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Can anybody tell me how to remove all CA2202 warnings from the following code?

public static byte[] Encrypt(string data, byte[] key, byte[] iv)
{
    using(MemoryStream memoryStream = new MemoryStream())
    {
        using (DESCryptoServiceProvider cryptograph = new DESCryptoServiceProvider())
        {
            using (CryptoStream cryptoStream = new CryptoStream(memoryStream, cryptograph.CreateEncryptor(key, iv), CryptoStreamMode.Write))
            {
                using(StreamWriter streamWriter = new StreamWriter(cryptoStream))
                {
                    streamWriter.Write(data);
                }
            }
        }
        return memoryStream.ToArray();
    }
}

Warning 7 CA2202 : Microsoft.Usage : Object 'cryptoStream' can be disposed more than once in method 'CryptoServices.Encrypt(string, byte[], byte[])'. To avoid generating a System.ObjectDisposedException you should not call Dispose more than one time on an object.: Lines: 34

Warning 8 CA2202 : Microsoft.Usage : Object 'memoryStream' can be disposed more than once in method 'CryptoServices.Encrypt(string, byte[], byte[])'. To avoid generating a System.ObjectDisposedException you should not call Dispose more than one time on an object.: Lines: 34, 37

You need Visual Studio Code Analysis to see these warnings (these are not c# compiler warnings).

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1  
This code doesn't generate these warnings. –  Julien Hoarau Sep 30 '10 at 14:46
1  
I get 0 warnings for this (Warn level 4, VS2010). And for someone googling problems in this area, pleas add the text of the warnings as well. –  Henk Holterman Sep 30 '10 at 14:47
11  
CAxxxx warnings are generated by Code Analysis and FxCop. –  dtb Sep 30 '10 at 14:48
1  
So is it CA2002 or CA2202? –  dtb Sep 30 '10 at 14:52
1  
it's 2202, sorry about that –  testalino Sep 30 '10 at 14:53

11 Answers 11

up vote -4 down vote accepted

This compiles without warning:

    public static byte[] Encrypt(string data, byte[] key, byte[] iv)
    {
        MemoryStream memoryStream = null;
        DESCryptoServiceProvider cryptograph = null;
        CryptoStream cryptoStream = null;
        StreamWriter streamWriter = null;
        try
        {
            memoryStream = new MemoryStream();
            cryptograph = new DESCryptoServiceProvider();
            cryptoStream = new CryptoStream(memoryStream, cryptograph.CreateEncryptor(key, iv), CryptoStreamMode.Write);
            var result = memoryStream;              
            memoryStream = null;
            streamWriter = new StreamWriter(cryptoStream);
            cryptoStream = null;
            streamWriter.Write(data);
            return result.ToArray();
        }
        finally
        {
            if (memoryStream != null)
                memoryStream.Dispose();
            if (cryptograph != null)
                cryptograph.Dispose();
            if (cryptoStream != null)
                cryptoStream.Dispose();
            if (streamWriter != null)
                streamWriter.Dispose();
        }
    }

Edit in response to the comments: I just verified again that this code does not generate the warning, while the original one does. In the original code, CryptoStream.Dispose() and MemoryStream().Dispose() are actually called twice (which may or may not be a problem).

The modified code works as follows: references are set to null, as soon as responsibilty for disposing is transferred to another object. E.g. memoryStream is set to null after the call to CryptoStream constructor succeeded. cryptoStream is set to null, after the call to StreamWriter constructor succeeded. If no exception occurs, streamWriter is disposed in the finally block and will in turn dispose CryptoStream and MemoryStream.

