul 23 '09 at 3:41
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+1 just applying the "do immediately what you can do in 2 minutes" will clear your life up considerably. –  pageman Aug 21 '09 at 20:51
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I keep meaning to go out and get this book. –  Kaz Dragon Dec 14 '09 at 16:09
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@Neil N ibiblio.org/purvis/GTD-flowchart.png –  John Nolan Aug 26 '10 at 22:03

The Mythical Man-Month

by Fred Brooks

The Mythical Man Month

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Very interesting book –  Kristian Sep 19 '08 at 17:09
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How is this a non-programming book? –  MusiGenesis Oct 7 '08 at 19:24
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-1 because, even thouth this is a good book, it is about programming –  Gabe Moothart Apr 9 '09 at 22:14
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@tomjen Okay, but to someone who read The Mythical Man Month before finding those blogs, you recognize one of their influences. It's a bit exteme to call it worthless just because the advice is good enough to have been repeated by some of SO's favorite bloggers. –  ojrac Jul 1 '09 at 21:29
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@tomjen I can't imagine why anyone thinks Casablanca is a good movie, everything about it is cliche. Yeah, it isn't full of new ideas now after its bones have been picked clean over the past few decades. But it is an excellent PROGRAMMING book. –  sal Aug 21 '09 at 21:03

Don't Make Me Think by Steve Krug. An essential book about web usability. As Krug says, "Common sense isn't always obvious."

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(Hint: Amazon.com has good usability)

Update: This is now part of the library at work. I've gotten about five people to read it so far. 100% positive reviews, predictably.

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Not only for web usability, developers should read this book for general usability. –  spinodal Sep 20 '08 at 16:28
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Really good one! –  Pavel Bastov May 8 '09 at 2:35
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This is hardly a non-programming book. web design is part of web development which is a programming thing. –  hasenj Nov 8 '09 at 9:09

Peopleware: Productive Projects and Teams

by Tom DeMarco and Timothy Lister

alt text

This classic book encourages us to think about the people instead of the process. It's full of practical advice on team building, productivity and office environments. It's a must read, not just for managers, but anyone related to software development.

Get two copies, one for you and one for your manager.

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It's a great book, but be warned that if you're not in a position to make changes, it may only frustrate you to see the gap between how things ought to be and how they actually are. –  Kyralessa Apr 10 '09 at 1:11
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It's a good book but it's borderline that it's non-programming... –  Jon Hopkins Jul 28 '09 at 8:24
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it's about programmers, not at all about programming! –  Serge - appTranslator Oct 1 '09 at 19:29
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@Kyralessa But if you never see that gap, then you perhaps never will be in such a position. –  Brian Ortiz Nov 1 '09 at 19:13

Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance

by Robert M. Pirsig

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This book is many things, but you could say it's sort of a philosophical take on what it means to "grok" something.


Commentry from Garth Gilmore:

I credit this book with teaching me more about software development than any programming book I ever read.

The central thread in the book is how our romantic (artistic) and classical (technical/rational) perceptions of the world are both derived from how we perceive quality in the environment around us. This understanding is then applied to apparently mundane tasks like motorcycle maintenance.

To give some examples of how this applies to coding:

  • The section on how to approach the motorcycle with a 'quality mindset' that leads to progress is just as applicable to reaching 'the zone' in programming.
  • The section on 'gumption traps' that prevent progress and lead to you damaging the machine is priceless. The solutions that are presented work just as well when trying to modify legacy code without introducing bugs.
  • The section on how a purely classical description of an engine part is useless (because it lacks any place for the user to stand) should be read by anyone involved in requirements analysis.

Long story short its a good read :-)

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I would have to argue against this one. One of the more overrated books I have had the misfortune to take up. Pop-philosophical banalities. –  R. Van Hoose Oct 6 '08 at 13:58
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This book taught me how to bridge some artistic/technical, logical/emotional gaps. I am glad I read this book. –  jskulski Jan 26 '09 at 7:28
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This is one of the best books I have read. It taught me why I should care and strive for Quality in my work. –  Epitaph Feb 2 '09 at 19:56
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AMEN AMEN AMEN! This book is DEEP and EXCELLENT. It puts words on what is actually going on when we write software (and when humans make art, or music, or teach grammar, or write novels). Not following the principles in this book leads to "Dilbert-ness". –  Charlie Flowers Mar 23 '09 at 2:30
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In 1975 I had a nervous breakdown while reading page 119 of this book. It took me a year to recover and then I ended up in Scientology for the next 4 years. I don't know if that counts as a recommendation or not. :-) –  Peter Rowell Dec 14 '09 at 20:07

