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I am trying to create a linked list just to see if I can, and I am having trouble getting my head around it. Does anyone have an example of a very simple implementation of Linked list using C#? All the examples I have found so far are quite overdone.

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8 Answers 8

up vote 27 down vote accepted

A Linked List, at its core is a bunch of Nodes linked together.

So, you need to start with a simple Node class:

public class Node {
    public Node next;
    public Object data;
}

Then your linked list will have as a member one node representing the head (start) of the list:

public class LinkedList {
    private Node head;
}

Then you need to add functionality to the list by adding methods. They usually involve some sort of traversal along all of the nodes.

public void printAllNodes() {
    Node cur = head;
    while (cur.next != null) 
    {
        Console.WriteLine(cur.data);
        cur = cur.next;
    }
}

Also, inserting new data is another common operation:

public void Add(Object data) {
    Node toAdd = new Node();
    toAdd.data = data;
    Node current = head;
    // traverse all nodes (see the print all nodes method for an example)
    current.Next = toAdd;
}

This should provide a good starting point.

share|improve this answer
    
@Justin are you sure it is clear for a beginner what you mean by "traverse all nodes"? –  InsertNickHere Sep 29 '10 at 17:54
1  
@insertNick, well I used that term when I introduced the PrintAllNodes method. But it may be slightly confusing –  jjnguy Sep 29 '10 at 17:57
1  
isnt the head always null? is it meant to be like that? –  Shane Sep 30 '10 at 8:31
    
@shane, well, in this example yes. You will have to have some special cases for adding to an empty list. –  jjnguy Sep 30 '10 at 12:32
    
I was wondering why it would be necessary to have two classes, one for node and one for LinkedList? Why can't I declare the node inside the LinkedList class? –  Kala J May 20 at 14:06

Based on what @jjnguy said, and fixing the bug in his PrintAllNodes(), here's the full Console App example:

public class Node
{
    public Node next;
    public Object data;
}

public class LinkedList
{
    private Node head;

    public void printAllNodes()
    {
        Node current = head;
        while (current != null)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(current.data);
            current = current.next;
        }
    }

    public void AddFirst(Object data)
    {
        Node toAdd = new Node();

        toAdd.data = data;
        toAdd.next = head;

        head = toAdd;
    }

    public void AddLast(Object data)
    {
        if (head == null)
        {
            head = new Node();

            head.data = data;
            head.next = null;
        }
        else
        {
            Node toAdd = new Node();
            toAdd.data = data;

            Node current = head;
            while (current.next != null)
            {
                current = current.next;
            }

            current.next = toAdd;
        }
    }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Add First:");
        LinkedList myList1 = new LinkedList();

        myList1.AddFirst("Hello");
        myList1.AddFirst("Magical");
        myList1.AddFirst("World");
        myList1.printAllNodes();

        Console.WriteLine();

        Console.WriteLine("Add Last:");
        LinkedList myList2 = new LinkedList();

        myList2.AddLast("Hello");
        myList2.AddLast("Magical");
        myList2.AddLast("World");
        myList2.printAllNodes();

        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}
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I am a beginner and this helped me:

class List
{
    private Element Root;
}

First you create the class List which will contain all the methods. Then you create the Node-Class, I will call it Element

class Element
{
    public int Value;
    public Element Next;
}

Then you can start adding methods to your List class. Here is a 'add' method for example.

public void Add(int value)
{
    Element newElement = new Element();
    newElement.Value = Value;

    Element rootCopy = Root;
    Root = newElement;
    newElement.Next = rootCopy;

    Console.WriteLine(newElement.Value);
}
share|improve this answer

This one is nice:

  namespace ConsoleApplication1
    {

    // T is the type of data stored in a particular instance of GenericList.
    public class GenericList<T>
    {
        private class Node
        {
            // Each node has a reference to the next node in the list.
            public Node Next;
            // Each node holds a value of type T.
            public T Data;
        }

