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I was just simply wondering how I could limit the length of a string in C#.

string foo = "1234567890";

Say we have that. How can I limit foo to say, 5 characters?

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2  
Could you provide a bit more context? Where do you want to do this? In the simplest case, just do if (foo.Length > 5) { throw new Lemmons.StringTooLongException(); } –  Michael Petrotta Sep 29 '10 at 21:27
    
Read this response: stackoverflow.com/questions/2776673/… –  raist Jan 22 '13 at 9:31
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7 Answers 7

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Strings in C# are immutable and in some sense it means that they are fixed-size.
However you cannot constrain a string variable to only accept n-character strings. If you define a string variable, it can be assigned any string. If truncating strings (or throwing errors) is essential part of your business logic, consider doing so in your specific class' property setters (that's what Jon suggested, and it's the most natural way of creating constraints on values in .NET).

If you just want to make sure isn't too long (e.g. when passing it as a parameter to some legacy code), truncate it manually:

const int MaxLength = 5;


var name = "Christopher";
if (name.Length > MaxLength)
    name = name.Substring(0, MaxLength); // name = "Chris"
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2  
I would say that all strings are fixed length in .NET. But you can't declare that a variable can only accept strings of a certain length. –  Jon Skeet Sep 29 '10 at 21:33
    
Yeah, that's right. I'll edit my reply, thanks. –  Dan Sep 29 '10 at 21:33
    
Yay, it worked. Thanks :D –  Lemmons Sep 29 '10 at 21:42
    
Wouldn't that create an error if there's a surrogate pair at the end of the string, with low surrogate being cut off? –  golergka Aug 5 '13 at 8:12
    
I would be pretty surprised if C# was intelligent enough to pick the right letters to truncate "Jonathan" to "John". Most languages would probably just give you "Jona"... –  Carl Walsh Aug 23 '13 at 22:14
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You can't. Bear in mind that foo is a variable of type string.

You could create your own type, say BoundedString, and have:

BoundedString foo = new BoundedString(5);
foo.Text = "hello"; // Fine
foo.Text = "naughty"; // Throw an exception or perhaps truncate the string

... but you can't stop a string variable from being set to any string reference (or null).

Of course, if you've got a string property, you could do that:

private string foo;
public string Foo
{
    get { return foo; }
    set
    {
        if (value.Length > 5)
        {
            throw new ArgumentException("value");
        }
        foo = value;
    }
}

Does that help you in whatever your bigger context is?

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1  
Can I make a character array that is limited. Like in C/C++? For example: char blah[100]; –  Lemmons Sep 29 '10 at 21:30
4  
Sure char[] blah = new char[100];. Should you? No. Use strings and enforce size constraints with a wrapper class or a strictly defined interface (preferably the latter). –  Ron Warholic Sep 29 '10 at 21:31
    
That BoundedString seems like a nice candidate for an implicit conversion operator from string to BoundedString. –  JulianR Sep 29 '10 at 22:53
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You could extend the "string" class to let you return a limited string.

using System;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
   class Program
   {
      static void Main(string[] args)
      {
         // since specified strings are treated on the fly as string objects...
         string limit5 = "The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dog.".LimitLength(5);
         string limit10 = "The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dog.".LimitLength(10);
         // this line should return us the entire contents of the test string
         string limit100 = "The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dog.".LimitLength(100);

         Console.WriteLine("limit5   - {0}", limit5);
         Console.WriteLine("limit10  - {0}", limit10);
         Console.WriteLine("limit100 - {0}", limit100);

         Console.ReadLine();
      }
   }

   public static class StringExtensions
   {
      /// <summary>
      /// Method that limits the length of text to a defined length.
      /// </summary>
      /// <param name="source">The source text.</param>
      /// <param name="maxLength">The maximum limit of the string to return.</param>
      public static string LimitLength(this string source, int maxLength)
      {
         if (source.Length <= maxLength)
         {
            return source;
         }

         return source.Substring(0, maxLength);
      }
   }
}

Result:

limit5 - The q
limit10 - The quick
limit100 - The quick brown fox jumped over the lazy dog.

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1  
I don't understand, why do you bother with the check. Couldn't you just do return source.Substring(0, maxLength);? Am I missing something? –  Donny V. Jan 19 '12 at 2:57
2  
@DonnyV. - Substring will throw an exception if either parameter is outside the bounds of the string. –  Mike Christensen Aug 5 '12 at 4:14
    
Can't believe I didn't see that....gotcha –  Donny V. Aug 6 '12 at 14:12
1  
This will fail when maxLength is a negative value (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aka44szs.aspx) or source is null –  o3o Aug 22 '13 at 9:16
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If this is in a class property you could do it in the setter:

public class FooClass
{
   private string foo;
   public string Foo
   {
     get { return foo; }
     set
     {
       if(!string.IsNullOrEmpty(value) && value.Length>5)
       {
            foo=value.Substring(0,5);
       }
       else
            foo=value;
     }
   }
}
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string shortFoo = foo.Length > 5 ? foo.Substring(0, 5) : foo;

Note that you can't just use foo.Substring(0, 5) by itself because it will throw an error when foo is less than 5 characters.

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The only reason I can see the purpose in this is for DB storage. If so, why not let the DB handle it and then push the exception upstream to be dealt with at the presentation layer?

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Sql Server silently truncates them, so I am thinking about building my own class just for this purpose. stackoverflow.com/questions/4628140/… –  Leonid Jun 20 '12 at 3:15
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foo = foo.Substring(0,5);

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