Ender's Game by Orson Scott Card

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Summary: Ender, an intelligent but isolated young boy, is taken from his family to a space station where he is trained to command ships to destroy the alien Bugger race. Sounds cheesy, but for me the personalities and interactions of OSC's characters make all his books a level above most SF. –  j_random_hacker Jan 31 '09 at 3:51
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This is possibly one of the only series which had me looking for the next book as soon as I finished the one I was on. –  bcasp Feb 2 '09 at 19:54
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This book is overrated unless you read it the first time when you are an angsty teenage geek. I know no one (myself included) who has read this later in life who found it a "must" read. –  jmucchiello May 8 '09 at 2:07
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"Creating the Innocent Killer" ( www4.ncsu.edu/~tenshi/Killer_000.htm ) is a good analysis of some of the problems I personally had with Ender's Game. –  Svend Jul 1 '09 at 22:58
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@jmucchiello, I just read it for the first time a couple of months ago. Loved it. I say it's a must read. Currently making my way through the rest of the series. –  thorncp Oct 20 '09 at 23:09

Cryptonomicon

by Neal Stephenson

Cryptonomicon by Neal Stephenson

This book follows parallel stories of a World War II code breaker and his present day descendant, and deals a lot with the development of computers (Alan Turing is actually a character in the book). A geek's must-read!

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I would add Snow Crash too, but I don't want to be too much of a fanboy. :) –  Kip Oct 1 '08 at 14:37
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Arguably a programming book. :) –  Bill the Lizard Nov 7 '08 at 15:02

The Visual Display of Quantitative Information

by Edward Tufte

The Visual Display of Quantitative Information

Discusses how to graphically represent different types of complex data

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All of Tufte's books are very good. –  Scottie T Oct 7 '08 at 19:42
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+1. His short essay on the dangers of powerpoint is excellent too. –  Chet Jul 2 '09 at 2:02
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This is practically an art book. His examples alone are a treasure. –  harpo Aug 21 '09 at 18:53

The Elements of Style

by William Strunk & E.B. White

alt text

We got a copy in our R&D library after coming across Joshua Bloch's (of Effective Java fame) recommendation for it:

This slim volume preaches the gospel of simplicity and clarity as it applies to English prose. If you take it to heart, it will improve your coding as well as your prose.

In another interview Bloch elaborates on why this is good for programmers:

I believe that reading Strunk and White will make you a better developer because good programming and good writing are both about clarity and economy of expression. You can't write good code or good prose unless you understand what it is you're trying to say. Many of Strunk and White's admonitions have direct analogues for software. For example, Strunk and White say, "Omit needless words!" where Andy Hunt and Dave Thomas ("The Pragmatic Programmers") say, "Don't repeat yourself." Strunk and White say, "Revise and Rewrite," where Martin Fowler says, "refactor." And the list goes on.

Now, personally I think some of the advice in The Elements of Style is a bit aged, as usage of English has evolved (e.g., nowadays it's quite ok to start a sentence with "However," or to use "hopefully" instead of "I hope"). But for the most part I agree with Mr Bloch, and enjoyed reading this.

Edit: Oh, here's what Jeff Atwood more recently had to say about The Elements of Style. Perhaps he's an even better known figure around here than Josh Bloch ;)

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+1. Best line in the book. "Omit needless words." –  Genericrich Jan 31 '09 at 23:23
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Checkout the Language Blog, not everyone agrees with this. –  Richard Feb 26 '09 at 21:23
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LanguageLog calls it "[an] odious booklet" : itre.cis.upenn.edu/~myl/languagelog/archives/004176.html –  Michael Paulukonis Apr 10 '09 at 12:55
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Linguists pretty much universally agree that this book has some terrible advice that has led many writers astray. Particularly the completely made up and arbitrary rules like "don't split infinitives", "'that' and 'which' are never interchangeable", and "don't end a sentence with a preposition". –  Kip Jul 2 '09 at 2:33
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Best line in the book: "When engaging in the authorship of English prose, do whole-heartedly endeavor to make all possible efforts to be economical in your choice of verbiage and phrasing." –  Ben Nov 8 '09 at 7:59

I can't believe I didn't see this already listed:

Dune

by Frank Herbert

Dune Cover

Dune is the pinnacle of Sci-Fi novels!

