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This is a poll asking the Stackoverflow community what non-programming books they would recommend to fellow programmers.

Please read the following before posting:

  • Please post only ONE BOOK PER ANSWER.

  • Please search for your recommendation on this page before posting (there are over NINE PAGES so it is advisable to check them all). Many books have already been suggested and we want to avoid duplicates. If you find your recommendation is already present, vote it up or add some commentary.

  • Please elaborate on why you think a given book is worth reading from a programmer's perspective.

Note: this article is similar and contains other useful suggestions.

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locked by Robert Harvey Mar 17 '12 at 15:04

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can somebody with account on meta. put in a request for in-answers search? –  zvolkov Jul 20 '09 at 16:37
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@zvolkov: The request is already there, Jeff says it's a low priority. I upvoted the question. (meta.stackexchange.com/questions/1274/…) –  Peter Di Cecco Aug 19 '09 at 14:00
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Does anyone see the difference between this list and "What books should geeks read?" lists? –  HuBeZa Aug 20 '09 at 9:26
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zvolkov, you already have an account on meta! Meta uses the same openID protocol just as SO does. So you don't need to register an account if you already use an openID provider. –  Travis Aug 22 '09 at 1:30
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It is really lame that people closed this. –  ChaosPandion Dec 17 '09 at 21:01
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316 Answers 316

How To Read A Book

Cover of How To Read A Book

I'm amazed no one has mentioned this book. It gives guidelines on how to critically read classical books of any genre and tradition. To quote the first sentence of the book itself:

This is a book for readers and for those who wish to become readers.

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Never Eat Alone: And Other Secrets to Success, One Relationship at a Time

by Keith Ferrazzi

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Comments from duplicate answer by Flory:
I did not think that I would like it before I got the book but I really enjoyed it. It is basically about how to build a relationships. Prior to reading it I expected it to be very trite and about how to use people for your own ends. Instead it was the opposite in how to be used to everyone's ends. Very interesting.

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But I like eating alone. –  PeterAllenWebb Aug 14 '09 at 20:30
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Influence

Influence - the psychology of persuasion is a great intro to the psychology of getting your way. An easy and interesting read, with lots of good examples.

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As a developer, being able to influence customer decision making is a key part of the job, IMHO. If you can't influence your customer at all, or worst, lack the ability to say "no", then you will be stuck implementing features that ought to have been put down. Moreover, I've actually read this book, and I enjoyed it thoroughly. I'm voting it up. –  Chris W. Rea May 12 '09 at 11:26
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Waltzing With Bears

by Tom DeMarco and Timothy Lister

Waltzing With Bears

Great background on what managing risk means and lots of good tools for quantifying risks. They discuss a risk estimation tool which uses statistics to produce a pragmatic and reality-based understanding of the effects that risks will have on a given projects completion date and confidence level.

The prologue on "The Ethics of Belief" is not to be missed.

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Where Wizards Stay Up Late: The Origins Of The Internet

by Katie Hafner

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For anyone who has ever been curious as to the origins of the Internet. The book pulls from the shadows and brings to life some of the great minds that conspired to make the world as we know it possible.

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My favorite book:

The Glass Bead Game

by Hermann Hesse

Only reason I can find why I would recommend it to other programmers is that
I'm a programmer myself and I really enjoyed it.

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A Random Walk Down Wall Street

Burton G. Malkiel

Nothing else will teach you better how to get a handle on your money.

Wikipedia article

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As well as the mentioned Gadwell's Tipping Point, Blink is a good choice.

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Hackers: Heroes of the Computer Revolution

by Steven Levy

Does a great job of outlining some of the eras in computing, from the enviroment that sprung up around the Tech Model Railroad Club at MIT, to the Homebrew Computing in the bay area, to the story of the game companies of the early 80s. Especially the MIT section has wonderful descriptions of hackers at work, doing what they do best (in a wholly non-technical writing style), bumming instructions, making the machine do their bidding, and in the mid-seventies, it describes the self-made community of hardware hackers (including Wozniak), who built their own computers. Hugely entertaining, and a good way to understand where some of these communities originate from (academics, hackers, tinkeres).

Cover for Hackers: Heroes of the Computer Revolution

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Awesome novel by James Clavell that I would recommend to anyone - great storytelling, characters, plot. Toronaga is a brilliant character.

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Labyrinths, Jorge Luis Borges
This collection of short stories contains, among others, "The Library of Babel". Lifted from Wikipedia, I think this explains well how Borges' mind could appeal to the software engineer...

