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This is a poll asking the Stackoverflow community what non-programming books they would recommend to fellow programmers.

Please read the following before posting:

  • Please post only ONE BOOK PER ANSWER.

  • Please search for your recommendation on this page before posting (there are over NINE PAGES so it is advisable to check them all). Many books have already been suggested and we want to avoid duplicates. If you find your recommendation is already present, vote it up or add some commentary.

  • Please elaborate on why you think a given book is worth reading from a programmer's perspective.

Note: this article is similar and contains other useful suggestions.

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can somebody with account on meta. put in a request for in-answers search? –  zvolkov Jul 20 '09 at 16:37
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@zvolkov: The request is already there, Jeff says it's a low priority. I upvoted the question. (meta.stackexchange.com/questions/1274/…) –  Peter Di Cecco Aug 19 '09 at 14:00
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Does anyone see the difference between this list and "What books should geeks read?" lists? –  HuBeZa Aug 20 '09 at 9:26
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zvolkov, you already have an account on meta! Meta uses the same openID protocol just as SO does. So you don't need to register an account if you already use an openID provider. –  Travis Aug 22 '09 at 1:30
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It is really lame that people closed this. –  ChaosPandion Dec 17 '09 at 21:01

316 Answers 316

The Gospel of the Flying Spaghetti Monster

by Bobby Henderson

(Wiki link)

An elaborate spoof on Intelligent Design, The Gospel of the Flying Spaghetti Monster is neither too elaborate nor too spoofy to succeed in nailing the fallacies of ID. It’s even wackier than Jonathan Swift’s suggestion that the Irish eat their children as a way to keep them from being a burden, and it may offend just as many people, but Henderson, described elsewhere as a 25-year-old “out-of-work physics major,” puts satire to the same serious use that Swift did. Oh, yes, it is very funny.

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The Illuminatus! Trilogy by Robert Shea and Robert Anton Wilson. In many ways, this book changed the way I do my thinking. Not sure whether it is good or bad to completely distrust anything and everything, but at least it keeps ones mind critical instead of automatically accepting something as truth without questioning.

The book also introduced me to the concepts of discordianism, which I find having quite a few interesting points.

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A little off the wall here but I would say "Pillars of the Earth" - Ken Follet.

Apart from being a gripping epic, the parallels you can draw between developing software and running a project, and the craftsmen and "managers" building a Cathedral (and the entire town) are very interesting.

(Also voted for "7 habits of highly effective people" - a classic.)

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The Catcher in the Rye

The Catcher in the Rye

Just a great novel.

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Ugh, worst book ever. Boring, pointless, and annoying! –  Brian Knoblauch Mar 29 '10 at 18:51

I can't believe nobody have mentioned "The Elegant Universe" by Brian Greene. The Elegant Universe

I definitely recommend this to anyone who's interested in quantum physics, universe, and things like that, the main topic of this book is the string theory.

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If you like post-apocalyptic science fiction books then these are probably a must-read:

  • Cormac McCarthy - The Road

The Road

The other one I recommend is here

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+1 to both The Road and Roadside Picnic. They have a similar setting and almost flow together. –  Andrew Scagnelli Aug 21 '09 at 19:43

The Goal: A Process of Ongoing Improvement

by Eliyahu M. Goldratt and Jeff Cox

To elaborate: It is a book on how to approach problems. To identify bottlenecks in your system and work on them. So in short, it isn't a programming book, but shows (in novel format) how to problem solve -- and is thus very valuable to a programmer.

[Update Gishu] It's an eyeopener on how the throughput of your entire system depends on the bottlenecks. Optimizing other stages/operations will not produce any results. Although this is ingrained in developers who have had experience optimizing a scenario in their app; however zooming out to a more higher level and applying this can have profound gains. Beck's XP Book has a dedicated chapter on the Theory Of Constraints. Programmers who move onto Leads/PMs will find this a valuable addition to their toolkit.