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Dune is the best Sci-Fi book. –  Luc M Apr 26 '09 at 20:00
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Dune is space-opera at it's finest. –  Svend Jul 1 '09 at 22:59
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@Svend: It's technically a planetary romance (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Planetary_romance). :) I agree about it being the finest though, without doubt! –  Noldorin Aug 22 '09 at 19:52
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A+. Must read for an aspiring prophet! –  utku_karatas Oct 20 '09 at 15:09
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@chris Simmons: For the love of Syanoq, please don't even look at any of the later Herbert Jr./Anderson crapola. Jus read books 5 and 6 again if you get that urge. Beware the faster Teg. –  Christopher Mahan Nov 8 '09 at 8:10

The Art of War - Sun Tzu

The Art of War

Wikipedia: Much of the text is about how to fight wars without actually having to do battle: it gives tips on how to outsmart one's opponent so that physical battle is not necessary. As such, it has found application as a training guide for many competitive endeavors that do not involve actual combat.

This knowledge would surely be useful in the everyday "battles" we have to fight in and out of the office. It's also filled with quotes you can impress your fellow programmers with... :)

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10  
Why Alice in wonderland got more votes than this, I will never know. –  amischiefr Aug 19 '09 at 15:04
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Alice in wonderland was quoted (far too heavily, in my opinion) in the Matrix. Hence, geeks will tend to identify with it. I'm betting most of them have never read the Art of War. –  A. Levy Aug 25 '09 at 4:01
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+1 Man. This is one of the world's greatest books, I have ever read. If you understand what Suntsu means, and transfer it to nowadays life is much easier. –  Julius F Oct 20 '09 at 11:40

My recommendation would be: read anything that is outside your usual scope.

Really - anything will broaden your horizon. This does not only apply to programmers and developers. I think everyone would do better having an interest in something that you don't already spend 8-12 hours a day.

Personally, I sometimes feel like a real world idiot because my personal library of books on all kind of topics related to computers is growing and growing and I can never relax - I mean, I spend roughly 10 hours a day with them and then I am reading a book on design patterns before I go to bed. How sick is that? ;)

My current refuge is my newspaper subscription, and various other magazines I pick up every so often when I go by a news stand. Most of them have nothing to do with technology and programming. I made a habit going out for a coffee in the morning, taking the newspaper along and reading something else, or meeting friends and just chatting away.

So, just to make it more clear - I know that a newspaper or any magazine is not as current and up to date as a website. But this allows me to not read it on a screen and do something outside the usual.

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This is one of the best recommendations ever, and I am terrible at following it. –  James Schek Dec 14 '09 at 15:52

Snow Crash By Neal Stephenson

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I read that recently, on someone's recommendation. I was disappointed - it seemed rather dated. –  Ian Dickinson Oct 6 '08 at 12:37
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This book was the inspiration for this answer. –  Robert S. Apr 9 '09 at 20:06
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I read it and was very disappointed. It makes me wonder about some other books on this list since this is rated so highly. –  Joe Philllips Apr 18 '09 at 10:33
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I actually enjoy this book again and again. Not only because of those plenty moments where you recognise some of the recently hyped applications but for the style of writing as well. Obviously not all technological ideas are Stephenson's inventions, but he goes beyond known concepts, both in maturity of description as well as in technical detail. His scenery is inspirational and realistic enough to serve as example. No wonder we nowadays recognise "earth" or "second life" as being inspired by this book. And then there are the characters which one can both wonder about and identify with. –  Don Johe Jul 20 '09 at 13:51

Lewis Carroll "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland"

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Don't forget the sequel "Through the Looking Glass"! –  TobiX Sep 19 '08 at 18:22
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Huge Alice fan but I didn't really like the sequel. –  Benjamin Confino Apr 11 '09 at 19:07
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I love Alice it relaxes me - my #1 favorite :) –  Ennovy Aug 19 '09 at 13:49
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Add "Through the Looking Glass" for an insightful discourse on naming thing (the White Knight's song). If you get that, you should get pointers. –  David Thornley Aug 19 '09 at 14:52
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"The best book on programming for the layman is 'Alice in Wonderland'; but that's because it's the best book on anything for the layman." Alan Perlis –  Jeremy Friesner Aug 22 '09 at 20:21

Isaac Asimov's Foundation Series is brilliant!

