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This is a poll asking the Stackoverflow community what non-programming books they would recommend to fellow programmers.

Please read the following before posting:

  • Please post only ONE BOOK PER ANSWER.

  • Please search for your recommendation on this page before posting (there are over NINE PAGES so it is advisable to check them all). Many books have already been suggested and we want to avoid duplicates. If you find your recommendation is already present, vote it up or add some commentary.

  • Please elaborate on why you think a given book is worth reading from a programmer's perspective.

Note: this article is similar and contains other useful suggestions.

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can somebody with account on meta. put in a request for in-answers search? –  zvolkov Jul 20 '09 at 16:37
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@zvolkov: The request is already there, Jeff says it's a low priority. I upvoted the question. (meta.stackexchange.com/questions/1274/…) –  Peter Di Cecco Aug 19 '09 at 14:00
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Does anyone see the difference between this list and "What books should geeks read?" lists? –  HuBeZa Aug 20 '09 at 9:26
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zvolkov, you already have an account on meta! Meta uses the same openID protocol just as SO does. So you don't need to register an account if you already use an openID provider. –  Travis Aug 22 '09 at 1:30
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It is really lame that people closed this. –  ChaosPandion Dec 17 '09 at 21:01

316 Answers 316

The Inmates Are Running the Asylum

by Alan Cooper

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It's about using the right language to talk about projects - using stories (and personas) instead of 'features' to talk about stuff that needs to be realized. Also a lot of emphasis on interaction design and related activities. Delivering what is needed instead of what is asked for.

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Would someone at least comment here what this book is about? Thanks. –  sep332 Nov 10 '08 at 18:50
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I'd say it's about using the right language to talk about projects - using stories (and personas) instead of 'features' to talk about stuff that needs to be realized. Also a lot of emphasis on interaction design and related activities. Delivering what is needed instead of what is asked for. –  Simon Groenewolt Feb 2 '09 at 19:52
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Put more simply, the book says that programmers most often write programs that are usable primarily by other programmers (hence the title). It presents methodologies to ensure that programs are written to the domain of the users, not the developers. Great book. –  CMPalmer Aug 24 '09 at 15:46
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This looks like a programming book (properly, broadly construed) to me. –  Novelocrat Oct 7 '09 at 16:56

I think this was covered pretty well in another question (Best non-development book for software developers).

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The Mythical Man-Month

by Fred Brooks

The Mythical Man Month

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Very interesting book –  Kristian Sep 19 '08 at 17:09
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How is this a non-programming book? –  MusiGenesis Oct 7 '08 at 19:24
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-1 because, even thouth this is a good book, it is about programming –  Gabe Moothart Apr 9 '09 at 22:14
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@tomjen Okay, but to someone who read The Mythical Man Month before finding those blogs, you recognize one of their influences. It's a bit exteme to call it worthless just because the advice is good enough to have been repeated by some of SO's favorite bloggers. –  ojrac Jul 1 '09 at 21:29
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@tomjen I can't imagine why anyone thinks Casablanca is a good movie, everything about it is cliche. Yeah, it isn't full of new ideas now after its bones have been picked clean over the past few decades. But it is an excellent PROGRAMMING book. –  sal Aug 21 '09 at 21:03

How to Win Friends and Influence People

by Dale Carnegie

How to Win Friends and Influence People

Although this was first published in 1936, the advice contained within is still as fresh and appropriate as ever. Don't be put off by the name. This isn't some underhand guide to having your way with unsuspecting victims, but rather common sense advice on how to get on with people, how to nurture relationships and make the most of yourself and your fellow man (and woman).

It is well known that technical folk (including programmers) are often thought of as not being terribly 'people oriented' (whether this is a justified stereotype or not is subject of another discussion) and so this book is an invaluable resource for teaching you the finer points of human interaction.

It's warm, heartfelt, sturdy, straightforward and timelessly written. Highly recommended.

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Yeah, I did exactly the same thing and resisted this book for ages because of the title. It really is a much more gentle and honorable book than the title suggests, though. –  Charles Roper Oct 22 '08 at 17:46
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I wrote a blog post about this if you are at all interested: fitnessconnections.com/blog/post/2008/10/… –  Kyle B. Feb 2 '09 at 20:01
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OMG! That's Jon Skeet on the front! –  Skilldrick Feb 27 '09 at 15:37
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+1 - I've read the book twice. It has been more valuable to me than any individual technical book in my career. –  Kyle B. Apr 4 '09 at 6:24
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This book isn't bad, but there are better ones. Once you get halfway through, you start to feel like this guy is hacking relationships instead of forging them. –  bobobobo Jul 2 '09 at 1:52

Jeffrey K. Liker - The Toyota Way (Amazon link). A good if at times semi-boring read, but loads of information from the company which invented Lean.

