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This is a poll asking the Stackoverflow community what non-programming books they would recommend to fellow programmers.

Please read the following before posting:

  • Please post only ONE BOOK PER ANSWER.

  • Please search for your recommendation on this page before posting (there are over NINE PAGES so it is advisable to check them all). Many books have already been suggested and we want to avoid duplicates. If you find your recommendation is already present, vote it up or add some commentary.

  • Please elaborate on why you think a given book is worth reading from a programmer's perspective.

Note: this article is similar and contains other useful suggestions.

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locked by Robert Harvey Mar 17 '12 at 15:04

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can somebody with account on meta. put in a request for in-answers search? –  zvolkov Jul 20 '09 at 16:37
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@zvolkov: The request is already there, Jeff says it's a low priority. I upvoted the question. (meta.stackexchange.com/questions/1274/…) –  Peter Di Cecco Aug 19 '09 at 14:00
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Does anyone see the difference between this list and "What books should geeks read?" lists? –  HuBeZa Aug 20 '09 at 9:26
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zvolkov, you already have an account on meta! Meta uses the same openID protocol just as SO does. So you don't need to register an account if you already use an openID provider. –  Travis Aug 22 '09 at 1:30
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It is really lame that people closed this. –  ChaosPandion Dec 17 '09 at 21:01

316 Answers 316

Daniel Gilbert - Stumbling Upon Happiness

The long version of Dan Gilbert's Ted Talk

Originally taken from @John Channing's post

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The Age of Spiritual Machines by Raymond Kurzweil. I'll just quote from the linked page:

This extraordinary book by Raymond Kurzweil illustrates the exponential evolution of various technologies in the 21st century, as well as the speeding up of time as order increases. Ray Kurzweil explores a future where the processing power and capacity of the human brain will be inexpensive to purchase, conscious machines demand civil rights, and our ideas of self and spirituality evolve as we merge with technology and extend our lifespans.

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Rich Dad, Poor Dad: What the Rich Teach Their Kids About Money--That the Poor and Middle Class Do Not! by Robert T. Kiyosak

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Here's the secret: the rich systematically f**k over the poor through education, policing, regressive taxing (think bank overdraft penalties and sin taxes), etc so that they don't have a chance in hell to succeed! –  temp2290 Sep 22 '09 at 16:09

Herodotus - The Histories - because a bloke at the other end of time still tells a good'n. Seriously.

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Universal Principles of Design, by William Lidwell, Kritina Holden, and Jill Butler

Universal Principles of Design

One of this biggest issues I have with many programs I have used is the lack of design put into the interface and into the product. This book goes in-depth describing how to enhance the usablilty within a interface. It also tells you all of the basic principals and rules of design, and they give many examples for many different applications whether its techinical or non-technical. The book reads a little like a college classroom book (and it probably is for many design schools), so it the not the most exciting thing to read, but I find the most informative when it comes to interface design.

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The Right Stuff by Tom Wolfe

Amazon

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Inspiration to push farther –  Gratzy Jun 4 '09 at 14:34

Hyperspace: A Scientific Odyssey Through Parallel Universes, Time Warps, and the 10th Dimension

by Michio Kaku

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There's a lot of space out there to get lost in.
-- John Robinson, Lost in Space

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I would highly recommend David Platt, Why software suck and what you can do about it.

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Many stories on what users can use and why you should be a wiser person when developing software, no programming included ;)

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If you're into science fiction then anything by Ian M. Banks and Peter F. Hamilton. Genius...it's like they've been there.

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21st Century Jet: The Making of the Boeing 777, by Karl Sabbagh

From coffee cup holder to three-hundred-foot wing, this book is the story of how a group of people came to build a brand new aeroplane.

The book describes the development of the Boeing 777, from initial concept, through requirements gathering, design, development, testing, production, and delivery. The engineers and management implemented a new development system, overcame changing requirements, met strict safety requirements, and continually optimized the solution. It describes how the designers and engineers worked to make the aircraft easier, safer, and more intuitive for everyone who would come in contact with it (air crew, maintenence crews, and passengers).

Software developers can learn a lot from this book. It's very well written, it reads like a novel. I've read it twice and highly recommend it.

Boeing Computer Services president John Warner said, the Boeing 777 is "three million parts flying in close formation." Sounds like software to me.

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Hard Boiled Wonderland and The End of the World by Haruki Murakami

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As the question says, why do you think it's worth reading from a programmer's perspective? –  Jonik Feb 11 '09 at 21:19

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This book revolutionized the way I think about life. It also has given me many great ideas on how to add memory/prediction models to my software.

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Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath - because everybody should read this book. Even programmers.

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H.P. Lovecraft complete works.

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Uncle Petros and Goldbach's Conjecture

by Apostolos Doxiadis

Uncle Petros and Goldbach's Conjecture

This is an inspiring tale about uncle Petros, a mathematician who became passionate about proving Goldbach's Conjecture and the tale is told from the eyes of his nephew, who is wondering about that mysterious 'uncle' nobody wants to talk about.

Book Review by the Mathematical Association of America:

The book is really the story of two generations of obsession, the one a quest for the solution to a mathematical problem, the other a young man's search for the truth about the uncle his family shuns and derides for having thrown away his life.

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ISHMAEL by Daniel Quinn "Teacher seeks pupil, must have an earnest desire to save the world. Apply in person."