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40  
-1 It's really bad to create ugly code just to comply with a warning that should be suppressed. –  Jordão Aug 3 '11 at 15:41
4  
I'd agree that you shouldn't butcher you code for something that could end up fixed at some point in the future, just suppress. –  peteski22 Oct 25 '11 at 13:00
2  
How does this solve the problem? CA2202 is still reported because memoryStream can still be disposed of twice in the finally block. –  Chris Gessler Jun 23 '12 at 15:04
    
@ChrisGessler - I don't see how memoryStream could possibly be disposed of twice. –  Henrik Jun 23 '12 at 15:26
1  
Since CryptoStream calls Dispose on the MemoryStream internally, it could be called twice, which is the reason for the warning. I tried your solution and still get the warning. –  Chris Gessler Jun 23 '12 at 15:56

You should suppress the warnings in this case. Code that deals with disposables should be consistent, and you shouldn't have to know that other classes take ownership of the disposables you created:

[SuppressMessage("Microsoft.Usage", "CA2202:Do not dispose objects multiple times")]
public static byte[] Encrypt(string data, byte[] key, byte[] iv) {
  using (var memoryStream = new MemoryStream()) {
    using (var cryptograph = new DESCryptoServiceProvider())
    using (var cryptoStream = new CryptoStream(memoryStream, cryptograph.CreateEncryptor(key, iv), CryptoStreamMode.Write))
    using (var streamWriter = new StreamWriter(cryptoStream)) {
      streamWriter.Write(data);
    }
    return memoryStream.ToArray();
  }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
In my opinion this is a bug in fxcop, this rule is simply wrong. The dispose method should never throw an ObjectDisposedException and if it does then you should deal with it at that time by filing a bug on the author of the code that implements dispose this way. –  justin.m.chase Feb 1 at 22:22
3  
I agree with @HansPassant in the other thread: the tool is doing its job and warning you of an unexpected implementation detail of the classes. Personally, I think the real problem is the design of the APIs themselves. Having the nested classes default to presuming that it's OK to take ownership of another object created elsewhere seems highly questionable. I can see where that could be useful if the resulting object was going to be returned, but defaulting to that assumption seems counter-intuitive, as well as violating normal IDisposable patterns. –  BTJ Feb 4 at 22:00

Well, it is accurate, the Dispose() method on these streams will be called more than once. The StreamReader class will take 'ownership' of the cryptoStream so disposing streamWriter will also dispose cryptoStream. Similarly, the CryptoStream class takes over responsibility for the memoryStream.

These are not exactly real bugs, these .NET classes are resilient to multiple Dispose() calls. But if you want to get rid of the warning then you should drop the using statement for these objects. And pain yourself a bit when reasoning what will happen if the code throws an exception. Or shut-up the warning with an attribute. Or just ignore the warning since it is silly.

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3  
Having to have special knowledge about the internal behavior of classes (like a disposable taking ownership of another one) is too much to ask if one wants to design a reusable API. So I think that the using statements should stay. These warnings are really silly. –  Jordão Sep 30 '10 at 15:16
2  
@Jordão - isn't that what to tool is for? To warn you about internal behavior you might not have known about? –  Hans Passant Sep 30 '10 at 15:27
1  
Nah, it is not internal behavior, it is documented behavior. And it is logical behavior. It will never change. –  Hans Passant Sep 30 '10 at 15:56
5  
I agree. But, I still wouldn't drop the using statements. It just feels wrong to rely on another object to dispose of an object that I created. For this code, it's OK, but there're many implementations of Stream and TextWriter out there (not only on the BCL). The code to use them all should be consistent. –  Jordão Sep 30 '10 at 16:27
1  
Yes, agree with Jordão. If you really want the programmer is aware of the internal behavior of the api, then speak out by naming your function as DoSomethingAndDisposeStream(Stream stream, OtherData data). –  ZZZ Jul 25 '13 at 3:58

When a StreamWriter is disposed, it will automatically dispose the wrapped Stream (here: the CryptoStream). CryptoStream also automatically disposes the wrapped Stream (here: the MemoryStream).

So your MemoryStream is disposed both by the CryptoStream and the using statement. And your CryptoStream is disposed by the StreamWriter and the outer using statement.


