Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a HashMap relating Keys to Strings, and I need to compare some of the Strings against each other. However, some of the Strings may or may not be in the HashMap.

Example: Let's say I have 4 Strings that I plan to compare to each other if possible, but only 3 of them end up in the HashMap. How can I compare the Strings that are present without trying to compare them to the String that isn't, and without doing a bunch of nested ifs and elses?

edit: Alohci's solution was easy and fast, and it worked.

share|improve this question
    
So you want to compare values stored in a HashMap? Are you comparing all the values stored, or just some of them? What do you want to compare them to? Each other? Some other map? Constants? What are you looking for? Pairs? Unique values? Certain specific values? –  Rolf Rander Dec 20 '08 at 0:17
    
All of the values in the hash map should be compared to each other, and they all need to be equal (throw an error if they aren't). –  Blue Dec 20 '08 at 1:53
    
If all the values in the map are forced to be equal, what's the point of the map? –  Lawrence Dol Dec 20 '08 at 7:01
    
The unique keys still need to correspond to each value because if there is a miscompare I want to be able to see where. –  Blue Dec 22 '08 at 17:14
    
I also need the keys so that I can display helpful error messages to other people that use my program. –  Blue Dec 22 '08 at 17:29
add comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Loop through the .values collection of the HashMap Store the first entry. Compare each remaining entry with the stored one. As soon as you find one that doesn't match, throw your error. If you reach the end of the loop then all the strings match.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I should have thought of that earlier. –  Blue Dec 20 '08 at 2:06
    
Good way to get all the values stored in a HashMap collection in a list rather than iterating through a keyset. –  Tushu Dec 20 '08 at 4:01
add comment

It sounds like you need a reverse mapping, that maps all the values to their set of keys.

Map<Key,Value> forwardMap;
Map<Value, Set<Key> reverseMap;

You can then see if all of the entries you are looking at are in the set. Make sure that you put the reverse mapping in when you add/remove the forward mapping.

The benefit of this approach, is the test will be O(n) where n is the size of the keys you are testing, and not O(m) where m is the size of the forward map.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.