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Jeffrey K. Liker - The Toyota Way (Amazon link). A good if at times semi-boring read, but loads of information from the company which invented Lean.

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If you give a mouse a cookie or any other kids books.
Really, spend more time with your children, whenever you can. It's shockingly enjoyable, and you'll be pleasantly surprised at their viewpoints - and how much sense they usually make, even for your own job.
And that specific book? Funny, and explains a LOT about why programmers are the way they are :-) .

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After Dark

by Haruki Murakami

But the why is really more interesting than the what. I look at the suggestions above and they are very instrumental (if not blatantly horrific like the gentleman who recently suggested Atlas Shrugged, a tome of utterly abhorrent writing if there ever was one). The Mythical Man Month is indeed an interesting work but it's not that far removed from our daily business. And I am quite convinced that the imagination needs to be fed as well. Murakami is interesting in that he takes very recognizable situations and twists them around, turns them on their head and spits them back out. And sometimes that is just what we need. There's nothing wrong with winning friends and influencing people. But seriously. Is that the one book you should read when not pouring over some dry text about the benefit of some crap or the other. No. Remember what the door mouse said.

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Not my fave Murakami, but okay. Reading Hard Boiled Wonderland and The End of the World at the moment. Possibly even better than Wind Up Bird. –  Gopherkhan Jan 31 '09 at 3:17

Dale Carnegie - How to Stop Worrying and Start Living.

If you have read How to Win Friends, this should be next.

Originally taken from @John Channing's post.

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Drangonlance Chronicles - Margaret Weis & Tracy Hickman

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The Cuckoo's Egg

by Cliff Stoll

Shows how important the traits like : perseverance, keeping log of things, innovative ways to try out various options are useful while tackling a problem

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Life of Pi: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Life_of_Pi

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Please elaborate on why you think a given book is worth reading from a programmer's perspective –  JuanZe Nov 13 '09 at 19:30

Rick Cook - The Wiz Biz

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This is a compilation of the first two novels in a series, called 'Wizard's Bane' and 'Wizardry Compiled', respectively.

It all began when the wizards of the White League were under attack by their opponents of the Black League and one of their most powerful members cast a spell to bring forth a mighty wizard to aid their cause. What the spell delivers master hacker Walter "Wiz" Zumwalt. With the wizard who cast the spell dead, nobody can figure out what the shanghaied computer nerd is good for--because spells are not like computer programs.

Lots of in jokes for the Unix/Linux crowd to enjoy. Pretty much anybody in the software industry will enjoy it, I think.

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Didn't see it listed yet.. soooo:

Song of Ice and Fire series from George R.R. Martin

By far one of the best fantasy books I have even read...

Song of Ice and Fire

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ugh, horrid books imo. –  Paul Nathan Oct 1 '09 at 16:51
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This is my all time favorite fantasy trilogy. The fourth book not so much and the fifth is vaporware. –  drawnonward Apr 16 '10 at 8:28
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Haha.. I still have hope ;) –  Arcturus Apr 16 '10 at 8:30
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It's funny. I couldn't stand the books really - a small handful of pretty flat characters that I couldn't care less about, living in a world that seems to end just past their fingertips, constantly under threat of invasion by enemies that never really seem to appear, and squabbling over politics and war that somehow manage to be fairly uninteresting. Oddly, I actually enjoy the HBO version, though it follows the books pretty closely (at least season 1). Lends itself very well to TV. –  Eli Jul 30 '11 at 8:12

Turing

by Andrew Hodges

Turing (The Great Philosophers Series) (Paperback)

Life of the first programmer.

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Just to be clear, he wasn't the first programmer. en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ada_Lovelace –  Singletoned Oct 5 '09 at 14:57

Enigma: The Battle for the Code

by Hugh Sebag-Montefiore

alt text

Having a bad week at work? Well at least when you can't figure out some algorithm people aren't dying in their hundreds in the freezing North Atlantic waiting on you to work it out.