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The Drunkard's Walk by Leonard Mlodinow
A very good history of probability and statistics; the biographical pieces on the "founding fathers" are very entertaining, and a good part of the book also discusses the inadequacies of the human brain when dealing with randomness, which makes it a very useful guidebook on how to avoid dumb mistakes...

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37 signal's Getting Real is an absolute must read. Its common sense stuff that many people ignore.

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Johnathan Strange & Mr. Norrell has absolutely nothing to do with programming on the surface, but I think it expresses exactly what it is like to be a software engineer.

The story is about magicians in England during the Napoleonic Wars. There has ceased to be any 'practical' magicians in England, and there are only 'theoretical' magicians. The plot centers around these two men who become 'practical' magicians. They are surrounded by people who do not understand anything about magic, and make ridiculous requests. When they try to explain why a certain piece of magic cannot be done, how long it would take, or that it has not been done for hundreds of years no one takes any notice. They are forced to dig deep, find what the root problems are and develop solutions and take decisive action. Usually their action is wrong in some way and always seems to upset some and please others.

I believe as software engineers we are very much like these men. Surrounded by business people that have problems, all of which seem to think they know the best way to solve them, but want you to do it. You must wade through all their proposed solutions and half explained problems in order to find the root issue solve it.

If you want to know what it is like being a software engineer, read this book.

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The Blind Watchmaker, Richard Dawkins.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Blind-Watchmaker-Richard-Dawkins/dp/0141026162/ref=sr%5F1%5F1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1260799850&sr=8-1

Because Life is just another branch of Information Technology....

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Ursula LeGuin's Earthsea Quartet. Her chain of stories about Earthsea is deep and philosophical, refreshingly different from the average slash-dragons style fantasy stories.

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A superb four-part fantasy, comparable with the work of Tolkien and C.S. Lewis, the "Earthsea" books follow the fortunes of the wizard Ged from his childhood to an age where magic is giving way to evil. As a young dragonlord, Ged, whose use-name is Sparrowhawk, is sent to the island of Roke to learn the true way of magic. A natural magician, Ged becomes an Archmage and helps the High Priestess Tenar escape from the labyrinth of darkness. But as the years pass, true magic and ancient ways are forced to submit to the powers of evil and death.

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I hope I can post a few books. If not, the first one is Johnathan Livingston Seagull

It's a really neat story about a seagull that decides there must be something more important than just bickering, squawking and fighting over food.

From wikipedia:

Jonathan Livingston Seagull, written by Richard Bach, is a fable in novella form about a seagull learning about life and flight, and a homily about self-perfection.

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The Black Swan: The Impact of the Highly Improbable

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This book as about why stock markets are not predictable like casinos and the lottary. It is very readable though querky. It will help you to understand when statistical techneques do not work, why math is not understanding, why project managers can't predict schedules and how they can with less effort.

The book does not go into heavy math but will give you a feal for when the math can and more ofter can not be used.

Author: Nassim Nicholas Taleb. Also wrote 'Fooled By Randomness'

Read it if you work with mathematics, statistics or finance - Or if you have a pension.

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I used to read a lot of non-technical books ... what everyone would refer to as the classics, Who Moved My Cheese, Getting Things Done, One Minute Manager and so on.

One day I finally realized that all these books were trying to do was prevent me from making mistakes ... which is exactly the opposite of how me, and most people learn. Smart people make mistakes, and fail, quite frequently, but what makes them different is that they learn from their mistakes. How could I learn when the books I was reading were preventing my from some good life lessons?

So from that point on I stopped reading non-technical books ... save for the ones that related to technical management .. which there aren't many. Instead I started reading biographies on business owners, like Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, Steve Ballmer, Larry Ellison and so on. I learned more from these brillant, crazy, egocentric, often times failures that I learned from any of the business books I previously read!

That is where I would start ... read books from people who are successes and failures in the vertical industries you are interested in ... instead of some author who is speaking from second-hand experience.

With that aside, if I had to recommend some non-technical books, I would have to say these are a couple of my classics:

  • Acres of Diamonds by Russell H. Conwell
  • Obvious Adams: The Story of a Successful Businessman by Robert R. Updegraff
  • The Art of War by Sun Tzu
  • The Book of Five Rings by Miyamoto Musashi
  • Machiavelli's The Prince by Niccolo Machiavelli
  • Bible, King James Version

Just my thoughts!

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The OP asked for one book per reply so each could be voted on separately. –  RobH Apr 9 '09 at 18:24

Timothy Ferris - The 4 Hour Work Week

The book you need if you are working hard saving for a retirement that may never come.

Originally taken from @John Channing's post

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I easily think Cryptonomicon is a book everyone with a technical interest should read. It gives an intriguing look into the history of technology, cryptography and post-world-war tech development. As well as beeing filled with fantastic characters!

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There's a Cryptonomicon answer way higher-up (stackoverflow.com/questions/38210/…) - please vote that up instead. Perhaps move the commentary there too. (Yes, this one was posted earlier; it doesn't matter.) –  Jonik Jun 26 '09 at 15:17

Anger Management - 6 Critical Steps to a Calmer Life

For your first day on the job and right after you see what the previous programmer left behind.

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Joel Spolsky's "Best Software Writing I"

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How is that a non-programming book? –  Keith Jan 28 '09 at 12:12

Robot (No, not "I Robot") by Hans Moravec.

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Not only is it an imaginative view of where robots and humans may be heading, but he also throws in some stuff about orbital elevators and time circuits with probability fuses. Cool.

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