After some experimentation, it seems to be impossible to get rid of warnings completely. Theorectically, the MemoryStream needs to be disposed, but then you theoretically couldn't access its ToArray method anymore. Practically, a MemoryStream does not need to be disposed, so I'd go with this solution and suppress the CA2000 warning.

var memoryStream = new MemoryStream();

using (var cryptograph = new DESCryptoServiceProvider())
using (var writer = new StreamWriter(new CryptoStream(memoryStream, ...)))
{
    writer.Write(data);
}

return memoryStream.ToArray();
share|improve this answer
    
This code still generate warnings. –  Matthieu Sep 30 '10 at 15:22
    
Thanks for your attempts to solve this. –  testalino Oct 1 '10 at 10:29

I would do this using #pragma warning disable.

The .NET Framework Guidelines recommend to implement IDisposable.Dispose in such a way that it can be called multiple times. From the MSDN description of IDisposable.Dispose:

The object must not throw an exception if its Dispose method is called multiple times

Therefore the warning seems to be almost meaningless:

To avoid generating a System.ObjectDisposedException you should not call Dispose more than one time on an object

I guess it could be argued that the warning may be helpful if you're using a badly-implemented IDisposable object that does not follow the standard implementation guidelines. But when using classes from the .NET Framework like you are doing, I'd say it's safe to suppress the warning using a #pragma. And IMHO this is preferable to going through hoops as suggested in the MSDN documentation for this warning.

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The cryptostream is based on the memorystream.

What appears to be happening is that when the crypostream is disposed (at end of using) the memorystream is also disposed, then the memorystream is disposed again.

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what bug? statement in warning is correct. –  Andrey Sep 30 '10 at 14:54
    
VS2010 Premium, not a beta –  testalino Sep 30 '10 at 14:55

Off-topic but I would suggest you to use a different formatting technique for grouping usings:

using (var memoryStream = new MemoryStream())
{
    using (var cryptograph = new DESCryptoServiceProvider())
    using (var encryptor = cryptograph.CreateEncryptor(key, iv))
    using (var cryptoStream = new CryptoStream(memoryStream, encryptor, CryptoStreamMode.Write))
    using (var streamWriter = new StreamWriter(cryptoStream))
    {
        streamWriter.Write(data);
    }

    return memoryStream.ToArray();
}

I also advocate using vars here to avoid repetitions of really long class names.

P.S. Thanks to @ShellShock for pointing out I can't omit braces for first using as it would make memoryStream in return statement out of the scope.

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5  
Won't memoryStream.ToArray() be out of scope? –  ShellShock Sep 30 '10 at 14:55
    
This is absolutely equivalent to the original piece of code. I just ommited curly braces, much like you can do so with ifs (though I wouldn't advice this technique for anything other than usings). –  Dan Abramov Sep 30 '10 at 14:58
2  
In the original code, memoryStream.ToArray() was inside the scope of the first using; you've got it outside the scope. –  ShellShock Sep 30 '10 at 15:07
    
Thank you so much, I just realized you meant return statement. So true. I edited the answer to reflect this. –  Dan Abramov Sep 30 '10 at 15:29

I was faced with similar issues in my code.

Looks like the whole CA2202 thing is triggered because MemoryStream can be disposed if exception occurs in constructor (CA2000).

This could be resolved like this:

 1 public static byte[] Encrypt(string data, byte[] key, byte[] iv)
 2 {
 3    MemoryStream memoryStream = GetMemoryStream();
 4    using (DESCryptoServiceProvider cryptograph = new DESCryptoServiceProvider())
 5    {
 6        CryptoStream cryptoStream = new CryptoStream(memoryStream, cryptograph.CreateEncryptor(key, iv), CryptoStreamMode.Write);
 7        using (StreamWriter streamWriter = new StreamWriter(cryptoStream))
 8        {
 9            streamWriter.Write(data);
10            return memoryStream.ToArray();
11        }
12    }
13 }
14
15 /// <summary>
16 /// Gets the memory stream.
17 /// </summary>
18 /// <returns>A new memory stream</returns>
19 private static MemoryStream GetMemoryStream()
20 {
21     MemoryStream stream;
22     MemoryStream tempStream = null;
23     try
24     {
25         tempStream = new MemoryStream();
26
27         stream = tempStream;
28         tempStream = null;
29     }
30     finally
31     {
32         if (tempStream != null)
33             tempStream.Dispose();
34     }
35     return stream;
36 }

Notice that we have to return the memoryStream inside the last using statement (line 10) because cryptoStream gets disposed at line 11 (because it's used in streamWriter using statement), which leads memoryStream to get also disposed at line 11 (because memoryStream is used to create the cryptoStream).

