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Coming from a C++ background, I'm used to sticking the const keyword into function definitions to make objects being passed in read-only values. However, I've found out that this is not possible in C# (please correct me if I'm wrong). After some Googling, I arrived at the conclusion that the only way to make a read-only object is to write an interface that only has 'get' properties and pass that in instead. Elegant, I must say.

public interface IFoo
{
  IMyValInterface MyVal{ get; }
}

public class Foo : IFoo
{
  private ConcreteMyVal _myVal;

  public IMyValInterface MyVal
  {
    get { return _myVal; }
  }
}

I would pass it into:

public void SomeFunction(IFoo fooVar)
{
  // Cannot modify fooVar, Excellent!!
}

This is fine. However, in the rest of my code, I would like to modify my object normally. Adding a 'set' property to the interface would break my read-only restriction. I can add a 'set' property to Foo (and not IFoo), but the signature expects an interface rather than a concrete object. I would have to do some casting.

// Add this to class Foo. Might assign null if cast fails??
set { _myVal = value as ConcreteMyVal; }

// Somewhere else in the code...
IFoo myFoo = new Foo;
(myFoo as Foo).MyFoo = new ConcreteMyVal();

Is there a more elegant way of replicating const or making read-only function parameters without adding another property or a function?

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2  
Just to comment on your first sentence: that is not what "const" does. The referent is still mutable. Consider for example a method that takes two references to a type C, one marked const, one not. Pass a reference to the same variable for both references. If you mutate the non-const reference then the const reference will observe the mutation. const does not provide a guarantee of read-onlyness that you can rely upon. Nor does it prevent mutation of a mutable object, since it can be cast away. That is very different from readonly fields in C#. –  Eric Lippert Sep 29 '10 at 23:28
2  
To address your actual question: this is a confusing question. You seem to be saying that you want both (1) a guarantee of read-only-ness and (2) the ability to mutate the object. Those are opposites. You can't have both of them. Can you explain why you want SomeFunction to not be able to induce a mutation? Is this for security purposes? Is it for correctness? Who is providing the implementation of SomeFunction? If it's you, then why do you need it to be const? If you don't want to write a mutation, then don't. If it is someone else, then why do you care if they induce a mutation? –  Eric Lippert Sep 29 '10 at 23:34
3  
@Eric: It makes sense to limit the capabilities of SomeFunction even if I am the one writing it. It increases compile-time checking to validate against accidental mistakes. (I’m sure you’ve made mistakes before — can you not imagine yourself making this kind of mistake where you accidentally mutate a variable when you weren’t supposed to?) I think the question asker doesn’t want a guarantee of read-only-ness, he only wants a semi-guarantee that this method won’t mutate this object when accessing it through the parameter. –  Timwi Sep 29 '10 at 23:46
2  
@Eric I think the idea here is compile-time bug finding, rather than security. I know that C# implements all the "traditional" ways to do this, but doesn't seem to be very receptive of the more recent approaches - like the ones being researched in Spec#. –  romkyns Sep 30 '10 at 9:11
1  
@Timwi: I'm attempting to determine the situation actually faced by the original poster. The OP states that the client should have read-only access to the data but not the consequences for failure of that policy. If the consequences of a hostile, fully-trusted client subverting the system to write the data are bad for the business model of the service provider then trivially wrapping a read-only wrapper around the data is insufficient. I'm not making any statement about the design of the access modifiers and their interaction with reflection and code access security in the CLR. –  Eric Lippert Sep 30 '10 at 12:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I think you may be looking for a solution involving two interfaces in which one inherits from the other:

public interface IReadableFoo
{
    IMyValInterface MyVal { get; }
}

public interface IWritableFoo : IReadableFoo
{
    IMyValInterface MyVal { set; }
}

public class Foo : IWritableFoo 
{
    private ConcreteMyVal _myVal;

    public IMyValInterface MyVal
    {
        get { return _myVal; }
        set { _myVal = value as ConcreteMyVal; }
    }
}

Then you can declare methods whose parameter type “tells” whether it plans on changing the variable or not:

public void SomeFunction(IReadableFoo fooVar)
{
    // Cannot modify fooVar, excellent!
}

public void SomeOtherFunction(IWritableFoo fooVar)
{
    // Can modify fooVar, take care!
}

This mimics compile-time checks similar to constness in C++. As Eric Lippert correctly pointed out, this is not the same as immutability. But as a C++ programmer I think you know that.