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Great stuff. I found the theory in this book to be a lot like an introduction to sociology through chaos theory. An amazing take on societal development. Easy and fun, but with some weight. –  Beska Apr 9 '09 at 20:57
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Violence is the last refuge of the incompetent. –  Si. Dec 15 '09 at 6:00
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Much better than Dune, in my opinion. –  T . Apr 16 '10 at 8:04

Really? No one has yet mentioned the Lord of the Rings?

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In addition to being a spectacular piece of writing in it's own right, it's also the foundation of (almost all) modern fantasy fiction. (Also, and maybe more to the point for a group of computer programmers, one of the core inspirations for Dungeons & Dragons.)

Back a ways, the three books every programmer had to have read to be able to participate in the lunchtime conversation was the Lord of the Rings, Dune, and Hitchhiker's Guide. (This is a slight exaggeration.)

If you've only seen the movies, give the books a try.

From a technical perspective, the book's fundamental message that "unimportant" people can have a profound and positive effect on the world and organizations around them can be very hopeful to all of us doing "big corp" programming.

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I'll add that there are points about working on a team, even when some members are there to sabotage, some are selfish or don't belong, and when deadlines and Sauron loom - you can still make it to the other side! –  anonymous coward Oct 1 '09 at 16:56
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+1 if only for the fact that my legal middle name from birth (and quoted on my birth certificate) is "Strider". No joke. –  Avery Payne Dec 22 '09 at 19:43
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@Strider - that is excellent. I suspect my parents at least discussed doing something similar. –  Electrons_Ahoy Dec 24 '09 at 0:15
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I call LotR the DBZ of books. You can read/watch for hours and nothing substance will happen. –  acidzombie24 Jun 10 '10 at 3:37

Flatland, by Abbott alt text

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The book is old enough it is public domain now. You can read the FULL thing here: geom.uiuc.edu/~banchoff/Flatland –  Simucal Feb 1 '09 at 0:06
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There was a sequel, too, written by a different author who was also a mathematician. He uses it to further explore the concepts involved, as well as several new ones. –  staticsan Feb 1 '09 at 22:10
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Spaceland, by Rudy Rucker, is a great modern version of Flatland. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spaceland_(novel) –  Nate Kohl Jul 2 '09 at 0:55
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Another modern version is Flatterland (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flatterland) –  Chris Simmons Aug 14 '09 at 21:32
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What, no "Planiverse"? –  CodeSlave Oct 1 '09 at 17:15

The Screwtape Letters

by C. S. Lewis

Imagine a demon "programming" a human...

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Great book. And great way to get programmers thinking about the greater realities. –  Eric Wilson Apr 9 '09 at 16:22
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Note that this is a book related to Christianity. –  aehlke Jul 24 '09 at 14:28
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This is certainly the best of his books about Christianity. –  hatfinch Aug 19 '09 at 14:09
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In response to the Christianity comment - I was inspired by this book and I'm not religious at all. "He who feels without acting will lose the ability to act and eventually the ability to feel". I don't see that as particularly Christian - that's just a statement about being human. –  Andrew Shepherd Oct 20 '09 at 23:11
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I don't think I've ever been more surprised by something on StackOverflow. I would agree that it is about Christianity, but it's also about human nature as mentioned, and a quite brilliant treating of the topic too. I would disagree that it assumes you believe in demons, because I would say the book is not about demons at all, but about people. This is probably my favorite book of all time, but I never in a million years thought it would get a mention on StackOverflow. –  Instance Hunter Nov 8 '09 at 8:00

Neuromancer

By William Gibson. He coined the term cyberspace, and the sprawl triology is the reason I wanted to be a code cowboy.

