Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

If I set up an iterator for myList:

Iterator iter = myList.iterator();
while(iter.hasNext())
{
    MyObj myObj = (MyObj)iter.next();
    doPrint(myObj.toString());
}

And I call it a second time:

while(iter.hasNext())
{
    MyObj myObj = (MyObj)iter.next();
    doPrint(myObj.toString());
}

Will it go back to the start of the collection the second time I call it?

share|improve this question
4  
Why not just try yourself? – Fortega Sep 30 '10 at 14:33
up vote 7 down vote accepted

The iterator interface provides just three methods:

  • hasNext()
  • next()
  • remove()

So there is no way to tell the iterator to "reset", to "restart from the beginning" or to "go back". Once it sits on the last element of the underlying sequence, it has done it's job and there's no need to keep the reference. Whisper R.I.P and make it meet Big GC.

share|improve this answer

iter.hasNext() in the second loop will return false immediately, so the code inside the loop won't be executed.

If you re-create the iterator, however (by list.iterator()), iteration will be restarted from the beginning.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for clarity on the result of a second call to .iterator(). – michael.orchard Jan 18 '13 at 15:00

The second part will not be executed, because the iter.hasNext() returns false...

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.