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My recommendation would be: read anything that is outside your usual scope.

Really - anything will broaden your horizon. This does not only apply to programmers and developers. I think everyone would do better having an interest in something that you don't already spend 8-12 hours a day.

Personally, I sometimes feel like a real world idiot because my personal library of books on all kind of topics related to computers is growing and growing and I can never relax - I mean, I spend roughly 10 hours a day with them and then I am reading a book on design patterns before I go to bed. How sick is that? ;)

My current refuge is my newspaper subscription, and various other magazines I pick up every so often when I go by a news stand. Most of them have nothing to do with technology and programming. I made a habit going out for a coffee in the morning, taking the newspaper along and reading something else, or meeting friends and just chatting away.

So, just to make it more clear - I know that a newspaper or any magazine is not as current and up to date as a website. But this allows me to not read it on a screen and do something outside the usual.

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This is one of the best recommendations ever, and I am terrible at following it. –  James Schek Dec 14 '09 at 15:52

Getting Things Done

by David Allen.

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I totally recommend this one. It won't change your life, but it will help you think about productivity and procrastination as just another problem to be solved, and not as just an inherent flaw that you have to live with. That mindset shift makes all the difference to a lazy dude like me :) –  Brandon Yarbrough Apr 9 '09 at 20:19
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Don't be skeptical! I was too at first, but then I read it and I was honestly stunned to find out I had doubled my productivity within days and literally had almost eliminated all stress. I finally feel in control of my life, and I know this sounds like some sales pitch, but its true. –  James Simpson Jul 23 '09 at 3:41
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+1 just applying the "do immediately what you can do in 2 minutes" will clear your life up considerably. –  pageman Aug 21 '09 at 20:51
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I keep meaning to go out and get this book. –  Kaz Dragon Dec 14 '09 at 16:09
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@Neil N ibiblio.org/purvis/GTD-flowchart.png –  John Nolan Aug 26 '10 at 22:03

Who Moved My Cheese?

by Spencer Johnson

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All about accepting change will happen. Can easily be read in an hour on a plane.

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Ugh. Everyone at an old job of mine was given this tripe to read (right before a heavy round of downsizing). I used to infuriate my boss when a bug got into production by shrugging and saying, "I guess someone moved your cheese!" –  Dana Oct 6 '08 at 12:46
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Yuk (-1) the classic "you're about to be fired/pay cut - just accept it" book. The overall idea of accepting change is fine, but this book is both trite and patronising. –  Keith Jan 28 '09 at 12:04
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I worked at a place where this was included in the "welcome" kit. This book is intended to make management feel good about the fact that crap rolls downhill. –  joseph.ferris Feb 2 '09 at 20:03
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To be honest, I haven't read the book; but I watched the video, which seemed to be geared toward five-year-olds. Patronizing in the extreme. –  Kyralessa Apr 10 '09 at 1:15
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When I was laid off, the company recommended that we all read it. The only value I could find in it was that, in an organization, it would provide a vocabulary to mock people whose resistance to change was impeding things. It was not at all inspirational for a newly unemployed developer. –  David Thornley Aug 19 '09 at 15:56

The Visual Display of Quantitative Information

by Edward Tufte

The Visual Display of Quantitative Information

Discusses how to graphically represent different types of complex data

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All of Tufte's books are very good. –  Scottie T Oct 7 '08 at 19:42
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+1. His short essay on the dangers of powerpoint is excellent too. –  Chet Jul 2 '09 at 2:02
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This is practically an art book. His examples alone are a treasure. –  harpo Aug 21 '09 at 18:53

Musashi by Eiji Yoshikawa gives some pretty good life lessons. The story is about a young Samurai in the 1600 that is at principle very angry and stubborn, but after commiting many crimes he gets imprisioned for 3 years, while locked away he regret his past and decide to go on a self improving journey to learn the way of the sword in order improve as a person. You can apply it to become a better professional yourself, through his journeys Musashi learned many thing, specially how people behave and how to lead by example.

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Here's a strange one for you all to think about.

On The Road by Jack Kerouac.

It's a modern classic that everybody should read, and I'd be very surprised if English or Media Studies students weren't recommended to read it at some time. Reading should not only be informative and educational, but enjoyable as well. If you're not going to read a book for pure fun now and again then you'll only end up frustrated with the books you need to read as a programmer/developer.

This book is a real eye-opener; a book that'll really make you think about your own life, and for a programmer whom spends their day dealing with pure thought-stuff it's a great way to get you thinking on a different track.

