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$ cat flaglist.log
flag1
flag2
flag3
flag4
$

Perl code

my $infile = "flaglist.log";
open my $fpi, '<', $infile or die "$!";
while (<$fpi>) {
    chomp;  
    if ($ENV{$_}) {   # something wrong here
        func($_);
    }       
    else {  
        print "oops\n";
    }       
}

$ perl code.pl
oops
oops
oops
oops
$

All the four flags are names of environment variables that are set (I checked using echo $flag1 from the shell).

Here the if condition always returns false. If I write $ENV{flag1}, it results to true and func() is called as I expected.

What am I doing wrong at the if statement?

share|improve this question
2  
You may mean if( exists $ENV{$_} ). Your current test will fail if you have an environment variable set to 0. –  daotoad Sep 30 '10 at 19:37

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The code seems to work for me. Try stripping any whitespace from the input lines:

while (<$fpi>) {
    s/\s+//g;
    # ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
@eugene, it works, but I don't understand. Wasn't chomp supposed to do the job? –  Lazer Sep 30 '10 at 11:28
5  
@Lazer: No. chomp only removes end of the string that corresponds to the value in $/ which is \n by default. No other trimming takes place. –  Alan Haggai Alavi Sep 30 '10 at 11:32
5  
@Lazer - Are you sure? If you're on Unix, do "cat -vet flaglist.log" - see if there's a space between "1" and "$" –  DVK Sep 30 '10 at 11:44
1  
@DVK: Yes, there is a space. Thanks for pointing out, there is some problem in the code that generates flaglist.log. –  Lazer Sep 30 '10 at 12:04
1  
Also watch out for DOS style newlines on a Unix style system. It's common enough if your moving files between systems. –  Ven'Tatsu Sep 30 '10 at 14:04

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