Borges's narrator describes how his universe consists of an endless expanse of interlocking hexagonal rooms, each of which contains the bare necessities for human survival—and four walls of bookshelves. Though the order and content of the books is random and apparently completely meaningless, the inhabitants believe that the books contain every possible ordering of just a few basic characters (letters, spaces and punctuation marks). Though the majority of the books in this universe are pure gibberish, the library also must contain, somewhere, every coherent book ever written, or that might ever be written, and every possible permutation or slightly erroneous version of every one of those books. The narrator notes that the library must contain all useful information, including predictions of the future, biographies of any person, and translations of every book in all languages. Conversely, for many of the texts some language could be devised that would make it readable with any of a vast number of different contents. Despite — indeed, because of — this glut of information, all books are totally useless to the reader, leaving the librarians in a state of suicidal despair. However, Borges speculates on the existence of the "Crimson Hexagon", containing a book that contains the log of all the other books; the librarian who reads it is akin to God.

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One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey

Totally unrelated to software development, but highly entertaining. Teaches a lot about human behaviour and interaction. Might help you out if your manager's a Nurse Ratched...

The movie was good too.

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Hagakure: The Book of the Samurai

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Thoughts about honor, bravery and commitment from a Samurai perspective. When I had to go to talk/demo to a big audience and was nervous and wasn't that sure that everything works as it should, I used to quote the book to myself: "A samurai must consider himself already dead".

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I can't believe this one isn't posted yet!

The Princess Bride by William Goldman - it's one of the most hilarious books I have ever writtenread (Doh!), and much better (in ways) than the movie. Seriously, you haven't read this yet? Go now!

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You wrote it? :D –  Bobby Jun 8 '10 at 14:56
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I just got too darn excited! What can I say? I love to read! –  Wayne Werner Jun 8 '10 at 17:24
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Orbiting the Giant Hairball

Orbiting the Giant Hairball: A Corporate Fool's Guide to Surviving with Grace
by Gordon Mackenzie

A short well written book with some great illustrations - explains how most large organisations don't really understand how to deal with creative people, and how such places are usually run so that the creatives/engineers are powerless. Mackenzie recounts his (mostly positive) experiences at Hallmark.

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Tolstoy's War and Peace. It's an immense (and immensely awesome) classic work of literature. Reading it and re-reading it, analyzing it time and again--all this will help you start thinking in terms of understanding instead of knowing, something we could all benefit from as developers.

EDIT

I recommend the Anne Dunigan (sp.?) translation especially.

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These two classics are a must read. I find Thoreau a breath of fresh air. Of course Walden harkens back to a simpiler time when emails weren't life and death. I won't lie and say much of it isn't romanticised by the author but it is a nice take on doing without and doesn't leave you with a faint whiff of patchouli like "In To The Wild" does.

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Daniel Dennett's Consciousness Explained:

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Little Brother

by Cory Doctorow

This is a great book for readers of any age. Think 1984 mixed with Stealing the Network.

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Dealers of Lightning

by Michael Hiltzik

The story of Xerox PARC.

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I recommend Steven Pinker's "How the Mind Works" - he outlines how our brains have evolved to work the way they do. It's a fascinating insight into our own personal "thinking machines" - the root of every computer program.

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I would recommend: "Code" by Charles Petzold.

It completely opened my eyes on how computers actually work, explained and illustrated clearly. I learned that computers have no inherent understanding of numbers, letters, words or anything like that. These were human concepts and it was up to the computer programmer (at a very low level) to present they patterns of bits from computer memory to something users would find meaningful.

Despite its title, "Code" has nothing to do with coding, but explains how computers work at the electrical level.

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I am really surprised to see the classic "Pride and Prejudice" by Jane Austen not posted yet!

It's a must read for every one.

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Please elaborate on why you think a given book is worth reading from a programmer's perspective –  JuanZe Nov 13 '09 at 19:32
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Great book just to laugh at what most of us in IT don't have the guts to do/be like.

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I believe Napoleon Hill's Think and Grow Rich is a must read.

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I like the collection offered by PersonalMBA.com - I've made it about halfway through the list. They're books all about how business works, and I think that's an invaluable lesson for programmers to learn. Too often, people in IT can't see beyond the scope of the technology into how it can actually be used to grow the bottom line. Of note, the list includes most of the books already listed in the other answers to this question.

The books I've read from that list haven't made me a better programmer per se (aside from "Mythical Man Month" and a few others), but they have improved the quality of my work as far as the business is concerned. Now that I understand what really drives our company and can put my projects in the context of what other departments are trying to accomplish, I find that people are happier with my software since it helps them do their job, instead of just conforming to their spec.

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