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The Dharma Bums is better if you're into Kerouac. As for the Capote quote, he was responding to the accepted (yet erroneous) myth that Kerouac wrote On the Road in one sitting with no editing. In fact, it took him close to a decade to complete: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/On_the_Road –  Bob Probst Oct 6 '08 at 13:41

Orbiting the Giant Hairball

Orbiting the Giant Hairball: A Corporate Fool's Guide to Surviving with Grace
by Gordon Mackenzie

A short well written book with some great illustrations - explains how most large organisations don't really understand how to deal with creative people, and how such places are usually run so that the creatives/engineers are powerless. Mackenzie recounts his (mostly positive) experiences at Hallmark.

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Dreaming in Code

by Scott Rosenberg (Amazon Wikipedia)

Cover image

A great book about the development process. It also highlights how developers are doomed to keep repeating the same mistakes over and over again

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As with Mythical Man-Month, is this really a non-programming book? It seems to be very much about software development. –  Jonik Apr 5 '09 at 9:43

Dealers of Lightning

by Michael Hiltzik

The story of Xerox PARC.

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The Art of Deception

Kevin Mitnick explains social engineering attacks

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this is a great book, and easy to pick up and read at any chapter –  Audioillity Aug 19 '09 at 13:56

The Explosive Child:

If you are a parent this is a must-read book. It will improve your life and how you relate to your family.

If you are not a parent, it will give you an insight into what we go through. Also, it gives great pointers of how to deal with chronically inflexible children or even adults.

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The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy

by Douglas Adams

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Life, the universe, and everything

"See first, think later, then test. But always see first. Otherwise you will only see what you were expecting. Most scientists forget that." -- Wonko the Sane

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Voted up to make it 42 ;) –  Mark A. Nicolosi Nov 4 '08 at 1:46
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As the question says: "Please elaborate on why you think a given book is worth reading from a programmer's perspective." –  Ash Jan 31 '09 at 13:28
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I've read all the books in the series and really liked them but I can't think why programmers should read them. –  Annan Feb 1 '09 at 0:51
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As a developer and previously as tech support, there's one thing to learn from this book (and the entire series): DON'T PANIC!!! After that, there's also the comfort of reading about problems bigger than you own :P –  SirDemon Apr 4 '09 at 6:42
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Enjoyable, but over-rated. Most useful for understanding why your colleagues laugh at non sequiturs that involve the number 42. –  Keith Smith Jun 15 '09 at 15:15

Peopleware: Productive Projects and Teams

by Tom DeMarco and Timothy Lister

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This classic book encourages us to think about the people instead of the process. It's full of practical advice on team building, productivity and office environments. It's a must read, not just for managers, but anyone related to software development.

Get two copies, one for you and one for your manager.

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It's a great book, but be warned that if you're not in a position to make changes, it may only frustrate you to see the gap between how things ought to be and how they actually are. –  Kyralessa Apr 10 '09 at 1:11
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It's a good book but it's borderline that it's non-programming... –  Jon Hopkins Jul 28 '09 at 8:24
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it's about programmers, not at all about programming! –  Serge - appTranslator Oct 1 '09 at 19:29
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@Kyralessa But if you never see that gap, then you perhaps never will be in such a position. –  Brian Ortiz Nov 1 '09 at 19:13

The Hitchhikers Guide to the Galaxy. Best book I ever read.

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Duplicate. Look near the top of the list. ;) –  Andrei Krotkov Jan 16 '09 at 16:11

Pragmatic Thinking and Learning: Refactor Your Wetware

by Andy Hunt

It covers what's going on in your head while programming and learning, and states that this process is more important than what goes on in your IDE. Andy Hunt is also the writer of "The Pragmatic Programmer"

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Facts and Fallacies of Software Engineering

by Robert L. Glass

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See Jeff Atwood's post about this: codinghorror.com/blog/archives/001083.html. Hmm, is this really a non-programming book, by the way? –  Jonik Apr 9 '09 at 19:29
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It is a non-programming with the concept that it does not have any programming methodologies or techniques, etc. But it is software related of course. –  dimitris mistriotis Jun 6 '09 at 21:54

Brain Rules

by John Medina

This book explores, in a surprisingly concise and entertaining manner, how our brains work and how to make them work better. Medina is a master of practicing what he preaches and has produced a work that everyone can enjoy, particularly programmers and geeks. What makes this book particularly interesting is the holistic approach to delivery of the content. There is a fascinating website to compliment the book as well as an included film on DVD. There is also an audio book narrated by the author and a blog.

This is definitely a book I think all programmers - actually, everyone - should read. I reckon it could be the catalyst for some cool exercising while you work innovations.

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Tolstoy's War and Peace. It's an immense (and immensely awesome) classic work of literature. Reading it and re-reading it, analyzing it time and again--all this will help you start thinking in terms of understanding instead of knowing, something we could all benefit from as developers.

EDIT

I recommend the Anne Dunigan (sp.?) translation especially.

