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I would like to be able to do something like

#print "C Preprocessor got here!"

for debugging purposes. What's the best / most portable way to do this?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 28 down vote accepted

The warning directive is probably the closest you'll get, but it's not entirely platform-independent:

#warning "C Preprocessor got here!"

AFAIK this works on most compilers except MSVC, on which you'll have to use a pragma directive:

#pragma message ( "C Preprocessor got here!" )
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2  
Which begs the question, can you put a directive based on a compilation flag to swap "pragma message" and "warning" somehow? For example, something like: #ifdef _LINUX #define #preprocmsg "#warning" else #define #preprocmsg "#pragma message"... I'll have to try that but instinct tells me the answer is no. –  Bryan Sep 30 '10 at 0:41
3  
@Bryan: Yes. #define WARNING(msg) _Pragma("message " #msg) –  Matt Joiner Mar 2 '11 at 7:31

The following are supported by MSVC, and GCC.

#pragma message("stuff")
#pragma message "stuff"

Clang has begun adding support recently, see here for more.

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Just for the record, Solaris Studio 12.3 (Sun C 5.12) does not support this pragma. –  maxschlepzig May 28 '13 at 13:06

You might want to try: #pragma message("Hello World!")

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Most C compilers will recognize a #warning directive, so

 #warning "Got here"

There's also the standard '#error' directive,

 #error "Got here"

While all compilers support that, it'll also stop the compilation/preprocessing.

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You can't. Preprocessors are processed before the C code. There are no preprocessor directives to print to the screen, because preprocessor code isn't executed, it is used to generate the C code which will be compiled into executable code.

Anything wrong with:

#ifdef ...
printf("Hello");
#endif

Because this is all you can do as far as preprocessors go.

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3  
This won't print at compile-time, which is what I'm thinking OP is looking for. –  Bob Kaufman Sep 30 '10 at 0:23
    
I assumed he meant printing at run-time. –  Alexander Rafferty Sep 30 '10 at 0:30
    
I was asking about compile-time. Thanks! –  Andrew Wagner Oct 1 '10 at 13:59

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