Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

While working with annotations I stumbled accross the following piece of code (it's the Hibernate @NotNull annotation):

@Target(value = {ElementType.METHOD, ElementType.FIELD, ElementType.ANNOTATION_TYPE, ElementType.CONSTRUCTOR, ElementType.PARAMETER})
@Retention(value = RetentionPolicy.RUNTIME)
@Documented
@Constraint(validatedBy = {})
public @interface NotNull {

    @Target(value = {ElementType.METHOD, ElementType.FIELD, ElementType.ANNOTATION_TYPE, ElementType.CONSTRUCTOR, ElementType.PARAMETER})
    @Retention(value = RetentionPolicy.RUNTIME)
    @Documented
    public @interface List {

        public NotNull[] value();
    }

    public String message() default "{javax.validation.constraints.NotNull.message}";

    public Class<?>[] groups() default {};

    public Class<? extends Payload>[] payload() default {};
}

I was wondering about the default keyword/construct in the method definition, which I've never seen before. As I understood, it lets you define a default value for this method (or annotation property).

Now I was trying to apply this construct to a normal interface, but it failed. This would fail to compile:

public interface DefaultTest {
    public String test() default "value";
}

But this would work:

public @interface DefaultTest {
    public String test() default "value";
}

So my question is: Is the default keyword annotation-specific? And if yes, what speaks against using this construct in normal interface definitions?

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer

up vote 6 down vote accepted

It can only be used for annotations. If you want a default return value for an interface you need to use an abstract class instead.

public abstract class DefaultTest {

  public String test() {
    return "value";
  }

}

The reason they don't have default values for interfaces is because you could inherit multiple interfaces and what would happen if each interface had a different default value?

share|improve this answer
1  
The multiple interface inheritance makes perfect sense. Thanks for pointing this out. –  MicSim Sep 29 '10 at 15:54
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.