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Another one from a different angle from prior posts: Gödel, Escher, Bach: an Eternal Golden Braid, by Douglas Hofstadter.

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Once I read it too, its informative in a number of ways, and enlightens us. Would definitely recommend it. But I took a long time to read it though. –  Socratees Sep 20 '08 at 17:18
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I'm half way through it and must say it is overrated. The author tends to repeat concepts too often it gets annoying. Some times I just want to yell at the author "RECURSION I GET IT" –  heeen Apr 9 '09 at 20:29
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I agree that this book is kind of overrated, especially if a lot of its concepts are already familiar to you. Maybe if you read it during the first year of college you would gain more from it than 6 years later. That said, the word play and dialogues are good fun. –  cbp Apr 10 '09 at 0:35
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Yeah I agree with some of the others who found it overrated. Having just completed a Computer Science and Philosophy degree I didn't find that many new ideas in it. Was interesting at times but just way too slow. –  David Terei Jul 2 '09 at 1:59
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Remember the part where he says you can't surprise someone reading a book with the ending since by its nature you can tell when you are reaching the end of the book. He then proposes that you could do it if you had the ending occur any where you wanted and then fill the next couple hundred pages with gibberish. I always wonder if he used this technique in this book and where does the gibberish actually start.... –  jmucchiello Aug 24 '09 at 20:36

One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest by Ken Kesey

Totally unrelated to software development, but highly entertaining. Teaches a lot about human behaviour and interaction. Might help you out if your manager's a Nurse Ratched...

The movie was good too.

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Snow Crash By Neal Stephenson

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I read that recently, on someone's recommendation. I was disappointed - it seemed rather dated. –  Ian Dickinson Oct 6 '08 at 12:37
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This book was the inspiration for this answer. –  Robert S. Apr 9 '09 at 20:06
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I read it and was very disappointed. It makes me wonder about some other books on this list since this is rated so highly. –  Joe Philllips Apr 18 '09 at 10:33
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I actually enjoy this book again and again. Not only because of those plenty moments where you recognise some of the recently hyped applications but for the style of writing as well. Obviously not all technological ideas are Stephenson's inventions, but he goes beyond known concepts, both in maturity of description as well as in technical detail. His scenery is inspirational and realistic enough to serve as example. No wonder we nowadays recognise "earth" or "second life" as being inspired by this book. And then there are the characters which one can both wonder about and identify with. –  Don Johe Jul 20 '09 at 13:51

I used to read a lot of non-technical books ... what everyone would refer to as the classics, Who Moved My Cheese, Getting Things Done, One Minute Manager and so on.

One day I finally realized that all these books were trying to do was prevent me from making mistakes ... which is exactly the opposite of how me, and most people learn. Smart people make mistakes, and fail, quite frequently, but what makes them different is that they learn from their mistakes. How could I learn when the books I was reading were preventing my from some good life lessons?

So from that point on I stopped reading non-technical books ... save for the ones that related to technical management .. which there aren't many. Instead I started reading biographies on business owners, like Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, Steve Ballmer, Larry Ellison and so on. I learned more from these brillant, crazy, egocentric, often times failures that I learned from any of the business books I previously read!

That is where I would start ... read books from people who are successes and failures in the vertical industries you are interested in ... instead of some author who is speaking from second-hand experience.

With that aside, if I had to recommend some non-technical books, I would have to say these are a couple of my classics:

  • Acres of Diamonds by Russell H. Conwell
  • Obvious Adams: The Story of a Successful Businessman by Robert R. Updegraff
  • The Art of War by Sun Tzu
  • The Book of Five Rings by Miyamoto Musashi
  • Machiavelli's The Prince by Niccolo Machiavelli
  • Bible, King James Version

Just my thoughts!

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The OP asked for one book per reply so each could be voted on separately. –  RobH Apr 9 '09 at 18:24

A little off the wall here but I would say "Pillars of the Earth" - Ken Follet.

Apart from being a gripping epic, the parallels you can draw between developing software and running a project, and the craftsmen and "managers" building a Cathedral (and the entire town) are very interesting.

(Also voted for "7 habits of highly effective people" - a classic.)

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Joel Spolsky's list is quite good http://www.joelonsoftware.com/articles/FogCreekMBACurriculum.html. My favourites are Peopleware & Mythical Man Month

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I easily think Cryptonomicon is a book everyone with a technical interest should read. It gives an intriguing look into the history of technology, cryptography and post-world-war tech development. As well as beeing filled with fantastic characters!

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There's a Cryptonomicon answer way higher-up (stackoverflow.com/questions/38210/…) - please vote that up instead. Perhaps move the commentary there too. (Yes, this one was posted earlier; it doesn't matter.) –  Jonik Jun 26 '09 at 15:17

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