Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

At first - Im sql newbie, sorry for this (mbe typicall) question.

I Have two table: table of organisations...

id_org    org_name
1         Organiz1
2         Organiz2

and table of organization staff.

id_staff  staff_name   id_org
1         John         1
2         Jack         1
3         Sally        1
4         Peter        1
5         Andy         2
6         Joe          2

I want sql answer(two rows) like this

1 Organiz1 1 John 2 Jack 3 Sally 4 Peter
2 Organiz2 5 Andy 6 Joe

and I want what each name or id of staff will be named as staff_1_name(staff_2_name,staff_3_name) and staff_1_id. How I can get it?

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted
 SELECT o.id_org, o.org_name, GROUP_CONCAT(concat(s.id_staff, ' ', s.staff_name) ORDER BY s.id_staff SEPARATOR ' ')
 FROM Organizations o, staff s
 WHERE s.id_org = o.id_org
 GROUP BY id_org, org_name;
share|improve this answer
    
Good answer, but string concatenation in MySQL won't work with the + operator. You'll have to use CONCAT(). – Daniel Vassallo Sep 29 '10 at 13:11
    
@Daniel, thanks. Replaced to concat. (Its nightmare, oracle use '||', sql-server - '+', mysql - concat) – Michael Pakhantsov Sep 29 '10 at 13:14
    
I agree... Especially for such a basic operation. – Daniel Vassallo Sep 29 '10 at 13:15

You're in luck. MySQL offers a handy function called GROUP_CONCAT() which you can use to build that result set:

SELECT o.id_org, o.org_name, GROUP_CONCAT(s.staff_name_id SEPARATOR ' ')
FROM   organisations o
JOIN   (
          SELECT id_staff, 
                 id_org,
                 CONCAT(id_staff, ' ', staff_name) staff_name_id 
          FROM staff
       ) s ON (s.id_org = o.id_org)
GROUP BY o.id_org, o.org_name;

Test case:

CREATE TABLE organisations (id_org int, org_name varchar(20));
CREATE TABLE staff (id_staff int, staff_name varchar(20), id_org int);

INSERT INTO organisations VALUES (1, 'Organiz1');
INSERT INTO organisations VALUES (2, 'Organiz2');

INSERT INTO staff VALUES (1, 'John',  1);
INSERT INTO staff VALUES (2, 'Jack',  1);
INSERT INTO staff VALUES (3, 'Sally', 1);
INSERT INTO staff VALUES (4, 'Peter', 1);
INSERT INTO staff VALUES (5, 'Andy',  2);
INSERT INTO staff VALUES (6, 'Joe',   2);

Result:

+--------+----------+---------------------------------------------+
| id_org | org_name | GROUP_CONCAT(s.staff_name_id SEPARATOR ' ') |
+--------+----------+---------------------------------------------+
|      1 | Organiz1 | 1 John 2 Jack 3 Sally 4 Peter               |
|      2 | Organiz2 | 5 Andy 6 Joe                                |
+--------+----------+---------------------------------------------+
2 rows in set (0.00 sec)

UPDATE:

@Micahel's solution also returns the same result. I recommend using that solution since you can concatenate your fields directly in the GROUP_CONCAT() function, instead of using a derived table:

SELECT    o.id_org, 
          o.org_name, 
          GROUP_CONCAT(CONCAT(id_staff, ' ', staff_name) SEPARATOR ' ')
FROM      organisations o
JOIN      staff s ON (s.id_org = o.id_org)
GROUP BY  o.id_org, o.org_name;
share|improve this answer
    
big thanks to you answer. but I want to declare their names as fields (staff_1_name ...) It is possible? – 0dd_b1t Sep 29 '10 at 13:29
1  
@0dd_b1t: Oh I see. MySQL doesn't support Pivot Tables (which is what you're looking for). There are some workarounds, but pretty complex. You may want to search on Stack Overflow or Google for MySQL Pivot tables... That is unless you require a maximum number of users. In that case, you could solve the problem quite easily, using a join for each level of depth. – Daniel Vassallo Sep 29 '10 at 13:41
    
thx to you, and thx for this big answer and answers:) But (you need to understand me) i marked michael answer as best. – 0dd_b1t Sep 29 '10 at 14:24

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.