By the way, you can achieve slightly better compile-time checking if you declare the type of the property in the class as ConcreteMyVal and implement the interface properties separately:

public class Foo : IWritableFoo 
{
    private ConcreteMyVal _myVal;

    public ConcreteMyVal MyVal
    {
        get { return _myVal; }
        set { _myVal = value; }
    }

    public IMyValInterface IReadableFoo.MyVal { get { return MyVal; } }
    public IMyValInterface IWritableFoo.MyVal
    {
        // (or use “(ConcreteMyVal)value” if you want it to throw
        set { MyVal = value as ConcreteMyVal; }
    }
}

This way, the setter can only throw when accessed through the interface, but not when accessed through the class.

share|improve this answer
    
D'oh! That's EXACTLY what I have in my clipboard! –  Phil Gilmore Sep 29 '10 at 23:40
    
This is a good solution. This is the same as creating two separate properties, one for set and one for get. Am I correct in assuming that for IWritableFoo.MyVal, I can use a concrete return type rather than an interface (so that I won't have to cast)?? –  MarkP Sep 29 '10 at 23:56
    
Example: public interface IWritable { ConcreteMyVal MyVal { get; } } –  MarkP Sep 29 '10 at 23:57
    
@user318811: Of course. Why don’t you just try it? (P.S. I assume you meant set instead of get in the last comment.) –  Timwi Sep 29 '10 at 23:58
1  
My point is that this is not actually using the type system as enforcement but rather as polite suggestion. If that's the goal then fine, you're done. But I and others are frequently in situations where polite suggestion is not enough; if the value actually needs to provide no mechanism whereby a mutation can occur via verifiable use of the type system then this is insufficient. It's the same reason why you can't just cast an array to IEnumerable<T> and return it; someone could still mutate the array. If that is the situation the OP is in then an immutable wrapper object is better. –  Eric Lippert Sep 30 '10 at 14:22

First of all, you're correct: you cannot apply const or a similar keyword to parameters in C#.

However, you can use interfaces to do something along those lines. Interfaces are special in the sense, that it makes perfect sense to make an interface that only covers a specific part of a feature set. E.g. image a stack class, which implements both IPopable and IPushable. If you access the instance via the IPopable interface, you can only remove entries from the stack. If you access the instance via the IPushable interface, you can only add entries to the stack. You can use interfaces this way to get something similar to what you're asking for.

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Consider Timwi's answer first. But as a second option, you could do this, making it more like the C CONST keyword.

Reference-type (object) parameters are IN parameters by default. But because they are references, their method side effects and property accesses are done to the object outside the method. The object doesn't have to be passed out. It has still been modified by the method.

However, a value-type (struct) parameter is also IN by default, and cannot have side effects or property modifications on the element that was passed in. Instead, it gets COPIED ON WRITE before going into the method. Any changes to it inside that method die when the method goes out of scope (the end of the method).

Do NOT change your classes to structs just to accommodate this need. It's a bad idea. But if they should be structs anyway, now you'll know.

BTW, half the programming community doesn't properly understand this concept but thinks they do (indeed, I've found inaccuracies on the matter of parameter direction in C# in several books). If you want to comment on the accuracy of my statements, please double check to make sure you know what you're talking about.

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It should be pointed out that using structs only has the effect of discarding changes to the object, which the compiler will happily allow. This means the author of the method can make changes to the object and then potentially get confused because they don’t persist. The intention of const in C++, and the interface-based solution in C#, is to send a signal that the method is not supposed to make changes and that the compiler should consider the attempt an error. –  Timwi Sep 29 '10 at 23:57
    
Not sure why you go to such pains to highlight that all parameters are "in" by default, since you can't pass a value to modify using an "out" parameter anyway... Your distinction is between classes & structs and how they behave under pass-by-value - in/out has nothing to do with it as far as I can see. Is there a reason for your emphasis? –  Dan Puzey Sep 30 '10 at 0:11
    
@Dan: I can’t speak for Phil, but I think it does make sense to point out that the statement “Any changes to it inside that method die” only applies if the parameter is not marked ref. –  Timwi Sep 30 '10 at 14:01
    
@Timwi: Agreed, but that's nothing to do with "in" or "out". You can't pass a value in through an out parameter! By value versus by reference isn't the same as an out parameter. –  Dan Puzey Sep 30 '10 at 16:05
    
@Dan: Well that’s not what the answerer meant. I believe he meant “in” (the default) as opposed to out or ref (which have to specified explicitly). You can’t pass a value in through an out parameter, but through a ref parameter you certainly can. –  Timwi Sep 30 '10 at 18:11

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