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I need to draw something like a subway map (multiple routes along the same path) using PHP's image library. Here's an example:

  *********
  ******** *
  ******* * *
         * * *
          * * *
          * * *
          * * *
          * * *                      
          * * *                      
          * * *                      
           * * *                     
            * * *                    
             * * *                   
              * * ********************
               * *********************
                **********************

It's easy enough to draw one line along this path. I don't know how to draw multiple lines that follow the path but have an equal amount of space between them.

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2 Answers 2

For a given point A, and more lines through it, for the first points you'll have to decide whether points go 'inside'(B) the track, or 'outside'(C):

  ********C
  D******A *
  Q*****B * *
         * * *
          * E *

Now, you can calculate the offset of your point B to point A as a path from with length=offset (5px for instance) along the angle the which is half the clockwise angle between AE & AD for the 'inside' B (or the clockwise angle from AD to AE for the 'outside' C, or just use a negative offset later on). You'll want point B on a distance of 5px from A along the line through A with an angle angle AE + ((angle AD - angle AE) / 2)

I'm by no means a Math wiz, and the only time I needed to calculate angles like those were in javascript, I'll give it as an example, rewrite to PHP as you please (anybody who does know math, feel free to laugh & correct when needed):

var dx = b.x - a.x;
var dy = b.y - a.y;
if(dx == 0 && dy == 0){
    answer = 0;
} else if(dx > 0 && dy >= 0 ){
    answer = Math.atan(dy/dx);
} else if(dx <= 0 && dy > 0){
    answer = Math.atan(dx/dy) + (Math.PI * 0.5);
} else if(dx <= 0 && dy <= 0){
    answer = Math.atan(dy/dx) + Math.PI;
} else if(dx >= 0 && dy <= 0){
    answer = Math.atan(dy/dx) + (Math.PI * 1.5);
}

So, in a grid where D=(0,10),A=(10,10), E=(20,20):

  • The angle through AE = 45° (PI/4 rad),through AD = 180° (PI rad)
  • The angle through AB is then (45 + ((180-45)/2))=> 112.5° (5/8 PI rad)
  • 5px offset from A=(10,10) through angle 112.5° gives you this location for B:
    • Bx = Ax + (cos(angle) * 5) = +/- 8.1
    • By = Ay + (sin(angle) * 5) = +/- 14.6
  • At the 'sibling' point Q next to starting point D you have no previous path to reference / calculate an angle from, so I'd take the perpendicular: angle DQ = angle DA + 90° (PI/2 rad) (in the example you could just do Dy+5, but maybe you don't always start parallel to one of the 2 axis)
  • Rinse and repeat for all other points, draw lines between the calculated coordinates.
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Determining which side a point lies is easier done with cross product. Here's and example: stackoverflow.com/questions/3461453/… –  LearnCocos2D Jul 15 '12 at 13:39
    
@LearnCocos2D: erm.. this was a while ago (2 years nearly) but: where in this problem do you think we need to 'determine at which side' a point lays? We are not comparing the points here, we are actually making them... Making the point 'inside'/'right' or 'outside'/'left' is (1) relative to the previous line here but more importantly (2) a choice / user-decision made once in the beginning, and just the difference of using a positive (+) or negative (-) offset (in this example, 5px or -5px). Or am I missing something completely? –  Wrikken Jul 15 '12 at 15:00
    
I do appreciate the link to the cross product BTW, reading up on it now, but I genuinely struggle to see it's relevance to the problem at hand, how does this help calculating the coords of point B? –  Wrikken Jul 15 '12 at 15:03
    
I was referring to this quote: "for the first points you'll have to decide whether points go 'inside'(B) the track, or 'outside'©" I thought that's what you intended to do, determine the side where the points go. So I searched for that and found the line-side post. I assumed it does the same thing all the atan calculation did. That part seemed somewhat standalone and detached from the rest of the description, I wasn't even sure what it does really. For example, what information does the "answer" variable hold? –  LearnCocos2D Jul 15 '12 at 19:05
    
The magic word is decide there: the OP wants to draw a series of parallel lines / vectors next to an already existing set (A). The coords of the existing set are known, those of the new parallel set have to be calculated. The only user decision is to decide whether the path should be the one through B or through C, the rest is just calculations. The answer in the js-match portion there is the angle in radians given 2 known coords, where order of the coords matter (i.e. a line through from (1,1) to (2,2) is another one then from (2,2) to (1,1). –  Wrikken Jul 15 '12 at 19:26

To complement Wrikken's answer, here's an actual code sample using Objective-C and the cocos2d-iphone engine reconstructed from this thread and others. The atan is not needed, instead the cross product is used, see the C function at the end of the code sample and this link.

I also simply switched the sign of the offset vector from A to B in order to get the vector from A to C. This avoids calling cosf/sinf twice.

PS: This code runs in a for loop from i = 0 to i < numVertices.

CGPoint splinePoint = splinePoints[i];

CGPoint prevPoint = (i == 0) ? splinePoint : splinePoints[i - 1];
CGPoint railPoint = splinePoint;
CGPoint nextPoint = (i == (numVertices-1)) ? splinePoint : splinePoints[i + 1];

CGPoint toPrevPoint = ccpSub(railPoint, prevPoint);
CGPoint toNextPoint = ccpSub(railPoint, nextPoint);
float angleToPrevPoint = ccpAngleSigned(kAngleOriginVector, toPrevPoint);
float angleToNextPoint = ccpAngleSigned(kAngleOriginVector, toNextPoint);
float offsetAngle = 0.0f;

if (i > 0 && i < (numVertices - 1))
{
    offsetAngle = angleToNextPoint + ((angleToPrevPoint-angleToNextPoint) / 2);
}
else if (i == 0)
{
    offsetAngle = angleToNextPoint + M_PI_2;
}
else
{
    offsetAngle = angleToPrevPoint + M_PI_2;
}

CGPoint offsetLeftRail, offsetRightRail, offsetRail;
offsetRail.x = cosf(offsetAngle) * railOffsetFromCenter;
offsetRail.y = sinf(offsetAngle) * railOffsetFromCenter;
offsetLeftRail = ccpAdd(railPoint, offsetRail);
offsetRightRail = ccpAdd(railPoint, ccpMult(offsetRail, -1.0f));

if (isPointToTheLeftOfLine(prevPoint, railPoint, offsetLeftRail))
{
    leftRailSplinePoints[i] = offsetLeftRail;
    rightRailSplinePoints[i] = offsetRightRail;
}
else
{
    leftRailSplinePoints[i] = offsetRightRail;
    rightRailSplinePoints[i] = offsetLeftRail;
}

BOOL isPointToTheLeftOfLine(CGPoint start, CGPoint end, CGPoint test)
{
    return ((end.x - start.x) * (test.y - start.y) -
            (end.y - start.y) * (test.x - start.x)) > 0;
}

This helped me to draw the rails on the railtrack:

enter image description here

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what's railOffsetFromCenter ? –  programmer Feb 23 '13 at 12:46

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