Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Suppose I have a utility library (other) containing a subroutine (sort_it) which I want to use to return arbitrarily sorted data. It's probably more complicated than this, but this illustrates the key concepts:

#!/usr/local/bin/perl

use strict;

package other;

sub sort_it {
  my($data, $sort_function) = @_;

  return([sort $sort_function @$data]);
}

Now let's use it in another package.

package main;
use Data::Dumper;

my($data) = [
        {'animal' => 'bird',            'legs' => 2},
        {'animal' => 'black widow',     'legs' => 8},
        {'animal' => 'dog',             'legs' => 4},
        {'animal' => 'grasshopper',     'legs' => 6},
        {'animal' => 'human',           'legs' => 2},
        {'animal' => 'mosquito',        'legs' => 6},
        {'animal' => 'rhino',           'legs' => 4},
        {'animal' => 'tarantula',       'legs' => 8},
        {'animal' => 'tiger',           'legs' => 4},
        ],

my($sort_by_legs_then_name) = sub {
    return ($a->{'legs'}   <=> $b->{'legs'} ||
            $a->{'animal'} cmp $b->{'animal'});
};

print Dumper(other::sort_it($data, $sort_by_legs_then_name));

This doesn't work, due to a subtle problem. $a and $b are package globals. They refer to $main::a and $main::b when wrapped up in the closure.

We could fix this by saying, instead:

my($sort_by_legs_then_name) = sub {
    return ($other::a->{'legs'}   <=> $other::b->{'legs'} ||
            $other::a->{'animal'} cmp $other::b->{'animal'});
};

This works, but forces us to hardcode the name of our utility package everywhere. Were that to change, we'd need to remember to change the code, not just the use other qw(sort_it); statement that would likely be present in the real world.

You might immediately think to try using __PACKAGE__. That winds up evaluating to "main". So does eval("__PACKAGE__");.

There's a trick using caller that works:

my($sort_by_legs_then_name) = sub {
  my($context) = [caller(0)]->[0];
  my($a) = eval("\$$context" . "::a");
  my($b) = eval("\$$context" . "::b");

  return ($a->{'legs'}   <=> $b->{'legs'} ||
          $a->{'animal'} cmp $b->{'animal'});
};

But this is rather black-magical. It seems like there ought to be some better solution to this. But I haven't found it or figured it out yet.

share|improve this question
1  
If you use caller like that, won't it break just as much if the package that defined the sub and the package that call other::sort_it are different? –  aschepler Sep 30 '10 at 1:31

3 Answers 3

Use the prototype (solution originally proposed in Usenet posting by ysth).

Works on Perl >= 5.10.1 (not sure about earlier).

my($sort_by_legs_then_name) = sub ($$) {
    my ($a1,$b1) = @_;
    return ( $a1->{'legs'} <=> $b1->{'legs'} ||
            $a1->{'animal'} cmp $b1->{'animal'});
};

I get as a result:

$VAR1 = [
      {
        'legs' => 2,
        'animal' => 'bird'
      },
      {
        'legs' => 2,
        'animal' => 'human'
      },
      {
        'legs' => 4,
        'animal' => 'dog'
      },
      {
        'legs' => 4,
        'animal' => 'rhino'
      },
      {
        'legs' => 4,
        'animal' => 'tiger'
      },
      {
        'legs' => 6,
        'animal' => 'grasshopper'
      },
      {
        'legs' => 6,
        'animal' => 'mosquito'
      },
      {
        'legs' => 8,
        'animal' => 'black widow'
      },
      {
        'legs' => 8,
        'animal' => 'tarantula'
      }
    ];
share|improve this answer
    
I wonder if Perl6::Placeholders would work as well? (search.cpan.org/~lpalmer/Perl6-Placeholders-0.07/lib/Perl6/…) –  DVK Sep 30 '10 at 1:47
4  
The change was made in Perl 5.6. There is a documented performance penalty for doing it though. –  Chas. Owens Sep 30 '10 at 2:30
3  
The performance penalty is not that bad in comparison to using an anonymous subroutine, but both are significantly slower than using a block: gist.github.com/603932 This is one senario where abstraction might not be your friend. –  Chas. Owens Sep 30 '10 at 2:44

Try this:

sub sort_it {
  my($data, $sort_function) = @_;
  my($context) = [caller(0)]->[0];
  no strict 'refs';
  local *a = "${context}::a";
  local *b = "${context}::b";
  return([sort $sort_function @$data]);
}

And you will not pay overhead in each call.

But I would prefer

sub sort_it (&@) {
  my $sort_function = shift;
  my($context) = [caller(0)]->[0];
  no strict 'refs';
  local *a = "${context}::a";
  local *b = "${context}::b";
  return([sort $sort_function @_]);
}
share|improve this answer

Here is how to do it:

sub sort_it {
    my ($data, $sort) = @_;
    my $caller = caller;
    eval "package $caller;"    # enter caller's package
       . '[sort $sort @$data]' # sort at full speed
      or die $@                # rethrow any errors
}

eval is needed here because package only takes a bare package name, not a variable.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.