As well as being a great read about the dawn of the modern computing age, this book can help with perspective.

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Harry Potter! It'll give you insight into another arcane discipline practiced by weird and eccentrically-dressed people.

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Good to Great

by Jim Collins

Good to Great is a fascinating look at some of the factors that contribute to very successful companies. Jim Collins' definition of 'great' is exacting; companies that did at better than the market at least three times over a 15-year period (of a 40-year stretch) even when their markets were depressed. It is a refreshing text because at its core the message is well known to most software developers; its not enough to have an intelligent and passionate workforce, you also need the management flexibility in order really grow a company.

Full of data but an easy read, this is one of my favourite books and one I always recommend. If you have any interest in the process of business, I highly recommend it.

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Since the link is broken, and the post doesn't give the title, it's not that surprising. –  Pete Kirkham Jun 10 '10 at 15:19

Musashi by Eiji Yoshikawa gives some pretty good life lessons. The story is about a young Samurai in the 1600 that is at principle very angry and stubborn, but after commiting many crimes he gets imprisioned for 3 years, while locked away he regret his past and decide to go on a self improving journey to learn the way of the sword in order improve as a person. You can apply it to become a better professional yourself, through his journeys Musashi learned many thing, specially how people behave and how to lead by example.

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If you live on the Unix side of the world, The Art of UNIX Programming by Eric Raymond (see also here). Despite its title, it is not a programming book, and it contains very few lines of code indeed. It's the best book I know about the Unix philosophy.

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The art of UNIX programming is not about programming? I think that's a hard sell. –  Svend Jul 1 '09 at 23:04

Mary Shelley's Frankenstein

Every scientist/programmer should read this book. It tells you to know your limits and be bold at the same time.

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Just about anything by Michael Crichton. He researched his subject matter so thoroughly reading one of his novels was also a crash course in whatever he was writing about, whether it was nanotechnology, reconstituting DNA from fossils or airline crash investigations.

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This is a tough crowd. –  PaulG May 14 '09 at 16:03
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@Shiva - he's anti-science, for one thing. He even believes in spoon-bending! –  ctd Nov 10 '09 at 17:51

Crossing the Chasm

by Geoffrey A Moore

If you ever think you will be working for a high-tech company, you should at least skim this book. It describes the lifecycle of a high-tech product (or company) and just knowing the terminology (and implications) from this book help immensely in figuring out if management has a clue or is drinking kool-aid. It's a fun read, too.

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The Singularity Is Near

by Ray Kurzweil

Surprised there hasn't been as many readers of this book as I initially thought. This book is about the Singularity, how AI will play into our future, and what we can do to be one with it. It challenges religion (please don't start any wars over it) and how ultra-intelligence will integrate with our race. Truly an amazing piece of literature, and so far I'm only about 100 pages in. great read if you want to think more "exponentially" and less "linearly".

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Kurzweil is optimistic to the point of insanity. His predictions are just flat-out silly. –  Dana Robinson Sep 30 '09 at 17:04

Women

Women

Just because people like Bukowski always were able to get me away from my PC : tx!

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Outliers: The Story of Success by Malcolm Gladwell

I just bought it on Audible last week and I can't stop listening to it. It goes through the factors of successful people (ex: Bill Gates, Bill Joy, The Beatles). Fascinating!

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The Deadline by Tom DeMarco

The Deadline

If you normally fall asleep while reading books about project management, give this one a try - I found the story simply fun to read yet learned a lot of solid basics while reading it, and if you ever had to do a project on an impossible timeline you'll feel right at home with this book.

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Facts and Fallacies of Software Engineering

by Robert L. Glass

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See Jeff Atwood's post about this: codinghorror.com/blog/archives/001083.html. Hmm, is this really a non-programming book, by the way? –  Jonik Apr 9 '09 at 19:29
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It is a non-programming with the concept that it does not have any programming methodologies or techniques, etc. But it is software related of course. –  dimitris mistriotis Jun 6 '09 at 21:54

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