alt text

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Ahh, was looking for this one. Read it probably 100 times while in high school. I have autographed first edition of it now. Dated, but still a classic. Definitely made me want to be a network coder! –  Jason Short Apr 21 '09 at 3:38
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The irony is that he wrote these books to discourage the technophilia that so permeates society of today (and then). =) –  J. Steen Apr 27 '09 at 8:38
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I've had many editions of this book but never one with that cover! Cool edition! –  Simucal Jul 2 '09 at 0:49
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Also ironic that Gibson is (or at least he was at the time he wrote those books) completely ignorant of current day technology. He wrote the books using an old school typewriter. And when he finally later got a computer, he thought that the humming from the hard drive was an indication that it was broken somehow. –  Pete Sep 11 '09 at 6:16
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Personally, I have to say that I found the book boring and hugely uninspiring and don’t understand the fuss at all. So hey coined the term “cyberspace”, and well done. But that doesn’t make the book any more interesting. The story is horribly convoluted and contrived, the characters are clichés and the would-be Chandleresque writing style isn’t exactly high literature either. Didn’t enjoy, wouldn’t recommend. –  Konrad Rudolph Nov 8 '09 at 8:52

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time

by Mark Haddon

alt text

It will give you some perspective of your odd co-workers.

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This book is REALLY good. It really helped me understand autism/Asperger's (the guy who wrote it spent a lot of time working with autistic kids, and from personal experience with kids with asperger's, it seems to be pretty accurate) –  Mongoose Jan 31 '09 at 23:27
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Just one warning - don't start reading it if you're meant to be doing something else. I read it in one sitting - it's really hard to put down. –  Andrew Shepherd Jul 2 '09 at 2:22
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I highly recommend this book. –  Tim Post Nov 13 '09 at 6:07
1  
This is a very very good book. I still inadvertedly count the sequences of red cars on my way to work and I read this book 7 years ago :) –  glasnt Feb 25 '10 at 1:39
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I always find it fasinating that this book is so well liked. I never got into it and actually never finished it as a result. I must have missed something, since everyone I talk to loved it... –  JoshFinnie Mar 29 '10 at 19:07

Philip K. Dick: Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?

And everything else he wrote, of course:)

His mind-bending stories sure help to think more out of the box.

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Fantastic book AND movie for programmers! Also, just about all of PKD's other books (although not necessarily movies e.g. Paycheck...). Obviously Total Recall is a terrific movie though. –  Troy Nichols Apr 10 '09 at 0:27
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Yeah, it was the inspiration for Blade Runner (according to the podcast I heard today). –  Sam Schutte Apr 27 '09 at 20:02
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Ubik by Dick is also fantastic, and being turned into a movie. –  aehlke Jul 24 '09 at 14:29

The Inmates Are Running the Asylum

by Alan Cooper

alt text

It's about using the right language to talk about projects - using stories (and personas) instead of 'features' to talk about stuff that needs to be realized. Also a lot of emphasis on interaction design and related activities. Delivering what is needed instead of what is asked for.

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Would someone at least comment here what this book is about? Thanks. –  sep332 Nov 10 '08 at 18:50
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I'd say it's about using the right language to talk about projects - using stories (and personas) instead of 'features' to talk about stuff that needs to be realized. Also a lot of emphasis on interaction design and related activities. Delivering what is needed instead of what is asked for. –  Simon Groenewolt Feb 2 '09 at 19:52
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Put more simply, the book says that programmers most often write programs that are usable primarily by other programmers (hence the title). It presents methodologies to ensure that programs are written to the domain of the users, not the developers. Great book. –  CMPalmer Aug 24 '09 at 15:46
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This looks like a programming book (properly, broadly construed) to me. –  Novelocrat Oct 7 '09 at 16:56

The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People

by Stephen Covey

You are missing out on a lot of your potential if you have not read this book.

Originally taken from @John Channing's post

Edit: Now available as a free audiobook.

Comments by Julie:
This book has universal value - not just for software developers. Whereas Getting Things Done helps you manage day-to-day activites, 7 Habits helps you keep a high-level vision of life and a general methodology that you need to turn into specifics. It's the perfect complement to Getting Things Done in that regard.

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One key idea I took away from "Seven Habits" is distinguishing between what is important, and what is simply urgent (but not important.) Good read. –  Chris W. Rea May 12 '09 at 11:37
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Can't stand this kind of book –  razenha May 28 '09 at 18:25
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A friend once commented that the first habit of highly effective people is not wasting time reading books like this. Good ideas but padded to the point of absolute tedium to make it a full book size. Would have been so much better had it been 100 pages long. –  Jon Hopkins Jul 28 '09 at 8:47
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Read the index and you're set. –  Iuvat Aug 21 '09 at 20:20
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You can save some time and money by reading the Wikipedia page for it. –  Dana Robinson Sep 30 '09 at 16:57

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