At least this code worked for me.

EDIT:

Funny as it may sound, I discovered that if you replace the GetMemoryStream method with the following code,

/// <summary>
/// Gets a memory stream.
/// </summary>
/// <returns>A new memory stream</returns>
private static MemoryStream GetMemoryStream()
{
    return new MemoryStream();
}

you get the same result.

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I wanted to solve this the right way - that is without suppressing the warnings and rightly disposing all disposable objects.

I pulled out 2 of the 3 streams as fields and disposed them in the Dispose() method of my class. Yes, implementing the IDisposable interface might not necessarily be what you are looking for but the solution looks pretty clean as compared to dispose() calls from all random places in the code.

public class SomeEncryption : IDisposable
    {
        private MemoryStream memoryStream;

        private CryptoStream cryptoStream;

        public static byte[] Encrypt(string data, byte[] key, byte[] iv)
        {
             // Do something
             this.memoryStream = new MemoryStream();
             this.cryptoStream = new CryptoStream(this.memoryStream, encryptor, CryptoStreamMode.Write);
             using (var streamWriter = new StreamWriter(this.cryptoStream))
             {
                 streamWriter.Write(plaintext);
             }
            return memoryStream.ToArray();
        }

       public void Dispose()
        { 
             this.Dispose(true);
             GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
        }

       protected virtual void Dispose(bool disposing)
        {
            if (disposing)
            {
                if (this.memoryStream != null)
                {
                    this.memoryStream.Dispose();
                }

                if (this.cryptoStream != null)
                {
                    this.cryptoStream.Dispose();
                }
            }
        }
   }
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I used this kind of code that takes byte[] and return byte[] without using streams

public static byte[] Encrypt(byte[] data, byte[] key, byte[] iv)
{
  DES des = new DES();
  des.BlockSize = 128;
  des.Mode = CipherMode.CBC;
  des.Padding = PaddingMode.Zeros;
  des.IV = IV
  des.Key = key
  ICryptoTransform encryptor = des.CreateEncryptor();

  //and finaly operations on bytes[] insted of streams
  return encryptor.TransformFinalBlock(plaintextarray,0,plaintextarray.Length);
}

This way all you have to do is conversion from string to byte[] using encodings.

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Avoid all usings and use nested Dispose-Calls!

    public static byte[] Encrypt(string data, byte[] key, byte[] iv)
    {
        MemoryStream memoryStream = null;
        DESCryptoServiceProvider cryptograph = null;
        CryptoStream cryptoStream = null;
        StreamWriter streamWriter = null;

        try
        {
            memoryStream = new MemoryStream();
            cryptograph = new DESCryptoServiceProvider();
            cryptoStream = new CryptoStream(memoryStream, cryptograph.CreateEncryptor(key, iv), CryptoStreamMode.Write);
            streamWriter = new StreamWriter(cryptoStream);

            streamWriter.Write(data);
            return memoryStream.ToArray();
        }
        finally 
        {
            if(streamWriter != null)
                streamWriter.Dispose();
            else if(cryptoStream != null)
                cryptoStream.Dispose();
            else if(memoryStream != null)
                memoryStream.Dispose();

            if (cryptograph != null)
                cryptograph.Dispose();
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Please explain why you should avoid using in this case. –  StuperUser Oct 22 '12 at 11:19
1  
You could keep the using-statement in the middle, but you have to resolve the other ones. To get a logical coherent and in all directions upgradeable solution I decided to remove all usings! –  Harry Saltzman Oct 22 '12 at 16:59

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