        // The list is initially empty.
        private Node head = null;

        // Add a node at the beginning of the list with t as its data value.
        public void AddNode(T t)
        {
            Node newNode = new Node();
            newNode.Next = head;
            newNode.Data = t;
            head = newNode;
        }

        // The following method returns the data value stored in the last node in
        // the list. If the list is empty, the default value for type T is
        // returned.
        public T GetFirstAdded()
        {
            // The value of temp is returned as the value of the method. 
            // The following declaration initializes temp to the appropriate 
            // default value for type T. The default value is returned if the 
            // list is empty.
            T temp = default(T);

            Node current = head;
            while (current != null)
            {
                temp = current.Data;
                current = current.Next;
            }
            return temp;
        }
    }
}

Test code:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    // Test with a non-empty list of integers.
    GenericList<int> gll = new GenericList<int>();
    gll.AddNode(5);
    gll.AddNode(4);
    gll.AddNode(3);
    int intVal = gll.GetFirstAdded();
    // The following line displays 5.
    System.Console.WriteLine(intVal);
}

I encountered it on msdn here

share|improve this answer
    
Nice example... but why not GetHead()? –  codekaizen Sep 29 '10 at 16:46
    
@codekaizen Yes good point, I renamed it to GetFirstAdded –  nan Sep 29 '10 at 16:52
    
I think you went a little wrong there I think the The "GetLast" was Method was correct –  Shane Sep 29 '10 at 16:59
    
@A. Nosal - @Shane seems correct. You were right; the rename is not quite right. I was just thinking to add a new method for getting the list head. –  codekaizen Sep 29 '10 at 17:18

A simple Google search yielded this article:

http://www.functionx.com/csharp1/examples/linkedlist.htm

looks pretty simple on first glance...

Also, when you're ready for the next level, use reflector to examine Microsoft's own LinkedList

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public class Node
{
    private Object data;

    public Node next {get;set;}

    public Node(Object data)
    {
    this.data = data;
     }

}

 public class Linkedlist
  {
    Node head;

    public void Add(Node n) 
    {
    n.Next = this.Head;
    this.Head = n;
    }
 }

using:

LinkedList sample = new LinkedList();
sample.add(new Node("first"));
sample.Add(new Node("second"))
share|improve this answer
    
I write this in notepad but should work. Very easy example. –  ka-ja May 15 '13 at 7:59
    
Thanks for the example. Could you perhaps include comments which describe what each line of code is doing? –  CaitlinG Aug 1 '13 at 5:39
public class DynamicLinkedList
{

    private class Node
    {
        private object element;
        private Node next;

        public object Element
        {
            get { return this.element; }
            set { this.element = value; }
        }

        public Node Next
        {
            get { return this.next; }
            set { this.next = value; }
        }

        public Node(object element, Node prevNode)
        {
            this.element = element;
            prevNode.next = this;
        }

        public Node(object element)
        {
            this.element = element;
            next = null;
        }
    }

    private Node head;
    private Node tail;
    private int count;

    public DynamicLinkedList()
    {
        this.head = null;
        this.tail = null;
        this.count = 0;
    }

    public void AddAtLastPosition(object element)
    {
        if (head == null)
        {
            head = new Node(element);
            tail = head;
        }
        else
        {
            Node newNode = new Node(element, tail);
            tail = newNode;
        }

        count++;
    }

    public object GetLastElement()
    {
        object lastElement = null;
        Node currentNode = head;

        while (currentNode != null)
        {
            lastElement = currentNode.Element;
            currentNode = currentNode.Next;
        }

        return lastElement;
    }

}

Testing with:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    DynamicLinkedList list = new DynamicLinkedList();
    list.AddAtLastPosition(1);
    list.AddAtLastPosition(2);
    list.AddAtLastPosition(3);
    list.AddAtLastPosition(4);
    list.AddAtLastPosition(5);

    object lastElement = list.GetLastElement();
    Console.WriteLine(lastElement);
}
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