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I'd like avoid loop

I have this :

string s = "AAAA,12,BBBB,34,CCCCC,56";

With Linq, I'd like to have 2 List

In the first : AAAA, BBBB and CCCCC

In the second : 12,34 and 56

It's not based on numeric or not numeric.

Thanks,

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1  
What is the partitioning of the string based on? Position in the list, number of characters, etc.? –  Dave M Sep 29 '10 at 12:10
    
Yes it's position in the list –  Kris-I Sep 29 '10 at 12:12
2  
I'd like avoid loop You do realise that whatever LINQ solution you decide on will in fact, use at least one loop? –  Winston Smith Sep 29 '10 at 12:29
    
@Winston Smith: The Linq solution could use recursive functions calls instead of a loop. But I guess Kris' point might have been that he was looking for a declarative solution instead of an imperative one. (Even if it's ultimately compiled to imperative assembler code.) –  nikie Sep 29 '10 at 12:58
    
Did my answer help you? –  BrunoLM Oct 7 '10 at 12:53

9 Answers 9

up vote 28 down vote accepted

You can use

var str = "AAAA,12,BBBB,34,CCCCC,56";

var spl = str.Split(',');
var l1 = spl.Where((x, y) => y % 2 == 0).ToList();
var l2 = spl.Where((x, y) => y % 2 == 1).ToList();

This is going to check if the index is even or odd.

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Lets use Aggregate for the fun of it (and also, to prove this can be done as a single expression):

"AAAA,12,BBBB,34,CCCC,56".Split(',').Aggregate(
    new { Uneven = new List<string>(), Even = new List<string>() },
    (seed, s) => { 
        if (seed.Uneven.Count > seed.Even.Count) 
            seed.Even.Add(s);
        else
            seed.Uneven.Add(s);
        return seed;
    });

According to LINQPad, the result is this: alt text

Of course I probably wouldn't do it this way, as it's kind of hard to read. And the testing for which list to append to is, well, not nice.

But at least we now have another example of lambda statements - normally the LINQ literature tries to forget them (probably because they won't work with SQL or any other backend that uses expression trees).

One advantage of this method as opposed to the cleaner solutions above is that this only makes one pass through the list. Since we are splitting a string, though, I'd try optimizing somewhere else ;) Wouldn't a IEnumerable<string> Split(this string self, string boundary) be cool?

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Eh, cool. Hardly real-world but cool. –  Dan Abramov Sep 29 '10 at 12:52
    
Somehow it seems like a strange abuse of Aggregate if the accumulator function modifies the the source parameter. It feels like following the letter of functional programming while contradicting the spirit. Am I the only one who thinks that? –  nikie Sep 29 '10 at 12:56
    
@nikie with "source parameter" do you mean TSource (not modified) or TAccumulate (modified, but isn't that always the case?) –  Daren Thomas Sep 29 '10 at 13:12
    
@gaearon, yes, this isn't really real-world, until you want to do a weighted average of a property for a list of objects. Then using Aggregate like this can shine (especially since you can add a third parameter for returning/formatting the end result). –  Daren Thomas Sep 29 '10 at 13:14
    
I meant, TAccumulate, of course. And I don't think it should be modified. For example, if I used Aggregate to calculate the sum or product of a list of numbers, the aggregateion function should just return the product or sum of it's arguments, without changing one. In this case, the "functional" solution (e.g. if you'd write it in Haskell or *ML) would probably work on linked lists and create a new linked list with a cheap Cons instruction instead of modifying its parameters. (IMO, Linq should have included a linked list type that allowed you to do just that.) –  nikie Sep 29 '10 at 13:20

Given that the rule is that you want every second string in one list and the others in another list, you can do something like this:

        string s = "AAAA,12,BBBB,34,CCCCC,56";

        var parts = s.Split(',');

        var first = parts.Where((p, i) => i % 2 == 0);
        var second = parts.Where((p, i) => i % 2 == 1);
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There is a nice tutorial here http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb397915.aspx

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I'm not sure exactly what your end goal is, but you can try this:

var strings = s.Split(',').Where( (s,p) => p % 2 == 0)
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you could group on the position and the extrat you lists from the group, like so:

        public IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> ToLists<T>(IEnumerable<T> sequence)
        {
            var res = sequence.Select((item, position) => new { Item = item, Position = position })
                              .GroupBy(pair => pair.Position % 2 == 0,pair => pair.Item);
            return from grouping in res
                   select grouping;
        }

If you want the Lists to be of different types you can iterate through the result. Which is why the return type is not IEnumerable> but IEnumerable>. using ToList will iterate the sequence but if you want to perform some action on each element you might as well merge those actions, make one iteration through the sequnce superflourious

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Here is the isnumeric and not numeric filter for those interested... i realise its not needed

 string x =  "AAAA,12,BBBB,34,CCCCC,56";

Regex  _isNumber = new Regex(@"^\d+$");

string[] y = x.Split(',') .Where(a => _isNumber.IsMatch(a)).ToArray();
string[] z  =x.Split(',') .Where(a => !_isNumber.IsMatch(a)).ToArray();
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If the list is not ordered with every second being a number you could do something like this

var stringList = "AAAA,12,BBBB,34,CCCCC,56".Split(',');

var intsAsStrings = stringList.Where(
        (x) =>
        {
            int i;
            return int.TryParse(x, out i);
        }).ToList();

var strings = stringList.Where(x => !intsAsStrings.Contains(x)).ToList();
share|improve this answer
    
Why not simply use Except instead of that Where(x => !intsAsStrings.Contains(x))? Also this is not what the author of the question wanted. –  sloth Sep 29 '10 at 12:26
    
Didn't know the Except method, nice. –  Xorandor Sep 29 '10 at 12:36

So much fun, without side-effects and no method calls.

"TesteDessaBudega".Aggregate(new List<List<char>>(), 
(l, c) => char.IsUpper(c) ? 
    l.Union(
        new List<List<char>>(){
            new List<char>(){c}
        }
    ).ToList() : 
    l.Take(l.Count - 1).Union(
        new List<List<char>>(){
            l.Last().Union(
                new List<char>(){c}
            ).ToList()
        }
    ).ToList() 
)

Oh, on vbnet just for more fun.

"TesteDessaBudega".Aggregate(New List(Of List(Of Char))(), 
Function(l, c) If(Char.IsUpper(c),
    l.Union(
        New List(Of List(Of Char))(New List(Of Char)(){
            New List(Of Char)(New Char(){c})
        })
    ).ToList(),
    l.Take(l.Count - 1).Union(
        New List(Of List(Of Char))(New List(Of Char)(){
            l.Last().Union(
                New List(Of Char)(New Char(){c})
            ).ToList()
        })
    ).ToList() 
))

linqresult

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1  
Really unsure how this has any relevance to the question. I have a feeling you are answering a different question. –  btlog Aug 16 '13 at 3:48

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